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Windows 7: Install Stuck a 60% of last step


23 Dec 2009   #11

Windows 7 Ult, Windows 8.1 Pro,
 
 

Stuck at 60 percent hmmm, here is a suggestion that has worked for me on 4 different machines that were having the same problem. Clear the cmos, reset everything in bios back to how it was and then install Windows 7. Don't knock it until you try it.

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23 Dec 2009   #12
Microsoft MVP

 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by chev65 View Post
Stuck at 60 percent hmmm, here is a suggestion that has worked for me on 4 different machines that were having the same problem. Clear the cmos, reset everything in bios back to how it was and then install Windows 7. Don't knock it until you try it.
chev- I also would like to advise clearing CMOS more often, but it is extremely daunting and risky for people who may have never even been in their BIOS or opened their case before.

Perhaps you can provide a step-by-step tutorial so that the average person seeking help here can do it with the least risk involved.

It would be a great service, as all but the most experienced have no idea what it is otherwise.
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23 Dec 2009   #13
Microsoft MVP

Windows 7 Ultimate 32bit SP1
 
 

Here's a guide... 3 different ways to clear the CMOS
Clear CMOS - 3 Ways to Clear the CMOS - Reset BIOS
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23 Dec 2009   #14

Windows 7 Ult, Windows 8.1 Pro,
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by gregrocker View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by chev65 View Post
Stuck at 60 percent hmmm, here is a suggestion that has worked for me on 4 different machines that were having the same problem. Clear the cmos, reset everything in bios back to how it was and then install Windows 7. Don't knock it until you try it.
chev- I also would like to advise clearing CMOS more often, but it is extremely daunting and risky for people who may have never even been in their BIOS or opened their case before.

Perhaps you can provide a step-by-step tutorial so that the average person seeking help here can do it with the least risk involved.

It would be a great service, as all but the most experienced have no idea what it is otherwise.
Of course I know what all my bios settings are so it's easy for me.

I think I would either write down all the settings are just use a camera to take pics of every page and use it for reference.

Clearing the cmos has worked every single time I had installation problems with Windows 7 so it's worth a try.

Thanks for posting Greg and Jacee. Hopefully this will work for the Op.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Dec 2009   #15

Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit
 
 

Here's one I prepared earlier
I posted this a while back on another forum as a basic intro to the CMOS. Soz it's a bit long but maybe it will help to make it easier to understand for those that don't know

The BIOS is a key component of any system and is often overlooked. The correct settings can lead to a faster more stable system, but also changing the values to incorrect settings or pushing the clock speeds over the recommended limits could result in disaster. So please take extra care when changing any values in the CMOS. If you do make a mistake or want to start again just load the Default values. (Some boards may require you to change a jumper on your mother board to do a hard reset - check your manual)

BIOS (Basic Input and Output System) includes a CMOS SETUP utility which allows users to configure required settings or to activate certain system features.
When the power is turned off, the battery on the motherboard supplies the necessary power to the CMOS.
When the power is turned on, pressing the key (some boards use the F keys) during the BIOS POST (Power-On Self Test) will take you to the CMOS SETUP screen.



The BIOS Setup menus described here are for reference only and may differ from the exact settings for your motherboard.

Some CMOS settings have a hidden feature to access more advanced options, on gigabyte boards it can be accessed by pressing ctrl +F1. This is especially usefull for those that like to overclock, but as this is a basic guide, I won't be going into this area.

