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Windows 7: Encoding Speed


10 Jan 2011   #1

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 
Encoding Speed

I have noticed that the encoding speed varies widely, while encoding from a DVD. So far I have experienced anywhere from 60 FPS to 279 FPS. This can not be due to disk condition or hardware/software in use, because with all of these being equal, the speed is quite different with each disk.

I suppose that it is possible that the type of encryption involved might be a factor, but I don't feel that it is. This leaves only one thing to come to mind...The encoding software that I'm using has settings for bit rate or file size, which varies with each disk, without me changing anything. I sort of understand the file size setting, but I'm quite unclear about bit rate.

Since the frame rate is a separate setting, which is never changed, obviously bit rate and frame rate do not relate to each other. This leaves the question of exactly what bit rate effects? Will changing the bit rate to a higher number cause the encoding to finish faster, or does that simply effect the amount of data within each frame, thus bearing on the image quality?

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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10 Jan 2011   #2

ultimate 64 sp1
 
 

you've got it right - it simply effects the amount of data within each frame - it's the rate that bits are being used up.

low bit rate = only a few bits (or kilobytes) used for each frame (or second) = crummy pixellated boxy picture

i'm not sure what bearing it would have on encoding speed - i suppose at a high bit rate there's more data to process and store, so it may take longer. i reckon it's relatively easier to do a 'quick and dirty' rip than a hi-q one.

you've also noticed that different discs encode at different speeds. there are many variables at play here, one of them being that a fast action movie with lots of motion and movement in each frame would need more data and more work (and hence time) to encode than a slow film where things don't move that much.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
10 Jan 2011   #3

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

I did consider the amount of action within a scene, but that didn't seem to account for the differences, because with two disks of about the same quality, action, etc. they do not necessarily encode at similar speeds. I'm simply trying to determine if there is anything that I can do, that would speedup the chore, without degrading the output?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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10 Jan 2011   #4

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

If you are using the same setting for everything ..
My guess would be that the ones that take longer are being de-interlaced.


A few things can impact the encoding time.

1 being if the Video needs to be de-interlaced. De-Interlacing a Interlaced Video adds a little extra time vs encoding a Progressive Source.
Since A Progressive Source just starts being encoded ... Interlaced Sources must go through the De-Interlace process first.

Next would be if you're resizing. This depends on resizer used and how much its being changed. Usually not a huge impact though at DVD resolutions.

And then what settings the encoder is actually using.

The main setting that affects the overall quality the most, would be Bit Rate.
Higher rates take a bit longer to encode as well, but Higher bit rates usully have better looking results.

But although higher bit rates may add bit of time to your encoding, it should be fairly consistant (time wise)for each video you encode at the same settings.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
10 Jan 2011   #5

ultimate 64 sp1
 
 

i wonder if some discs are simply able to be read faster?

quality of source discs? some discs are 1x, 2x, 4x etc....multilayer?

how much time is actually spent reading the data off the disc, compared to actually encoding and writing it?

how fragmented was your hard drive during ripping?

different discs are also compressed by differing amounts in the first place.

lots of other factors too i'm sure, i haven't ripped for a while.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
10 Jan 2011   #6

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Wishmaster,

I'm using default setting for everything. therefore the only differences would be those caused by what is set by the source itself. Generally, the speed of encoding doesn't vary much on one disk, regardless of the type of action going on at the time. The big differences is from disk to disk. As far as interlacing goes, I do remember a checkbox for enabling/disabling it on another encoder that I have installed, but don't remember it on the one that I'm using.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
10 Jan 2011   #7

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

I believe a DL DVD does indeed have a slower read rate. It depends on the drive itself.


What you can try to know for sure.

Just use the copy disc feature, and rip the entire dvd as it is to your HD.
Then use the program to open that folder, (it should view it as a DVD) and encode that way. Should be much faster.

Personally,I always rip to the entire disc to the HD first, then work with it for encoding.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
10 Jan 2011   #8

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Wishmaster View Post
I believe a DL DVD does indeed have a slower read rate. It depends on the drive itself.


What you can try to know for sure.

Just use the copy disc feature, and rip the entire dvd as it is to your HD.
Then use the program to open that folder, (it should view it as a DVD) and encode that way. Should be much faster.

Personally,I always rip to the entire disc to the HD first, then work with it for encoding.
That might be good for a learning experience, but it would defeat the purpose of speeding up the chore at hand, so I doubt that I will do so.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
10 Jan 2011   #9

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Joules View Post
Anydvd to the rescue! On a more serious note though seeker unreadable cells are what is causing the speed difference and what they call dvd structure protection, makes it even worse but Anydvd, DVDFab, should remove that when you rip to hard drive and it will be smooth sailing from there...
Actually, the program that I'm using is DVDFab. I'm somewhat familiar with AnyDVD, but I thought that it's primary purpose was to eliminate the need for a Blu Ray Player. I didn't know that it had ripping abilities.

I will be looking for a different ripper soon, because ~20% of my DVDs would not work with DVDFab, even though I know that they are playable. On a couple of them, after the encoder analyzed the disk, it did not find the main video file, but the majority of the time it did, but was not able to work with it. The FPS would start to increase, then drop back down to nearly zero, without producing anything in the preview pane.

The problem is, that most other encoder that I have found, are less intuitive, and seem over my head, or they are expensive, and over my pocketbook.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Jan 2011   #10

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

It actually does speed up the process though. Since it can read and analyse the disc from the HD much, much faster than from the disc.

If Im not mistaken, the Decrypter part of DVD Fab is free correct?
So you can rip the entire disc of just full movie to your HD.

I do not think DVDFAb has the capability of decrypting on the fly however.
AnyDVD for example, is a driver the runs in real time while you play a movie (DVD or BD).
(I could be mistaken here)


There are other alternatives, that are free such as MEGUI or Handbrake for the actual encoding process one the movie is on the HD.

I know there can seem to be alot to learn when it comes to Video Encoding.
But honestly, it isn't as complicated as it seems to be, once you start getting the hang of it.

The big thing with setting up the encoder yourself (at least IMHO) is the trial and error stage.

And by that I mean, finding what settings look good to you, and are worth the encoding time to achieve.

This may take a few trial and error test runs to find your personal preference, but in the end its worth it I think, and you do learn alot about the encoder settings.

I would try a couple encodes with MeGUI, using its DXVA preset and a1600bit rate or so to start with.
Not much to deal with encoder settings that way to get started. You may find you like it much better, than again maybe not.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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