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Windows 7: Network Users Permissions

22 Dec 2010   #1

Windows 7 x64
 
 
Network Users Permissions

Hello everyone, nice forum to be in!

My question is about how I can set the permissions for the users on a network that
All have windows 7 x64 on their PCs?

Let me make it more clear:
I am not using Home group function of win 7 and if we have 4-6 PCs that have access
to number of shared folders on one of another PCs, We named that computer "Server" and we want to use it as the main place for storing files that come from other users on the network(All on a Server PC). The root folder has several subfolders.
Now How can I set the permissions for those subfolder the way that some users ON the network can have access to them and others not?

I have tried to add the users (user names) that exist on the network (and not on the local machine) to permission with no luck, windows can't find them because it only searches the local PC for the specified user and not the entire network machines.

Again, How can I do that?

Thanks in advance

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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22 Dec 2010   #2

Windows 7 Enterprise (x64); Windows Server 2008 R2 (x64)
 
 

Are you using 10 machines or less total?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Dec 2010   #3

Windows 7 Ult, Windows 8.1 Pro,
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Vista Hunter View Post
Hello everyone, nice forum to be in!

My question is about how I can set the permissions for the users on a network that
All have windows 7 x64 on their PCs?

Let me make it more clear:
I am not using Home group function of win 7 and if we have 4-6 PCs that have access
to number of shared folders on one of another PCs, We named that computer "Server" and we want to use it as the main place for storing files that come from other users on the network(All on a Server PC). The root folder has several subfolders.
Now How can I set the permissions for those subfolder the way that some users ON the network can have access to them and others not?

I have tried to add the users (user names) that exist on the network (and not on the local machine) to permission with no luck, windows can't find them because it only searches the local PC for the specified user and not the entire network machines.

Again, How can I do that?

Thanks in advance
The problem here is that you can't just add a User name to the "shared with" list. It does'nt work like that "and believe me I wish it did". I havn't had to mess with these settings myself so do not know the exact step by step process for this although the tutorial in the link below shows you how.

In order to share with an individual user you need to create a seperate User group on your machine then share with the intended "special User" through that User group.

It's best to make this a standard "non Admin" User account. In other words the only way to safely share files with an individual user is to share only through this special account effectivly creating a barrier between the special share account and the other Users.

Permissions - Allow or Deny Users and Groups
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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24 Dec 2010   #4

Windows 7 x64
 
 

Quote:
Originally posted by: "WindowsStar"
Are you using 10 machines or less total?
I'm using less than 10 machines on the network but in future, They may become more than 10.

Thanks "chev65" but I currently figured out those dialog boxes and already have set them for the proper users on the machines... But my problem is that how I can do those steps for the Network users, they aren't listed on these dialog boxes and I can't simply add them as I said earlier in my post!

So If I need to create a group of, for example network users to set the permissions for them on
server drive, how can I do that?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
24 Dec 2010   #5

Windows 7 Enterprise (x64); Windows Server 2008 R2 (x64)
 
 

@Vista Hunter

The reason I asked is that once you start having 50 or more machines, it becomes much better to setup a Domain and use AD for your users. Things like access to applications, network shares, data, etc. all become easy to manage.

In your case you may be getting complex enough to consider a Domain. I would hate to go through a bunch of work to set things up and then you start adding more machines and have to keep going through the same pain.

We can however do what you feel is best. Let me know. I can as well as many others give you help with setting up the Domain.

If you don't want to set up a Domain then we can work on the original issue. -WS
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Dec 2010   #6

Windows 7 x64
 
 

Thanks "WindowsStar" for your quick reply, I don't think that we have up to 50 Computers in near future, but I feel setting a domain despite of its pain can be really helpful and give us the full control which we've tried to get over the network computers and users...
So lets go that way
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Dec 2010   #7

Windows 7 Enterprise (x64); Windows Server 2008 R2 (x64)
 
 

@Vista Hunter

Awesome! Once you get AD going you will be extremely happy!!!

What you need to do first is plan this out, so that when you are setting it up it will be extremely easy and you are not trying to make decisions on the fly. I will look up my list of questions and post them back here.

