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Windows 7: W7-64 UpGrade won't boot from DVD


16 Nov 2010   #1

XP
 
 
W7-64 UpGrade won't boot from DVD

I have a Win 7 64 bit DVD (from MS), that I've inserted into my DVD drive and it doesn't boot up at all. And yes, both in the BIOS and using the F8 key, I've done everything I can to start the boot from the CD/DVD drive which otherwise works fine.

The DVD doesn't boot at all and when I try to start it from the WinXp explorer window I get an error message that says that the operating system cannot start the program. I know that the system can handle the 64 bit OS. Any ideas?

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

16 Nov 2010   #2

Operating System : Windows 7 Home Premium Edition 6.01.7600 SP1 (x64)
 
 

hello and welcome to the forums have you set the bios to boot from your dvd/cd drive?

CLEAN INSTALL



A clean install of Windows 7 uses Microsoft's Interactive Setup wizard. The install process has been vastly improved from previous versions of Windows for the most streamlined install process yet. Follow these steps to install Windows 7 as a clean install:

Insert the Windows 7 DVD in your system's optical drive and boot the system (or reboot). Depending on your basic input/output system (BIOS) settings, you may need to press a key to change the boot order, so the machine boots from the DVD; or you may get a message to press any key to boot from CD or DVD; or you may not get a message at all and see a black screen with a pulsating Windows logo and the "Starting Windows" text.

The initial setup windows will appear showing Windows 7 and three options. This is where you may select the language, time, and currency format, and keyboard input type. These options are only for the setup but also for the actual Windows 7 installation as an administrator may install Windows 7 in different language than the end user. Select Next when the correct options have been selected.

This window will give you the main option to install and two other options. Selecting Install now will do just that. Selecting What to know before installing Windows will pop up a document that provides general information that you should know before installing Windows 7, including the difference between an upgrade and custom install. Selecting the Repair your computer will bring up the Windows Recovery Environment, which includes Startup Repair. Select Install now to continue the installation.

A Setup is starting… window will appear briefly, depending on your hardware. The next window that requires interaction is the Microsoft End User License Agreement, also known as the EULA. It is recommended that you read this agreement before agreeing to it. In actuality, the end user should also read this. Administrators know this rarely occurs, but for legal purposes we must recommend you read this. If you accept the agreement, check the check box stating I accept the license terms and click Next.

The following screen allows the selection of installation type. As we are performing a clean install, the Custom installation option will be selected. Note that Microsoft reiterates that this option does not keep your files, settings, and programs and includes a recommendation to back up files before proceeding. As this is a clean install to a new hard drive or computer, there should not be data that needs to be backed up. Select Custom and proceed.

In the next window, you will select where to install Windows 7. This screen varies depending on how many physical hard drives and partitions are configured in your system. This screen also gives you Drive options (advanced) to configure your physical disks and partitions. A new system with a blank hard drive will display Disk 0 Unallocated Space and Next may be selected if you do not want to partition the disk and want to let Windows Setup handle it.

If there is more than one physical drive, then Disk 0, Disk 1, and so on will display for the number of physical discs. If there is more than one partition on a disk, then Disk 0 Partition 1, Disk 0 Partition 2, and so on will appear for each partition on a physical disc. You may select the disk and partition where you want to install Windows 7 and click Next, but clicking Drive options (advanced) will provide more options.

Selecting Drive options (advanced) allows for more options than just selecting where to install. Here you may delete a partition, format a partition, create a partition, and extend a partition if the physical disk has unallocated space. It is recommended that the partition where you plan to install Windows 7 be formatted before continuing. Once the disk and partition for Windows 7 install is highlighted, select Next.

If a disk drive does not show up, it could be because Windows Setup does not have the driver for it. A Load Driver option is available to load the driver for the drive. This can be found in the hard disk manufacturer's Web site or provided with the drive and/or card used in the system. This may occur if Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID), Small Computer Serial Interface (SCSI), or a new type of disk drive is used. Select Load Driver and follow the wizard so the drive appears or select Browse to manually assign it. Refresh can be clicked to refresh the list.

Once Next is selected from the Where do you want to install Windows? screen, Windows 7 will install on your system. A progress window will appear warning of several restarts. Depending on the hardware on this system, this process will take from as little as 10 min up to 45 min; allow more time for slower systems.

A few reboots, screen flickers, and other hard work by your system will finish with a final reboot and a greeting welcoming you to Setup Windows. The system will reboot and Windows will ask you for a user name and computer name. These two criteria are very important.

User name – The user name setup in this step will be given administrator privileges. Unlike Windows XP but like Windows Vista, only one user will be created here and the "Administrator" account is not a visible account for security reasons. A user name of "Administrator" cannot be created for security reasons. Because this user name will be an administrator, you should create an administrative user name that will not be used on a daily basis. We recommend using "OSInstaller" or a similar name.
Computer name – the computer name or host name is how this machine will be identified on the network. Remember that no two like names should exist on the same network. It is a best practice to have a naming convention in place and to follow it. A security identifier (SID) will be created based on the computer name, so changing the computer name later will not change the SID.
Ease of access – Notice the Ease of Access button on the bottom left of the screen. This feature may be used from this point forward to narrate, magnify, see high contrast, and use the on-screen keyboard, sticky keys, and filter keys.
The next screen is to set a password for the account originally created. Next to Type a password is a (recommended) inference. This is absolutely necessary. Recall the user name created previously has administrative privileges. For that user, please create a password that is complex and that only you and/or a limited number of administrators have access to.

