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Windows 7: IPv6 and static IPv4 address


21 Nov 2010   #1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 
IPv6 and static IPv4 address

Hi,

I like to know whether is Windows 7 has a bug on IPv6 and IPv4.

If I left IPv6 setting on on my NIC adaptor, I am unable to keep my own static IPv4 address after I config it and I restart my PC. On the other hand, I switched IPv6 off on my NIC, then I am enable to set up my own static IP address without reseting it when i restart my PC.

So is this known bug or is my own static IP address supposed not to function when I switch IPv6 on?

Thanks kindly in advance

M


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

21 Nov 2010   #2

Operating System : Windows 7 Home Premium Edition 6.01.7600 SP1 (x64)
 
 

Repairing Your TCP/IP Configuration
If you suspect a problem with your TCP/IP configuration, try either of the following repair options:
●●Use the automated repair option. Right-click the connection icon in Network Connections and click Diagnose.
●●Renew your IP address. Use the ipconfig /renew command to renew your IPv4 address from the DHCP server; use ipconfig /renew6 to renew the IPv6 address.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Nov 2010   #3

Operating System : Windows 7 Home Premium Edition 6.01.7600 SP1 (x64)
 
 

Understanding IPv6



Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is a network layer that is designed to overcome
shortcomings of the original Internet Protocol, IPv4. (That’s right; the first version was
dubbed IPv4, and the second version is IPv6.) The most significant difference is the
much larger address space. The 32-bit IPv4 addressing scheme provides for a theoretical
maximum of approximately 4 billion unique addresses, which seemed like a lot
when the internet and Internet Protocol were conceived nearly three decades ago.
(Because of the way IP addresses are allocated, the actual number in use is far less.) As a
stopgap measure to overcome the limited number of IP addresses, private IP addresses
and Network Address Translation were implemented, because this system allows a large
number of computers to share a single public IP address.

There will be no shortage of addresses with IPv6, which uses 128-bit addresses—providing
a pool of 3.4 ◊ 1038 addresses. (That’s over 50 octillion addresses for every
person on earth. Not many people have that many computers and other electronic
devices, each of which will ultimately be reachable by its IPv6 address.)
Although NAT has been promoted as a security measure that shields networked computers
behind a NAT firewall from external attack—which it does reasonably well—the
security benefit was largely an afterthought; its real raison d’Ítre is to ease the address
shortage. IPv6 brings true security improvements, achieving the long-sought goal of
security implemented at the network layer level; standards-based Internet Protocol
security (IPsec) support is part of every IPv6 protocol suite.

Other improvements in IPv6 include easier configuration and more efficient routing.
Unfortunately, although IPv6 is being rapidly rolled out in many Asian countries, its
adoption in the West is likely to take many years. Full implementation requires not only
support at the host operating system—which we now have in Windows 7, Windows
Server 2008, and other recent versions of Windows—but application and hardware
support as well, including the routers that tie together the various nodes of the internet
and the firewalls that keep them apart. Replacing the existing hardware (not just
routers, but also printers and other network-connected devices) and other infrastructure
will require huge investment and much time.

Until the transition to IPv6 is complete many years hence, you can gain several of its
benefits with Windows 7. Today, computers running Windows 7 can communicate over
IPv4 and IPv6 networks at the same time. This means that if your local area network
(or your ISP) supports IPv6, Windows will use it because IPv6 is the primary protocol in
Windows 7. You can also access IPv6 websites and other resources even if the intervening
network infrastructure doesn’t support IPv6, because Windows will automatically
fall back to a tunneling system such as Teredo. (Teredo is an IPv6 transition technology
that allows end-to-end communication using IPv6 addresses; NAT translation tables on
Teredo client computers allow it to communicate through routers that use NAT. Other
tunneling systems effectively embed IPv6 data in IPv4 packets.)

While you wait for the transition to IPv6 to be complete, you can find plenty of
detailed information about IPv6 at the Microsoft IPv6 website, microsoft.com/ipv6. And
if you really want the details, we recommend Understanding IPv6, Second Edition, by
Joseph Davies (Microsoft Press, 2008).
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


21 Nov 2010   #4

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Thank you for fast response. My internet connection works just fine either IPv6 on or off. It just the static IPv4 address is reseting often when I restart my PC. If I ignore static IPs and go for dynamic IPs for my PC, then it shouldn't be a problem.

Is possible to have static IPv4 address(without resetting it when I switch my PC on) when I can switch IPv6 on for my NIC adaptor? yes or no will sufficient, no need to write a long article to answer ambiguously my question.

Thanks kindly in advance

M
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Nov 2010   #5

Operating System : Windows 7 Home Premium Edition 6.01.7600 SP1 (x64)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrknownothing View Post
Thank you for fast response. My internet connection works just fine either IPv6 on or off. It just the static IPv4 address is reseting often when I restart my PC. If I ignore static IPs and go for dynamic IPs for my PC, then it shouldn't be a problem.

Is possible to have static IPv4 address(without resetting it when I switch my PC on) when I can switch IPv6 on for my NIC adaptor? yes or no will sufficient, no need to write a long article to answer ambiguously my question.

Thanks kindly in advance

M
i think not but will research this for you
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Nov 2010   #6

Operating System : Windows 7 Home Premium Edition 6.01.7600 SP1 (x64)
 
 

have a read here Managing IP Addresses
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 IPv6 and static IPv4 address




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