Give me a bit of time, I just got my family together and we are doing the Xmas stuff now. So I may not be able to get back to you until later tonight. -WS
My System SpecsSystem Spec
27 Dec 2010   #8

Windows 7 Enterprise (x64); Windows Server 2008 R2 (x64)
 
 

Active Directory Domain Prep

1) DHCP and DNS: You need to have a reliable DHCP and DNS server or you can add these to your Domain Controller (DC). If you use them on the DC you will find some extra benefits, like auto updating of DNS and DHCP and vice versa. Plus your DNS can be Active Directory (AD) integrated and secure. I highly recommend you use Microsoft’s DHCP and DNS services. If you have 3rd party services or servers you will need to do a bit of research to find the best way to integrate them with your Domain.
2) The workstations: You need an inventory of the machines. If you have any machine that have (Windows 98/se, Windows 95, Windows ME, Windows 2000, Windows NT (any version) you are going to have to make some decisions because these machines will not support some versions of AD. If you have Windows XP Professional or newer machines you should not have many issues. Next (Windows XP Home, Windows Vista Starter, Windows Vista Home/Premium, Windows 7 Starter, Windows 7 Home/Premium) cannot be added to a domain by design. There are hacks and work arounds but I would not recommend them, you will only be asking for trouble and issues later. (Believe me I have been down this road before)
3) Server Version: If you have all Windows XP Professional or better workstations you can use Windows Server 2008 R2 and AD. This will give you the latest version of AD and the most options. If don’t have newer Workstations then you may want to consider Windows Server 2003 R2 which will give you the backwards compatibly and still support Windows 7 with updates.

After you have done your basic home work above. Then you need to decide how you want to setup AD. Most of the books and best practices will say something like this. Setup your domain as in: CompanyName.local, then break everything up, Finance (accounting, accounts payable, accounts receivable, budget, etc.), IT (desktop support, network support, programming, systems, help desk, telecommunication, etc.) Management, (CEO, President, Vic President, Board Members, Chairman, etc.). However doing this is a nightmare to setup, edit, configure, and maintain. I only recommend setting up a domain like this if you have over 5000 people and you have 10 Server/Domain Admins to keep up with all the work of moving, deleting, renaming, changing, and adding, staff. As well as all aspects of managing them for security, auditing, termination and disciplinary actions. It is best to keep this simple. Don’t use your company name in the domain name, this way if the company gets bought out, sold or goes through a name change you don’t have to live with an incorrect domain name or all the trouble of renaming it. (Renaming is not as big a deal with Windows Server 2008 R2, now-a-days, however if you need to update web pages, stationary, business cards, etc. etc. it can get quite expensive.) Think of a universal name and go with that. This can be any name because it will only be used internal to your company. Next only setup your departments (PERIOD). Say you have Finance, IT, Management, Legal, HR, Internal Services, and Contractors, then just make those groups in AD. You don’t need it to be overly complex. Now you can group your staff into those groups.

Here is a sample:

Finance (Accounting, Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable, Budget, etc.)
IT (Desktop Support, Network Support, Programming, Systems, Help Desk, Telecommunication, etc.)
Management (CEO, Board Members, Chairman, President, Vic President, etc.)
Legal (Attorneys, Paralegals, Contracts, etc.)
HR (General Staff, Risk, Employee Benefits, Insurance, Health, etc.)
Internal Services (Mail, Duplications, Inter Office, Janitor Services, Maintenance and Repair, etc.)
Contractors (Any and all)

After you have the groups then you can apply restrictions, security, access, shares, printers, etc.

This should give you a good start in figuring out what you need. Once you have that we can move to the next step. -WS
My System SpecsSystem Spec
27 Dec 2010   #9

Windows 7 x64
 
 

Hey thanks "WindowsStar" for your great help. I read it thoroughly and now I should say that fortunately all of our PCs are based on windows 7 x64 Ultimate so I think for Window server edition we have to choose Windows server 2003 R2 or above.

The only question that I have about your post is where you explained the DHCP and DNS Servers, Did you refer to some hardwares or just windows services? do we need to by any extra hardware or just we need a good switch or router like an unmanaged D-link 10/100 fast switch or what?

Thanks again for your time
My System SpecsSystem Spec
27 Dec 2010   #10

 

DNS / DHCP are "Roles" on a server 2008 OS. Once you create your Domain (Dcpromo still used now'a'days?)
You'll be prompted to install roles to the server: File services, print services...DNS/DHCP.

You'll need a static IP scope in order to implement these services.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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