After setting a password, you may or may not be asked for a product key. This depends on the version and media used to install. If you are prompted for a product key, you may enter it now and select to automatically activate Windows after getting online. You may opt out of entering the license key at this point but will only have 30 days to input it later. The following screen will ask whether to enable automatic updates. The following are the three options to choose from:

Use recommended settings – This option will download and install important and recommended updates automatically by checking every day at 3:00 a.m. by default. It will also allow all users to install updates on the system and get Microsoft product updates for software such as Microsoft Office and other Microsoft applications. These are the recommended settings for security purposes.
Install important updates only – This option will only download and install important updates, including security updates, automatically by checking every day at 3:00 a.m. by default. This option is recommended as an alternative to the above.
Ask me later – This option will allow you to configure automatic updates later and will make the machine unsecure as updates are already out, meaning that your machine will be vulnerable as soon as it gets connected to the Internet. This option is not recommended.
The next window will ask for the time zone and setting the correct time. It is a best practice to choose the correct time zone and time for administrative purposes. If Windows 7 detected and installed your network hardware drivers correctly and detects a wired or wireless network, the following windows may appear:

Wireless Network Setup – If a wireless network is in range, this window will appear. Here you may select the wireless network to connect to as well as provide the security key if it has one. Select your computer's current location - This window will pop up every time the user connects to a new network. It is very important that the end user be trained to select the correct network type the system is connecting to. Depending on this selection, certain networking and security features are configured.

Home network – The home network is considered a private network for security purposes, meaning that it is trusted. Furthermore, it will ask to set up a HomeGroup.
Work network – The work network is also considered a private network for security purposes, meaning that it is trusted as well.
Public network – This network selection is for any public or other network that is not trusted such as cyber cafés, wireless hot spots, and any network that may be hostile. It is extremely important that this is selected when on these networks as the firewall and other security features will be defensively configured.
The Windows 7 desktop should now be visible and some of the above steps may have been skipped.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Nov 2010   #3
Microsoft MVP

Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center 64 bit
 
 

I've seen at least two other threads where upgrade media, even from Microsoft, was not bootable. My guess is Microsoft doesn't want you doing a clean install with an upgrade version. They are trying to force you to install it from another version of windows. Programs like magic iso or ultra iso should be able to tell you if the DVD is in fact bootable. Either one or both should be available as a trial. It's too bad disk management wouldn't list this info for optical media.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


16 Nov 2010   #4

Windows 7 Pro/32 Academic. Build 7600
 
 

^^Yes, it seems to somewhat of a crapshoot. I have an upgrade academic version ($19.99 at the school bookstore) that boots just fine. Could also be user error.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Nov 2010   #5

XP
 
 

Thanks for the replys. Brianzon, currently, your info is not much help. If you read my post thru, I have made sure the cd/dvd drive is the first selected for booting up.

Alphanumeric, it's on a computer with a registered version of WinXP and I get no options for either a clean or custom install. When I duble click in explorer it tells me the DVD program isn't compatible with the OS.

MBorner-User Error? - That's what I'm trying to find out.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Nov 2010   #6

Windows 7 Pro/32 Academic. Build 7600
 
 

Once you have changed your BIOS to boot from the CD, save and exit the BIOS and continue to boot into Windows with the install DVD removed from the drive. When Windows is fully booted, insert the install disk and close the drawer. If autoplay starts the DVD, close or cancel the installation. You should now be at your desktop with the Windows Installation DVD in the drive.
Restart the PC. When the message "press any key to boot from CD" appears,
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press any key. Be quick with this because you will only have a few seconds while the message is there. You'll begin to see files loading. Continue to the boot menu from there.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Nov 2010   #7

Win7 Enterprise, Win7 x86 (Ult 7600), Win7 x64 Ult 7600, TechNet RTM on AMD x64 (2.8Ghz)
 
 

Also try tapping the F10, F11, or F12 keys during boot up. This sometimes brings up the Bios Boot-Up menu.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Nov 2010   #8

Operating System : Windows 7 Home Premium Edition 6.01.7600 SP1 (x64)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by VidE View Post
Thanks for the replys. Brianzon, currently, your info is not much help. If you read my post thru, I have made sure the cd/dvd drive is the first selected for booting up.

Alphanumeric, it's on a computer with a registered version of WinXP and I get no options for either a clean or custom install. When I duble click in explorer it tells me the DVD program isn't compatible with the OS.

MBorner-User Error? - That's what I'm trying to find out.
okey dokey its there if you need it in my bios i have to change two settings otherwise mine does not boot one is priority over the boot order if that's not set no go. all bios have a different set up according to the manufacturer do you know who yours is?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Nov 2010   #9

Windows 7 Home Premium 32-Bit - Build 7600 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by VidE View Post
I have a Win 7 64 bit DVD (from MS), that I've inserted into my DVD drive and it doesn't boot up at all. And yes, both in the BIOS and using the F8 key, I've done everything I can to start the boot from the CD/DVD drive which otherwise works fine.

The DVD doesn't boot at all and when I try to start it from the WinXp explorer window I get an error message that says that the operating system cannot start the program. I know that the system can handle the 64 bit OS. Any ideas?
Look at this tutorial. You should not have a problem if it is followed. If so, get back to us. Doing a Clean Install with a Upgrade Windows 7 Version
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Nov 2010   #10

Operating System : Windows 7 Home Premium Edition 6.01.7600 SP1 (x64)
 
 

is your dvd/cd drive ok? have you tried another if you can? i had this same trouble could not boot into a drive so i whipped out the old one and put a new one in and it booted first time are you using a drive connected to the motherboard (sata)? i tried to boot from external drive with usb connection once but that did not boot.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 W7-64 UpGrade won't boot from DVD




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