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Windows 7: password protected network share

25 Sep 2010   #1
joshthegooglist

7 Home premium
 
 
password protected network share

i have a server at my business running windows server 2000 (yes i know i should upgrade, but im making use of equipment we have) with a network share that requires a user name and password to access the share. Within the building there are about 50 computers with OS's ranging from windows 2000 to windows 7. Ive tried logging on with all the machines, but the windows 7 machines will not accept my credentials. under the unsername and password fields it shows the domain as the local computer name. What we have is a workgroup based setup, so aside from upgrading the server OS, is there anything i can do to access this share from the windows 7 machines?

Thanx
-JP


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
25 Sep 2010   #2
zigzag3143

Win 8 Release candidate 8400
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by joshthegooglist View Post
i have a server at my business running windows server 2000 (yes i know i should upgrade, but im making use of equipment we have) with a network share that requires a user name and password to access the share. Within the building there are about 50 computers with OS's ranging from windows 2000 to windows 7. Ive tried logging on with all the machines, but the windows 7 machines will not accept my credentials. under the unsername and password fields it shows the domain as the local computer name. What we have is a workgroup based setup, so aside from upgrading the server OS, is there anything i can do to access this share from the windows 7 machines?

Thanx
-JP

Is it a full drive share ($C:\)?

Are you using homegroup on the win 7 machine, or more importantly are you using IPv6?


Ken J
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Sep 2010   #3
joshthegooglist

7 Home premium
 
 

1) no
2) no
3) ipv6 is not disabled on the 7 machine if thats what u are asking
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

25 Sep 2010   #4
chev65

Windows 7 Ult, Windows 8.1 Pro,
 
 

This requires that you change the lanman server parameters in order to get Windows 7 working with older servers. Do these adjustments on the Windows 7 machines that need to connect to the server.

Control Panel - Administrative Tools - Local Security Policy

Local Policies - Security Options

Network security: LAN Manager authentication level
Set to Send LM & NTLM responses only

Set the Minimum session security for NTLM SSP
Disable Require 128-bit encryption

The screen shots below should be helpful.

Reboot all machines after making the adjustment.

This has nothing to do with IPv6.

The Argument against Disabling IPv6
It is unfortunate that some organizations disable IPv6 on their computers running Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008, where it is installed and enabled by default. Many disable IPv6-based on the assumption that they are not running any applications or services that use it. Others might disable it because of a misperception that having both IPv4 and IPv6 enabled effectively doubles their DNS and Web traffic. This is not true.
From Microsoft's perspective, IPv6 is a mandatory part of the Windows operating system and it is enabled and included in standard Windows service and application testing during the operating system development process. Because Windows was designed specifically with IPv6 present, Microsoft does not perform any testing to determine the effects of disabling IPv6. If IPv6 is disabled on Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, or later versions, some components will not function. Moreover, applications that you might not think are using IPv6—such as Remote Assistance, HomeGroup, DirectAccess, and Windows Mail—could be.
Therefore, Microsoft recommends that you leave IPv6 enabled, even if you do not have an IPv6-enabled network, either native or tunneled. By leaving IPv6 enabled, you do not disable IPv6-only applications and services (for example, HomeGroup in Windows 7 and DirectAccess in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 are IPv6-only) and your hosts can take advantage of IPv6-enhanced connectivity.

Read more. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/m....cableguy.aspx


Attached Thumbnails
password protected network share-lanman-server-adjustment.png   password protected network share-require-128-bit-encryption-unchecked.png  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Sep 2010   #5
joshthegooglist

7 Home premium
 
 

thanks ill give that a try and let you know
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Sep 2010   #6
joshthegooglist

7 Home premium
 
 

##### RESOLVED. Thank you very much chev65
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Sep 2010   #7
WindowsStar

Windows 7 Enterprise (x64); Windows Server 2008 R2 (x64)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by chev65 View Post

