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Windows 7: Need 30,000' overview of installing an SSD alongside HDD in dv7-6100


30 Apr 2012   #1

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 
Need 30,000' overview of installing an SSD alongside HDD in dv7-6100

Hi, guys. I'm reading all these posts on this popular issue, and just wanted to confirm my high-level view of what it involves. This is on my HP dv7-6100.
1) Install SSD in empty 2nd slot (with special cable etc.)
2) Partition, format, and assign drive letter to SSD (is this necessary?)
3) Temporarily remove HDD (is this necessary?)
4) Perform fresh install of Win7HP64 on SSD (I hear this is preferable to copying/cloning the install from the HDD because Windows7 installs differently on a SSD than on an HDD... is that right?)
4a) validate Windows with information I copied from previous legit OEM install (call MS? use ABR?)
5) Put HDD back in, reboot, and... here it gets vague:
6) Back up the My Doc folder (and all other personal data if it's not in that folder)
7) REFORMAT the HDD, REINSTALL all programs
Or, 7b) do not reformat HDD, but somehow delete the Windows 7 install that's on it (or should I leave it on, just in case the SSD fails?)
8) Tell Windows that the MyDoc folder should be on the HDD, then restore all personal data to the HDD's My Documents folder...
Or 8b) Point Windows to the MyDoc folder on the HDD
9) Enjoy.
Have I got that all right?
I have another question: the HDD in this laptop has a total of three partitions - the main one (683gb), a RECOVERY partition (14.4gb) and an HP_TOOLS partition (98.8mb). HP_TOOLS seems to have something to do with updating the BIOS, and RECOVERY has this big, secret folder on it. I suppose it's invoked when you reboot and hit Fxx (where xx is whichever function key it is - I can't remember and I'm not going to reboot to check).
So my long winded question is this - when I turn the HDD into my "data" disc, should I just format the main partition and leave those others alone? Will they even work right when I install the SSD?
Anyone who answers... I'll be grateful for any insights, especially from more clueful owners of this same machine.
Thanks.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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30 Apr 2012   #2
Microsoft MVP

 

All of that isn't necessary when you can simply unplug the HD, plug SSD into first SATA port, boot the Windows 7 installer to Clean Reinstall - Factory OEM Windows 7.

After install move the User folder off of HD to wipe it with Diskpart Clean Command then partition it as a data drive in Disk Mgmt: Partition or Volume - Create New .

Move the data back into the new data partition in HD, then rightclick on each User folder to add it to the corresponding Library - Include a Folder - Windows 7 Forums which is much easier than moving the User folders to HD and avoid issues.

If you don't have the storage space to move the User folders off first then you can shrink C on the HD, Copy the User folders into a new partition you create there, then delete C to resize the data partition into it using free Partition Wizard bootable CD to Move/Resize Partition (Video Help).
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Apr 2012   #3

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 SP1, Home Premium, 64-bit
 
 

A few comments, in order of your list:

You don't have to uninstall the HDD, but you should disconnect or disable it. Do this BEFORE doing anything to the SSD.

A clean install is preferable on SSD for the same reasons it is preferable on HDD. There is nothing significantly different about installing to SSD rather than HDD. Imaging/cloning can work well, but isn't flawless. You have to decide (guess) if the time to be saved by cloning/imaging is worth the risk that the cloning/imaging won't work out as well as you hoped.

There is a slight chance you will have to call MS to activate, but it's relatively painless if you do. I don't know what ABR is.

Re step 6, backup: I'd make that step 1.

If you intend to use the HDD for storage, it should be reformatted, but I would not do that until I was satisfied that the SSD was in good working order with a validated Windows 7 installation.

Regarding your last question:

Make this step 2: burn a set of "recovery" DVDs that will restore your HP to factory specifications if need be. These disks serve the same purpose as the current recovery partition. Once you have a set of recovery disks, you don't need the recovery partition and can remove it.

I'm not sure if the HP tools partition should be kept. Most so-called "tools" can be replaced by downloadable tools, but there may be some peculiar reason to keep this partition--although I doubt it.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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30 Apr 2012   #4

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

These are great (and incredibly fast!) responses. Thanks.
Follow up question for Gregrocker: When you say to plug the SSD into the first SATA port, I take it you mean to put the SSD in the bay where the HDD lives now, and that the HDD will live in what is not the empty bay.
Right?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Apr 2012   #5
Microsoft MVP

 

You'd normally want the SSD plugged into SATA1. How that works in your drive bay I'm not sure. But if you look in Disk Mgmt you want it where the current DISK0 is plugged.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Apr 2012   #6

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 SP1, Home Premium, 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pbasch View Post
Follow up question for Gregrocker: When you say to plug the SSD into the first SATA port, I take it you mean to put the SSD in the bay where the HDD lives now, and that the HDD will live in what is not the empty bay.
Right?
Wrong.

"the first SATA port" is a reference to the location on the motherboard to which the SSD connects by cable.

Your motherboard probably has 4 or more SATA ports. Look in your manual.

Ideally, the C drive would be shown as "disk 0" in Windows Disk Management after the installation. "Disk 0" equates to 1 of your several SATA ports on the motherboard. Your manual may identify it or you may need a bit of trial and error.

You can operate with C as something other than disk 0---I have done so for years. But I understand it can be problematic in some circumstances. So try to get C on disk 0.

Ports have no connection at all to drive bays or where the drive is actually sitting in the case.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Apr 2012   #7

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 
Bays vs Ports

Right. I understand that. In my computer (a laptop, HP dv7-6100), the bays are kind of associated each with a cable and each cable with a port. If you switch them, the cables won't lay out properly. But I understand the distinction.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Need 30,000' overview of installing an SSD alongside HDD in dv7-6100




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