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Windows 7: Windows 7 "Does Not Like RAID?"

16 Apr 2014   #1

Win 7 Pro 64
 
 
Windows 7 "Does Not Like RAID?"

I am contemplating installing Windows 7 Professional x64 on a pair of 128Gb ssd's in RAID1 created using Intel's Rapid Storage Technology software.

In this thread,

New RAID Array and Clean Install Win7HP-Help with RAID Driver Install

10 Apr 2013 #13

gregrocker says:



"Is there a specific reason you want RAID, which Windows 7 doesn't much like?"


The thread seems to conclude with the OP being pleased with his installation.


Can anyone share experiences that support gregrocker's comment?


Thanks,


baumgrenze

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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16 Apr 2014   #2

Windows 8.1 Pro | Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit SP1
 
 

I agree with gregrocker. While you can raid ssd's and it might show good in benchmarks, real world wise you would be better off with just one 256 drive.

If one raid drive fails, you lost the total array. One drive is more reliable.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2014   #3

Windows 7 Home Premium 32 bit
 
 

RAID can certainly be used with Windows 7.
But the big question is why do you wish to use it?
RAID in any of it's forms is often misunderstood and used for the wrong reasons and without an understanding of the implications. That often leads to unfortunate results.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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16 Apr 2014   #4
Microsoft MVP

 

I wouldn't have made the comment had I not seen hundreds of cases of RAID not getting along with Windows 7 installation or repairs over the past five years of Windows 7's life. These are often the only cases where the normal installation, repair and rescue protocols - many of which were developed here - won't work no matter how they are tried.

You should start with what your goals are. If you're under the impression that RAID is a good backup solution then that is not practical since even in a mirror we have seen it fail. So you'd need backup via imaging and/or data backup anyway, which begs the question of what advantages RAID can offer.

The only good reason I've seen for using RAID is for working with huge files as with video editing, etc.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2014   #5
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

Greg is right. Especially with SSDs you really gain very little for the OS. The OS performance comes from the very fast access time of SSDs and that is the same - Raid or no Raid.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2014   #6
Microsoft MVP

Windows 7 Ultimate 32bit SP1
 
 

Raid didn't like my Vista Ultimate either .... Raid is too persnickety and is simply not worth the effort to use this type of set-up.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Apr 2014   #7

Win 7 Pro 64
 
 
RAID1 Not RAID0

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Dude View Post
I agree with gregrocker. While you can raid ssd's and it might show good in benchmarks, real world wise you would be better off with just one 256 drive.

If one raid drive fails, you lost the total array. One drive is more reliable.
First of all, I am thankful that there are enthusiasts who are willing to entertain my primitive questions based on only 30 years of computer use. After one Apple2+, bought mostly because the name appealed to my kids who had an interest, my first machine for personal use was one of Michael Dell's PC's Limited machines from back before he put his name on them. In truth, in 1968, I sat at a teletype console in Vancouver, BC, and wrote BASIC code to do math calculations that were performed on a GE timeshare mainframe in Los Angeles. The program was proofread, cut into punched paper tape to minimize the time it took to upload it, and then executed and the results were saved on punched tape. I guess that makes it 45-46 years.

I'm sorry. I'm not talking about RAID0 for speed. I'm talking about belt-and-suspenders RAID1. I've absorbed that it is not an effective backup solution. That said, in my limited experience RAID1 has given me good service for the last 6 years. I've replaced at least 2 failed drives, one for my OS/Programs and one for my data files. I was impressed that all I had to do was format the new drive and install it.

I confess, I'm not a gamer. I use my machine for tasks like writing, drafting, photo editing, audio editing, video editing. I see it as a tool. I guess that is why I feel a bit frustrated that the XP hammer I've used for years suddenly needs a new head. In my hands it still drove nails just fine. For my projects I certainly do not need an automatic nailer or a hammer with a confusing looking head that I need to learn how to use all over again. Finally someone else has decided that my hammer is no longer safe to use and I must replace it. It isn't any easier than it was to sell someone else my 1982 Isuzu diesel P'up a couple of years ago. I guess at my age (74) I'm more resistant to change.

I gather that RAID1 on Windows 7 will be more or less like RAID1 on XP. Please correct me if I am wrong.

Thanks,

baumgrenze
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Apr 2014   #8

XP/7x32-x64/8x64
 
 

Hi baumgrenze,

Are you installing the OS Windows 7 on the Raid device ? ... just curious.

