Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: Win 7 install on SSD


18 Dec 2011   #1

Windows Professional
 
 
Win 7 install on SSD

With HDD's I would partition (multiple), format, and install Win. Apparently with the SSD's it sounds like it is necessary to let Win 7 do everything from scratch so that it will properly "align" the SSD partition(s).

Is there a way to do this and eliminate the 200mb hidden system partition while maintaining alignment? Also, at what point do you divide the SSD up into multiple partitions?

I know this can't be that difficult but it's just different than working with a HDD.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

18 Dec 2011   #2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 SP1, Home Premium, 64-bit
 
 

If you don't want that 200 mb "system reserved" partition, you should use Diskpart to make your partitions.

If you have a traditional Windows install disk, you access diskpart with Shift F10 early in the installation----at the screen where you are asked about your chosen language.

You can make all desired partitions in diskpart or you can just make C and then make the others using Disk Management after Windows is installed.

Windows 7 should sense that you have an SSD and make a few needed adjustments---such as confirming proper alignment.

Disconnect any other drives before beginning.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
18 Dec 2011   #3
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

Have a look at this tutorial. You can avoid the small active partition if you predefine an active, primary aligned partition. And than the partitions behind it would be automatically aligned.

This tutorial explains the alignment steps: SSD Alignment
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


18 Dec 2011   #4

Windows Professional
 
 

Excellent. thanks for the info. Quite a change from the way I did it in XP.

Using Diskpart, if I make the entire disk "drive c:" can I later come back and reduce the size of C: and make a couple of smaller partions? Or do I initially make a smaller drive C: and then use disk manager to fill up the rest of the disk? I'll look closer at the tutorial. Just want to make sure I get the alignment issue correct.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
18 Dec 2011   #5
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

The smart approach is NOT to cover the whole drive with C: leave unallocated what you do not currently need. Extending the partition later is easy. There are 2 reasons:

1. It will be difficult later to shrink a big chunk off the partition because the system puts the MFT (master file table) high up into the partition. And that cannot be moved - at least not with Disk Management.

2. The more unallocated space you have on the SSD, the easier it is for the SSD's garbage collection to function. That is something specific to SSDs which you might want to read up on via Google. E.g. here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garbage_collection_(SSD)#Garbage_collection
My System SpecsSystem Spec
18 Dec 2011   #6

Windows Professional
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by whs View Post
The smart approach is NOT to cover the whole drive with C: leave unallocated what you do not currently need. Extending the partition later is easy. There are 2 reasons:

1. It will be difficult later to shrink a big chunk off the partition because the system puts the MFT (master file table) high up into the partition. And that cannot be moved - at least not with Disk Management.

2. The more unallocated space you have on the SSD, the easier it is for the SSD's garbage collection to function. That is something specific to SSDs which you might want to read up on via Google. E.g. here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garbage_collection_(SSD)#Garbage_collection
Sorry, by later I meant immediately after creating the initial Drive C: partition. In other words use Diskpart to allocate the entire SSD to one partition (Drive C and then after formatting come back with Disk Manager and reduce C: by creating D: and E:. Hope I'm not complicating this simple process, and since I'm not used to Diskpart I might be able to accomplish everything I want from there.

And thanks for the comment about leaving an unallocated space. I've read that the rule of thumb if possible is 20% of the drive's capacity.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
18 Dec 2011   #7
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

The problem you will face if you want to shrink the original partition later is that you may only be able to shrink very little (because of the MFT). That's why it is better to start small - or at least not more than you initially plan to use. Then allocate a dummy partition behind C: which will serve for later expansion. And that followed by another data partition.

Reason for the dummy is that the freespace has to be adjacent to the right of the partition if you want to expand. And that you can eventually get by deleting the dummy partition.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
18 Dec 2011   #8

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 SP1, Home Premium, 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pulpwood007 View Post

Sorry, by later I meant immediately after creating the initial Drive C: partition. In other words use Diskpart to allocate the entire SSD to one partition (Drive C and then after formatting come back with Disk Manager and reduce C: by creating D: and E:.
If you know what size you want C to be, you are better off making a C of that size in Diskpart, rather than making C take up all of the drive and then later shrinking C in Disk Management after Windows is installed.

Why? Because if you attempt to shrink C in Windows Disk Management, it may refuse to shrink it as much as you would like--and you would then be forced to use a third party tool----Partition Wizard. It works, but why bother with it if you can set the final desired size of C in Diskpart?

It doesn't matter one way or another whether you make D and E in Diskpart. You could make both in Diskpart, or you could make only C in Diskpart (leaving the rest of the drive as "unallocated space") and then make D and E in Disk Management after Windows is installed--without having to shrink C.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
18 Dec 2011   #9

Windows Professional
 
 

WHS:

After reading your linked Wiki article I'm rethinking my strategy. Looks like best option is to just use one partition (drive C: only) and just make it large enough for immediate needs. If I'm understanding you and the article, the portion of the drive that is unallocated and obviously unformatted is used in the garbage collection process. This is really a new learning process after years of using spindle drives. much thanks

Ignat:

thanks good info and makes sense. If I do end up go with the 3 partitions I'll just do it in Diskpart
My System SpecsSystem Spec
18 Dec 2011   #10
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

I think Ignat is right. You are better off to create those other partitions with Disk management. And do not forget the buffer dummy for possibla C extension because else you will have trouble later extending it.

Btw: why do you plan so many partitions on the SSD. Usually one would only have C and the rest (for user data) on the spinners. How big is this SSD.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Win 7 install on SSD




Thread Tools




Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:10 AM.
Twitter Facebook Google+



Windows 7 Forums

Seven Forums Android App Seven Forums IOS App
  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33