The Argument against Disabling IPv6
It is unfortunate that some organizations disable IPv6 on their computers running Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008, where it is installed and enabled by default. Many disable IPv6-based on the assumption that they are not running any applications or services that use it. Others might disable it because of a misperception that having both IPv4 and IPv6 enabled effectively doubles their DNS and Web traffic. This is not true.
From Microsoft's perspective, IPv6 is a mandatory part of the Windows operating system and it is enabled and included in standard Windows service and application testing during the operating system development process. Because Windows was designed specifically with IPv6 present, Microsoft does not perform any testing to determine the effects of disabling IPv6. If IPv6 is disabled on Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, or later versions, some components will not function. Moreover, applications that you might not think are using IPv6—such as Remote Assistance, HomeGroup, DirectAccess, and Windows Mail—could be.
Therefore, Microsoft recommends that you leave IPv6 enabled, even if you do not have an IPv6-enabled network, either native or tunneled. By leaving IPv6 enabled, you do not disable IPv6-only applications and services (for example, HomeGroup in Windows 7 and DirectAccess in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 are IPv6-only) and your hosts can take advantage of IPv6-enhanced connectivity.
+1
My System SpecsSystem Spec
26 Sep 2010   #8
chev65

Windows 7 Ult, Windows 8.1 Pro,
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by joshthegooglist View Post
##### RESOLVED. Thank you very much chev65
I'm glad that worked for you josh. Thanks for reporting back in.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
26 Sep 2010   #9
chev65

Windows 7 Ult, Windows 8.1 Pro,
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by WindowsStar View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by chev65 View Post

The Argument against Disabling IPv6
It is unfortunate that some organizations disable IPv6 on their computers running Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008, where it is installed and enabled by default. Many disable IPv6-based on the assumption that they are not running any applications or services that use it. Others might disable it because of a misperception that having both IPv4 and IPv6 enabled effectively doubles their DNS and Web traffic. This is not true.
From Microsoft's perspective, IPv6 is a mandatory part of the Windows operating system and it is enabled and included in standard Windows service and application testing during the operating system development process. Because Windows was designed specifically with IPv6 present, Microsoft does not perform any testing to determine the effects of disabling IPv6. If IPv6 is disabled on Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, or later versions, some components will not function. Moreover, applications that you might not think are using IPv6—such as Remote Assistance, HomeGroup, DirectAccess, and Windows Mail—could be.
Therefore, Microsoft recommends that you leave IPv6 enabled, even if you do not have an IPv6-enabled network, either native or tunneled. By leaving IPv6 enabled, you do not disable IPv6-only applications and services (for example, HomeGroup in Windows 7 and DirectAccess in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 are IPv6-only) and your hosts can take advantage of IPv6-enhanced connectivity.
+1
It just had to be said, there is more to the IPv6 protocol than meets the eye.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
26 Sep 2010   #10
WindowsStar

Windows 7 Enterprise (x64); Windows Server 2008 R2 (x64)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by chev65 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by WindowsStar View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by chev65 View Post

The Argument against Disabling IPv6
It is unfortunate that some organizations disable IPv6 on their computers running Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008, where it is installed and enabled by default. Many disable IPv6-based on the assumption that they are not running any applications or services that use it. Others might disable it because of a misperception that having both IPv4 and IPv6 enabled effectively doubles their DNS and Web traffic. This is not true.
From Microsoft's perspective, IPv6 is a mandatory part of the Windows operating system and it is enabled and included in standard Windows service and application testing during the operating system development process. Because Windows was designed specifically with IPv6 present, Microsoft does not perform any testing to determine the effects of disabling IPv6. If IPv6 is disabled on Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, or later versions, some components will not function. Moreover, applications that you might not think are using IPv6—such as Remote Assistance, HomeGroup, DirectAccess, and Windows Mail—could be.
Therefore, Microsoft recommends that you leave IPv6 enabled, even if you do not have an IPv6-enabled network, either native or tunneled. By leaving IPv6 enabled, you do not disable IPv6-only applications and services (for example, HomeGroup in Windows 7 and DirectAccess in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 are IPv6-only) and your hosts can take advantage of IPv6-enhanced connectivity.
+1
It just had to be said, there is more to the IPv6 protocol than meets the eye.
Again I completely agree. Thanks for your great posts.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 password protected network share




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