I am planning a 5 disc NAS probably Raid5 for storing videos, photos, music and large AutoCad files.

Greg Rocker has bailed me out of some tough spots ... I resisted his ideas at first ... until my way did not work.

I have Windows 7 and my beloved mistress XP (and Win8) all workhorses. I have 2 XP rigs (autocad) that I am definitely clean installing Windows 7 (and downgrading a Win8 laptop back to Windows 7) -- when I get the time.

I am just a boy at 68 ... but the hard lesson I had to learn (I went down kicking and screaming) ... was that change is inevitable.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
26 Apr 2014   #9

Win 7 Pro 64
 
 

Thank you GrayGhost2

I've tried and failed. I will start a new thread to understand where I should go next. I think my question might get lost at the end of this thread.

Thanks,

baumgrenze
My System SpecsSystem Spec
27 Apr 2014   #10

Win 7 Pro 64
 
 
Failed Windows 7 Install - What To Do Next

I have a failed Windows 7 install. I want to learn from what went wrong to know what to do to achieve success next time.

I tried a custom installation on a pair of new Crucial M550 128Gb SSDs that I'd arrayed in a RAID1 using Intel Rapid Storage Technology Version 9.6.0.1014. (In 2010, GamePC of Palo Alto, the builder of my machine, installed this version and also upgraded the BIOS to F6, the most recent version.

The installation routine recognized the array but failed, perhaps for the lack of a proper driver. I am now prepared to try the installation on only one of the drives alone. The failure message from Microsoft is opaque.
“Windows could not complete the installation. To install Windows on this computer, restart the installation.”

I now have about 26.3 Gb of Windows files on the drives. Is there any point in looking at what is there to see where the install went wrong? Could I search them for missing drivers, for instance? I believe I can get a pretty good look using ZT-Win. Does it make sense for me to 'securely erase' the drive before I try the install again? I found this reference:

http://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-securely-erase-an-ssd-drive/

Am I correct that I will certainly need the driver for my ethernet NIC (Realtek RTL8168/8111 PCI-E Gigabit Ethernet NIC Realtek Semiconductor Corp.) My Windows 7 Upgrade Report suggested that I go to Realtek's website for the driver. I find a much more recent RT811 driver for Windows 7 x64 there than I found on the Gigabyte website. Which should I use?

Are there any other drivers that I need to have available on a thumb drive to install Windows 6 x64 or can all the others be added after the OS installation?

After I installed two
Crucial 4GB Kit (2GBx2) DDR2 (PC2-6400) DIMM 240-Pin Desktop Memory Modules (CT2KIT25664AA800) I reran Windows 7 Upgrade Report and find that it reports only 3.5 Gb of RAM. The system is still under XP/Pro SP3. I thought it should show 4 Gb?

I'm glad I can plug in my old OS/Programs drives and boot to XP until the system is stable under Win 7 as I'm not planning to do the Win 7 install on them.

Please add anything else you think I might have forgotten to supply. I'm a bit sleepy.

thanks

baumgrenze


System Specs

Board: Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd. GA-EP35-DS3P
Bus Clock: 266 megahertz
BIOS: Award Software International, Inc. F6 06/18/2009
1 x Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 (2.4 GHz) Quad Core
1 x CPU Retail Cooler
1 x Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3P Intel P35 ATX
2 x Crucial 4GB Kit (2GBx2) DDR2 (PC2-6400) DIMM 240-Pin Desktop Memory Modules CT2KIT25664AA800
1 x Western Digital Raptor 74GB 10,000 RPM (WDC WD740ADFD-00NLR5) SATA-1
1 x Western Digital Raptor 74GB 10,000 RPM (WDC WD740ADFS-00SLR5) SATA-2
1 x Western Digital Caviar 640 GB 7,200 RPM (WDC WD6400AAKS-00E4A0) SATA-2
1 x Western Digital Caviar 500 GB 7,200 RPM (WDC WD5000AAKS-00A7B0) SATA-2
1 x Sony Optiarc DVD RW AD-7241S
1 x Sapphire Radeon HD 3870 PCIe 512 MB Retail
2x Crucial M550 128GB SATA 2.5" 7mm (with 9.5mm adapter) Internal Solid State Drive CT128M550SSD1


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Windows 7 "Does Not Like RAID?"




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