Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: Is This PSU good enough for a gaming rig?


27 Mar 2010   #1

Windows 7 Pro 32Bit
 
 
Is This PSU good enough for a gaming rig?

Im building a gaming PC at the moment and i have got this case: Casecom Black Midi Tower Case - Cheap at Ebuyer! and this is the PSU im gona be buying : CIT 750W Dual 12V Rail 12cm Fan PSU - 2x SATA 1x PCI-E - Ebuyer as this has 7 molex as well as 2 SATA which i need only thing i was worried about was the fan it has on top of the PSU will it be ok and not over heat as the PSU sits at the top of the case covering it. Also soes it seem like an ok PSU for price. Thanks for any help you can give.

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

27 Mar 2010   #2

Windows 8.1 Pro RTM x64
 
 

The PSU needs to be mounted so that the fan is underneath and not on top. That way, it pulls the warm air from within the case and vents it away from your system through the PSU, with the air exiting your system through the grid of holes on its rear panel.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
27 Mar 2010   #3

Windows 7, 64 bit Home SP1, Win 8.1.1 Pro 64 bit
 
 

The case looks OK however there are "gaming" cases sold. Avoid the "off brand" or inexpensive power supplies. They tend to be overrated (in watts) and also have poor voltage regulation. Go with a better "name brand" power supply. Do not go for the "inexpensive" if you are building a real gaming system.

I just upgraded my power supply to a 750 watt XFX "black" modular type power supply. Usually, you wind up with too many cables from a power supply and the modular type eliminates some of the cable clutter.

As far as the fan, you can mount power supplies either way with the fan down (towards the motherboard - the usual way with a top mounted power supply) or with the fan pointing up. So it's not an issue of where the fan is physically located.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


27 Mar 2010   #4

Windows 7 Pro 32Bit
 
 

thanks for the replys the only other 1 i was considering was this 1 : Arctic Power 500W PSU With PCI-E 2x SATA, 20+4 ATX12V 8pin +12V Connectors - Retail Boxed - Ebuyer
but its alot less watts and not enough molex's do you know of any for 30-40 that are any good?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Mar 2010   #5

Windows 7 Profession 64-bit
 
 

Buying a cheap supply is like pouring cheap gas in your new Porsche. Would you do that? You might, but would you expect top performance? A car motor can miss a beat and keep running, not so with high speed digital electronics.

I would stop trying to save money and invest in a good supply from a reputable maker. A well chosen supply will last years and support you through several hardware upgrades. Following is my canned text on sizing and selecting a good PSU.
***
Use the eXtreme PSU Calculator Lite to determine your power supply unit (PSU) requirements. Plug in all the hardware you think you might have in 2 or 3 years (extra drives, bigger or 2nd video card, more RAM, etc.). Be sure to read and heed the notes at the bottom of the page. I recommend setting Capacitor Aging to 30%, and if you participate in distributive computing projects (e.g. BOINC or Folding@Home) or extreme 3D animated gaming, I recommend setting both TDP and system load to 100%. These steps ensure the supply has adequate head room for stress free (and perhaps quieter) operation, and future hardware demands. Research your video card and pay particular attention to the power supply requirements for your card listed on your video card maker's website. If not listed, check a comparable card (same graphics engine and RAM) from a different maker. The key specifications, in order of importance are:
  1. Current (amperage or amps) on the +12V rail,
  2. Efficiency,
  3. Total wattage.
Then look for power supply brands listed under the "Good" column of PC Mechanic's PSU Reference List. Ensure the supplied amperage on the +12V rails of your chosen PSU meets the requirements of your video card. Don't try to save a few dollars by getting a cheap supply. And don't count on supplies that come included with a case. They are often underrated, budget or poor quality models "tossed in" to make the case sale. Digital electronics, including CPUs, RAM, and today's advanced graphics cards, need clean, stable power. A good, well chosen supply will provide years of service and upgrade wiggle room. I strongly recommend you pick a supply with an efficiency rating equal to, or greater than 80%. Look for the 80 Plus - EnergyStar Compliant label. And don't forget to budget for a good UPS with AVR (automatic voltage regulation), as surge and spike protectors are inadequate.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Mar 2010   #6

 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Digerati View Post

I would stop trying to save money and invest in a good supply from a reputable maker.
Exactly. Never go cheap on a PSU.


Unfortunately both of those PSU's you linked are cheap for a reason.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Mar 2010   #7

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

I will also recommend the power supply calculator above and reaffirm that you don't want to go cheap on the power supply. Power supplies are a critical component and you want something solid there.

I also recommend going with a modular power supply if you care about tidy wiring inside your case. The modular units really cut down on cable clutter.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Mar 2010   #8

Windows 7 Profession 64-bit
 
 

Quote:
I also recommend going with a modular power supply if you care about tidy wiring inside your case. The modular units really cut down on cable clutter.
The emphasis on quality cannot be more important when dealing with modular PSUs. While a modular PSU allows you to only use the cables you need, each connection and connector is a potential point of failure and degradation. So while you can achieve better air flow through the case with a modular PSU, you can also introduce electrical noise and poor quality voltages at the same time, and the opportunity to knock another connection loose every time you do maintenance.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Mar 2010   #9

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
Quote:
I also recommend going with a modular power supply if you care about tidy wiring inside your case. The modular units really cut down on cable clutter.
The emphasis on quality cannot be more important when dealing with modular PSUs. While a modular PSU allows you to only use the cables you need, each connection and connector is a potential point of failure and degradation. So while you can achieve better air flow through the case with a modular PSU, you can also introduce electrical noise and poor quality voltages at the same time, and the opportunity to knock another connection loose every time you do maintenance.

Agreed. I use a Corsair modular myself. However, I've never even come close to knocking a connection loose. Perhaps really tight connections are another quality feature.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Mar 2010   #10

Windows 7 Home Premium X64
 
 

My PC is a gaming rig and only has a 480w supply, it really depends on what is going inside, overclocked, powerful CPUs and GPUs can pull in far, far more than my 480w supply could handle.

and of course, for goodness sake don't cheap out, what happens when a crud PSU fails on you (and it will) is horrible and can be expensive! Even poor connections can damage or even break your computer, the voltages are not high but the currents are and you want nice firm connections. I once cheaped out on a PSU, learn from my mistake! ;P

also, as said, think ahead, your PSU is likely going to be the longest lived component in your PC, and hopefully will be with you for a long time, so buying cheap is a false economy in many ways.


digis posts are very useful
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Is This PSU good enough for a gaming rig?




Thread Tools



Similar help and support threads for2: Is This PSU good enough for a gaming rig?
Thread Forum
Solved For $1.3k, is this a good gaming rig? Will it actually work? Hardware & Devices
Is this a good computer for gaming? Chillout Room
Solved Are these components good for a gaming pc Gaming
What is a good gaming headset? Hardware & Devices
Will this pc be good enough for gaming Gaming
Is this a good gaming rig? Gaming

Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:39 PM.
Twitter Facebook Google+



Windows 7 Forums

Seven Forums Android App Seven Forums IOS App
  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33