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Windows 7: Will Clean Install of Win 7 Obliterate Satellite Connection?


01 Dec 2010   #1

Windows 7 home premium 32 bit
 
 
Will Clean Install of Win 7 Obliterate Satellite Connection?

I've just purchased the Windows 7 Home Premium O/S upgrade and want to do a clean install from Vista. I have the link to the tutorial on doing this, and I'm ready to tackle it, but my internet is Hughes Net, and I'm afraid when I reformat that I'm going to lose my internet connection. I don't want to wipe out my internet without knowing how I'm going to be able to get it back.

Before I make a call to Huges Net, does someone here have the answer? I know I'll have to wait for a service call, so I want to be sure I don't do something stupid!

Thanks.
Karen

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

01 Dec 2010   #2

Windows 7 Home Premium 32-Bit - Build 7600 SP1
 
 

I don't have satelite, I have DSL. I don't see why it should be any different. When you format your hard drive, everything will be gone, you will need to have backups of your data files, Once you install Win 7 again, you should be able to get your internet going. I don't see any reason to call Hughes. It might take a little time until you get it configured again, but it would not be anything Hughes would be concerned with. Just make note of all of your settings in the email software. You should be fine.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Dec 2010   #3

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center
 
 

Hi Karen, welcome to the Seven Forums.

As bigmck said, you probably have no problems. Windows Seven is really good in networking and getting you to the Internet, most of the times you are directly connected after finishing the installation.

I know some other geeks are going to fill my message inbox with some negative messages now, me belonging to the clear minority speaking for in-place upgrade, but I'm still going to say this: An in-place upgrade is a good and working alternative. It leaves your files and applications, and your network connections intact on your system, just replacing Vista system files with Seven.

A year ago I wrote this short tutorial: A simple guide to a successful in-place upgrade. Since that. I've done a lot more in-place upgrades, still without a single problem. If you have backed up your files and you are in any case prepared to do a clean install, you lose nothing but a little time by trying first an in-place upgrade installation.

The result might surprise you positively.

Kari
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


02 Dec 2010   #4

Windows 7 Pro/32 Academic. Build 7600
 
 

Kari is a genius! Which is why I'm surprised that he recommended an in-place installation. (Don't worry, Kari, you have nothing in your in box from me.)
With that, I would go ahead and follow your tutorial on a clean install using upgrade media. As far as your internet connection goes, once you get Windows installed, that's it, you're done.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Dec 2010   #5

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mborner View Post
Which is why I'm surprised that he recommended an in-place installation. (Don't worry, Kari, you have nothing in your in box from me.)
Almost all of the critics against in-place upgrade come from users who have in fact never tried it, who base their opinion in rumors, what they have read or heard in different forums. I'm most surprised every time I read or hear an old school geek to start his / her advice: "You must do a clean install. In-place only brings problems. I have never done that." This is very typical when speaking about computers, as everyone knows. A good example is this thread, started only a few hours ago; several years old rumor, absolutely not true, but still many PC users believe it, constantly asking how it could be avoided.

Computing world is full of these stories. Don't transfer your files from old computer to new one with Windows Easy Transfer, it screws your system. Complete BS; WET is nice, working piece of software, works well when instructions are followed. Empty Superfetch to speed your computer. Again, full and genuine BS; letting Windows to take care of Superfetch decreases the load time of applications. Windows Search does not work. BS; it works well and fast, you just have to know how to use it.

That's just a few examples. In-place upgrade is maybe the most idiotic of these rumors based on misinformation, users who have never even seen someone else to in-place upgrade telling on different forums how bad that is.

Honestly, Mborner, please tell me how many in-place upgrades from Vista to Seven, or earlier from XP to Vista you have done? If some, what went wrong, what did not work afterwards, and how you can tell the issue was because of in-place upgrade? If none, on what is your opinion based? And please, no BS answers: if you talk based on your own experience, you can certainly tell what went wrong. Don't tell me you don't remember anymore.