The standard CMOS features consists of basic settings were you can adjust the time/date, set your drives up, and set up halt errors.
For the drive selection its best to set to [auto]. And [none] on the channels where you know there is no drive connected. (tip if you hit enter on each channel it will auto detect the device connected)
Not many people have a Floppy drive anymore so you can set this to [none]
Set Halt on to [no errors] (speeds up POST boot time)

Cool and quiet (if you have this option) can be left on [auto] if you run your PC in a standard config with no OC. If you do OC a bit set it to [disable] This means that your CPU cooler will run at full speed all the time. (You can still adjust your fan speed manually if you have fan controllers)
Boot priority is used when you have more than one Hard Dicks connected and you need to select the sequence of the drives. (Operating system Drive First)
1st to 3rd Boot device is used when installing your OS. On first installation set this to 1st Boot device [CDROM] 2nd [Hard Disk] & 3rd to [Disabled] After your OS is setup change this to 1st [Hard Disk] 2nd [Disabled] 3rd [Disabled]
Set Floppy Seek to [Disabled]
Leave the password option (unless your worried about your little brother messing about)
SMART, although this uses a small amount of resources this is best set [enabled] This option could give you an early warning to a Hard Disk that's about to kick the bucket.
Away Mode is really only for Windows XP Media Center. (This allows the system to silently perform unattended tasks while in a low-power mode)
Display first is used for changing whether you want to use the on board graphics display or your big old shiny gaming card. Set it to [PEG] or [PCI express] for a add on card. Set it to [PCI] or [On board] to use the built in VGA. (Some boards have an [Auto] option)

ATA RAID config is where you set your drives to run as a standard drive in ATA mode or RAID mode where you might be wanting to set up a redundancy config (used to replicate data among multiple hard drives) As this is also quite involved I'll skip this bit. ATA mode will suffice for most configs.
IDE channel is to enable/disable the onboard first channel IDE port. (if you have this option)
Mac lan is used to enable/disable the Network controller built-in core chipset.
Serial ATA controller is used enable /disable your SATA drives.
Prefetch mode is the data buffer to enhance hard drive transfer speeds
Audio Function is used to enable/disable your onboard audio chipset.
SMART lan is used for testing status of the attached LAN cable
OB 1394 is for a firewire connection
OB Lan boot is used to invoke the boot ROM of the onboard LAN chip. Set to [Disabled]
OB serial & parallel ports. Set both of these to [disabled] Most printers are USB nowadays and we very rarely use com ports anymore.
On-chip USB used to disable/enable USB
USB keyboard and mouse support set these to [enabled]
Legacy USB this option allows users to decide whether to detect USB storage devices, including USB flash drives and USB hard drives during POST

ACPI leave this option to [S1(POS)] (power on suspend)
Soft off you can set this to [Instant-Off] This means that when in windows pressing the power button will Power off instantly (same as clicking "start" "shutdown")
PME set to [enabled] (this is an ATX PSU requirement that supplies 1A to the 5v lead)
Modem Ring on is an option that allows you to wake up the PC remotely via the modem. Set this to [disabled]
USB resume this just allows you to wake up the system from a USB device
Power on alarm allows you to automatically start up the system daily by setting time/day/date etc.
Power on mouse/key/pass this allows you to power up the system using these devices
AC back allows the system to auto power up after a power loss

You can leave PnP/PCI Configurations set to [Auto]

Case open set this to [disabled]
The next few options are just information and cannot be changed
CPU warning Temp it is advisable to set this to a value of between 60oC / 140oF and 90oC / 194oF. If the system reaches the threshold then it will automatically shut down to protect itself from further damage.
CPU Fan fail set this to [enabled]
Power/System Fan fail set this to [enabled] (if you have one)
CPU SMART When this function is enabled, CPU fan will run at different speed depending on CPU temperature

As I said earlier I won't be covering these settings as this is for more advanced users
The incorrect use these features may result in system instability or corruption.
Doing a overclock or overvoltage on CPU, chipsets and memory modules may result in
damages or shortened life expectancy to these components. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED !!

Fail-Safe defaults contain the most appropriate values of the system parameters that allow minimum system performance.
Optimized defaults loads the factory defaults for BIOS and Chipset Features which the system automatically detects.
Setting the supervisor password will prompt you to enter a password. This stops any one from changing any values without your knowledge
Save and exit does what it says.

Hope this gives a better understanding for those that have wanted to know what some of the settings are in the old scary BIOS
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 Install Stuck a 60% of last step




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