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Windows 7: IPV6toIPV4 Adapters Galore


13 Oct 2010   #1

win 7 X64 Ultimate SP1
 
 
IPV6toIPV4 Adapters Galore

Every time I boot a "IPV6toIpV4 adapter" is added in my device tree. Is IPv6 necessary at this time? What is wrong with my Marvell Lan controller that this happens? Am I missing some tweak?


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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13 Oct 2010   #2

Windows 7 Ult, Windows 8.1 Pro,
 
 

I havn't a clue on why this happens but I think it's a driver problem of some sort. You can delate those extra adaptors by going into device manage go to view then choose "show hidden devices" delate them all and a new one will be made but it should not be making one everytime you reboot.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Oct 2010   #3

win 7 X64 Ultimate SP1
 
 
Drivers

Drivers are not the problem, Unless the latest driver is at fault also. I just installed Marvells latest (Ver 11.30.1.3 dated 9/15/2010). It maybe the driver anyhoo.

I deleted 73 adapters from the device tree. As I reboot they are begining to come back. Is some of the addressing we are using on the web now in the IPV6 format?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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13 Oct 2010   #4

Windows 7 Ult, Windows 8.1 Pro,
 
 

The IPv6 protocol is only used on the LAN with Windows 7 so it's not used to get to websites.

The Argument against Disabling IPv6
It is unfortunate that some organizations disable IPv6 on their computers running Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008, where it is installed and enabled by default. Many disable IPv6-based on the assumption that they are not running any applications or services that use it. Others might disable it because of a misperception that having both IPv4 and IPv6 enabled effectively doubles their DNS and Web traffic. This is not true.
From Microsoft's perspective, IPv6 is a mandatory part of the Windows operating system and it is enabled and included in standard Windows service and application testing during the operating system development process. Because Windows was designed specifically with IPv6 present, Microsoft does not perform any testing to determine the effects of disabling IPv6. If IPv6 is disabled on Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, or later versions, some components will not function. Moreover, applications that you might not think are using IPv6—such as Remote Assistance, HomeGroup, DirectAccess, and Windows Mail—could be.
Therefore, Microsoft recommends that you leave IPv6 enabled, even if you do not have an IPv6-enabled network, either native or tunneled. By leaving IPv6 enabled, you do not disable IPv6-only applications and services (for example, HomeGroup in Windows 7 and DirectAccess in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 are IPv6-only) and your hosts can take advantage of IPv6-enhanced connectivity.

Read more. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/m....cableguy.aspx
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Oct 2010   #5

Windows 7 Enterprise (x64); Windows Server 2008 R2 (x64)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by chev65 View Post
The IPv6 protocol is only used on the LAN with Windows 7 so it's not used to get to websites.

The Argument against Disabling IPv6
It is unfortunate that some organizations disable IPv6 on their computers running Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008, where it is installed and enabled by default. Many disable IPv6-based on the assumption that they are not running any applications or services that use it. Others might disable it because of a misperception that having both IPv4 and IPv6 enabled effectively doubles their DNS and Web traffic. This is not true.
From Microsoft's perspective, IPv6 is a mandatory part of the Windows operating system and it is enabled and included in standard Windows service and application testing during the operating system development process. Because Windows was designed specifically with IPv6 present, Microsoft does not perform any testing to determine the effects of disabling IPv6. If IPv6 is disabled on Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, or later versions, some components will not function. Moreover, applications that you might not think are using IPv6—such as Remote Assistance, HomeGroup, DirectAccess, and Windows Mail—could be.
Therefore, Microsoft recommends that you leave IPv6 enabled, even if you do not have an IPv6-enabled network, either native or tunneled. By leaving IPv6 enabled, you do not disable IPv6-only applications and services (for example, HomeGroup in Windows 7 and DirectAccess in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 are IPv6-only) and your hosts can take advantage of IPv6-enhanced connectivity.

Read more. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/m....cableguy.aspx

Again +1
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Oct 2010   #6

Windows 7 Ult, Windows 8.1 Pro,
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by WindowsStar View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by chev65 View Post
The IPv6 protocol is only used on the LAN with Windows 7 so it's not used to get to websites.

The Argument against Disabling IPv6
It is unfortunate that some organizations disable IPv6 on their computers running Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008, where it is installed and enabled by default. Many disable IPv6-based on the assumption that they are not running any applications or services that use it. Others might disable it because of a misperception that having both IPv4 and IPv6 enabled effectively doubles their DNS and Web traffic. This is not true.
From Microsoft's perspective, IPv6 is a mandatory part of the Windows operating system and it is enabled and included in standard Windows service and application testing during the operating system development process. Because Windows was designed specifically with IPv6 present, Microsoft does not perform any testing to determine the effects of disabling IPv6. If IPv6 is disabled on Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, or later versions, some components will not function. Moreover, applications that you might not think are using IPv6—such as Remote Assistance, HomeGroup, DirectAccess, and Windows Mail—could be.
Therefore, Microsoft recommends that you leave IPv6 enabled, even if you do not have an IPv6-enabled network, either native or tunneled. By leaving IPv6 enabled, you do not disable IPv6-only applications and services (for example, HomeGroup in Windows 7 and DirectAccess in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 are IPv6-only) and your hosts can take advantage of IPv6-enhanced connectivity.

Read more. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/m....cableguy.aspx

Again +1
LOL, seems like nobody knows what IPv6 is used for so I just keep posting up the relevant facts about it.

Although I havn't a clue on why the OP is having this problem I have seen this problem before but havn't found anything conclusive on how to fix it yet.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Oct 2010   #7

win 7 X64 Ultimate SP1
 
 
Suggestions?

I have two of these rigs. MoBo's are identical. One rig is not adding these "adapters". The driver for the Marvell Lans on that one is 11.22.3.9 9/28/2009. I am looking for the inf file with that driver. I think that driver came with the early versions of windows 7. (oeminf5? something on that order). Its a 32 bit driver but it is working well on my 64 bit machine. I can find references to the file doing searches but can't find a download.

I have those file and drivers on the other rig. If I can figure out how to find them. It will take a *.inf and one or two other files. If I can find the inf the files needed will be listed in it.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Oct 2010   #8

Windows 7 Ult, Windows 8.1 Pro,
 
 

The Asus support site shows this for your LAN driver> Marvell Yukon Gigabit Ethernet Driver V11.10.5.3 for 32/64bit Windows 7.(WHQL)

There are also some very recent bios updates 9/10/2010 for your board at the Asus site.

ASUSTeK Computer Inc.-Support-

I can only hope that you don't have the dreaded bonjour service installed.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Oct 2010   #9

win 7 X64 Ultimate SP1
 
 
Asus Drivers

I have copies of the Asus drivers and my bios are up to date.

Bonjour Service? Is that anything like Adios MF?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Oct 2010   #10

Windows 7 Pro 64
 
 

Quote:
Therefore, Microsoft recommends that you leave IPv6 enabled, even if you do not have an IPv6-enabled network, either native or tunneled. By leaving IPv6 enabled, you do not disable IPv6-only applications and services (for example, Home Group in Windows 7 and Direct Access in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 are IPv6-only) and your hosts can take advantage of IPv6-enhanced connectivity.
Of course if you are not using any of the fore-mentioned services then disabling can't really hurt anything either.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 IPV6toIPV4 Adapters Galore




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