I repeat what I said on that short and small tutorial I linked in my previous post: I have done more in-place upgrades during my professional years than I can remember. I have had zero problems, absolutely none whatsoever. OF course I have had installation problems, too, but every time an in-place upgrade has failed, I've tried a clean install to formatted HD on the same computer and it has failed, too. The point here is, the reason has not been on Windows or on in-place upgrade, it's always been a question of faulty install media, non-functioning third party driver or hardware device.

It's a bit funny that none of the critics seem to understand this simple fact: if in-place upgrade really didn't work, if it was not a completely acceptable way to upgrade, don't you think Microsoft had already made it impossible? Do you honestly believe Microsoft would allow an essential part of the installation procedure to be possible if they knew it's not working?

If Vista computer is well maintained, if you follow the steps I have described on that tut, if you do things correctly, in-place upgrade is a painless, easy, straight forward procedure.

Mborner, I am really waiting to read what were the problems in your in-place upgrade tries. Either that, or you to admit you have only heard it or read about it to be problematic.

Never modest, always sincere

Kari
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Dec 2010   #6

Windows 7 home premium 32 bit
 
 

The reason I want to do a clean install is that my computer has been acting strangely. I can no longer open .exe or .pdf files I've downloaded. The computer can't even find them, even though they have clearly been downloaded. I've had to use my "baby" laptop to download files and transfer them to this desktop computer.

There have been other quirky things going on, so I've been doing a daily data back-up just in case it decides to crash. I was getting help trying to diagnose the problem on the Vista forum, but everything we tried came up clean. It was then that I decided to upgrade to Windows 7, since I was going to do a total restore anyway. I bought the upgrade, which arrived yesterday, and will back up my data once more before doing the install.

It was determined that my problems are software-related, rather than hardware-related, so it made sense that I should do the clean install, rather than risk bringing my problem into the new O/S when if I did just a normal upgrade. I've copied all my license numbers from the anti-virus and other programs that I downloaded from the internet, and I trust I can reload my data from the external drive when I'm done doing the install. Then I'll cross my fingers that my computer will be back to its normally-reliable self.

I found the brochure that was left by the Hughes Net installer. It gives me the SAN, PIN, IP Address, and Subnet Mask numbers. I assume that would be all I would need to get back online after the install, should the computer not recognize the modem? The installer sat here and plugged in a lot of information the day the satellite was installed, so I assumed that there was something resident on my computer. I'm pleased if that is not the case, as I'd hate to have to wait for a service call before getting my internet back.

Thanks for any input.......

Karen
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Dec 2010   #7

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center
 
 

Karen, in that case I agree: you should do a clean install. In-place is a good alternative only when Vista is working without issues.

Good luck, come back here if you have any problems with setting up your Internet connection (which I doubt).

Happy computing!

Kari
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Dec 2010   #8

Windows 7 home premium 32 bit
 
 

Okay..... ready to back-up, then attack the install with fear and trepidation. I know just enough about computers to be dangerous, lol. I'm HOPING that even if I have internet connection problems with this computer that I can plug the modem into the laptop and have it work.... that should do it if the information needed is with the modem and not anything resident on this computer. I have numbers I need should I have to plug them in when attached to the other computer.

I thought doing a complete system store on my old computer was nerve-wracking. This is much worse! At least back then we had dial-up, and I knew I would be able to get online again with another computer. This time I'm not so sure.

If I'm successful, I'll probably be back sometime today on this computer. If I'm not, I may be back asking questions from the "outpost" at the library, lol.

Thanks for the input.

Karen
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Dec 2010   #9

Windows 7 Pro/32 Academic. Build 7600
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Kari View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mborner View Post
Which is why I'm surprised that he recommended an in-place installation. (Don't worry, Kari, you have nothing in your in box from me.)
Almost all of the critics against in-place upgrade come from users who have in fact never tried it, who base their opinion in rumors, what they have read or heard in different forums. I'm most surprised every time I read or hear an old school geek to start his / her advice: "You must do a clean install. In-place only brings problems. I have never done that." This is very typical when speaking about computers, as everyone knows. A good example is this thread, started only a few hours ago; several years old rumor, absolutely not true, but still many PC users believe it, constantly asking how it could be avoided.

Computing world is full of these stories. Don't transfer your files from old computer to new one with Windows Easy Transfer, it screws your system. Complete BS; WET is nice, working piece of software, works well when instructions are followed. Empty Superfetch to speed your computer. Again, full and genuine BS; letting Windows to take care of Superfetch decreases the load time of applications. Windows Search does not work. BS; it works well and fast, you just have to know how to use it.

That's just a few examples. In-place upgrade is maybe the most idiotic of these rumors based on misinformation, users who have never even seen someone else to in-place upgrade telling on different forums how bad that is.

Honestly, Mborner, please tell me how many in-place upgrades from Vista to Seven, or earlier from XP to Vista you have done? If some, what went wrong, what did not work afterwards, and how you can tell the issue was because of in-place upgrade? If none, on what is your opinion based? And please, no BS answers: if you talk based on your own experience, you can certainly tell what went wrong. Don't tell me you don't remember anymore.

I repeat what I said on that short and small tutorial I linked in my previous post: I have done more in-place upgrades during my professional years than I can remember. I have had zero problems, absolutely none whatsoever. OF course I have had installation problems, too, but every time an in-place upgrade has failed, I've tried a clean install to formatted HD on the same computer and it has failed, too. The point here is, the reason has not been on Windows or on in-place upgrade, it's always been a question of faulty install media, non-functioning third party driver or hardware device.

It's a bit funny that none of the critics seem to understand this simple fact: if in-place upgrade really didn't work, if it was not a completely acceptable way to upgrade, don't you think Microsoft had already made it impossible? Do you honestly believe Microsoft would allow an essential part of the installation procedure to be possible if they knew it's not working?

If Vista computer is well maintained, if you follow the steps I have described on that tut, if you do things correctly, in-place upgrade is a painless, easy, straight forward procedure.

Mborner, I am really waiting to read what were the problems in your in-place upgrade tries. Either that, or you to admit you have only heard it or read about it to be problematic.

Never modest, always sincere

Kari
Kari, you seem to have taken my "genius" remark as sarcastic. I can assure you, it is not out of sarcasm, and is quite sincere. I was hoping to make that clear by using the smileys. I do believe that you are one of the more intelligent persons on this board. My comment was more out of surprise, as most Windows gurus would not recommend an in-place upgrade. I agree with your post about in-place upgrades being satisfactory as long as the current install is working flawlessly, without problems or bugs. To be honest with you, these systems rarely exist outside the hands of the tech savvy, which is to say, most. An in-place install won't fix what problems the current install has. I'm not going to lie to you and tell you that my in-place install experience is vast and problematic. You got me there. My only experience comes from people, well, like you, and other research material. I have not yet seen, in the last 20 years or so, a single Windows book, article, magazine, or tips/tricks, that did not recommend a clean install over an in-place upgrade. Microsoft, themselves, recommend a clean install over and in-place upgrade. You are a well respected member, here, I didn't mean to offend you.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Dec 2010   #10

Windows 7 home premium 32 bit
 
 

I'm already confused, and I just put the installation disk in the drive, lol. I've determined that I still have internet using my little laptop. Unplugged the modem from the desktop and plugged it in here, and can get online no problem. First fear allayed with that move!

In the tutorial it says to "1. Do a clean install at boot without checking the Automatically activate Windows when I'm online box during the installation process."

This may sound stupid, but when I get the box that pops up after the disk is placed in the DVD drive, do I click on setup.exe? Or do I open to view files and pick something else to the the clean install. Will it ask me what I want to do in that regard after I click on setup.exe?

I don't want to muff this up and then not have anything usable when I get done. I have no confidence that this is going to end well

Karen
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Will Clean Install of Win 7 Obliterate Satellite Connection?




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