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Windows 7: Should I purchase a Router/Switch/Modem/Router

13 Oct 2012   #1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 Service Pack 1
 
 
Should I purchase a Router/Switch/Modem/Router

Hi everyone,

Before I begin stating my question let it be said that I am a dimwit in networking. I just learned from other people how to normally make it work and now the time's come that I actually have to do something and I can't really figure it out.

1. My home DSL is powered by an Aztech ADSL - DSL5001EN. Currently, the modem is set to PPPoE/PPPoA with a username and a password.

2. I have 2 PCs running on Wired LAN cards.

3. I do not want to purchase wireless adapters for either as I want to go wired on this.

4. I'd like to keep the Aztech as the DHCP server/router since it has a pretty good wireless range and all the features I need can be found on the GUI.

What exactly is the device I need and generally, what do I need to do to make it work the way I have it pictured?

Disclaimer: I may have mixed the terms a bit. I also know that I may not be making any sense due to the lack of knowledge I have in the subject. I wil not be held responsible for your brain and nose bleeds.

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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13 Oct 2012   #2

Win 7 Pro 64-bit 7601
 
 

The thing you linked is a modem-router, so it connects to the internet AND routes traffic between all the computers connected to it. Good.
Looking at the ports behind, it has only ONE Ethernet port. Bad, and where your issue is.

If you want to go 100% wired, you need an ethernet switch. It's a device that is smart enough to route the ethernet traffic from more than one PC through a single cable, but dumb enough that is plug and play.
Something like this is cheap and tiny (i've seen tons of exactly the ones I linked and their bigger 24-port collegues in all companies with decent internal networks). Plug the ethernet cables from your router and from the computers into any of its 5 ports, as it doesn't matter, and you are ready to go.

If you want to do something fancy like connecting ethernet (network cable) devices to your wireless modem router through wireless connection without buying wireless adapters, look for a Wireless Ethernet Bridge. These do need some setup to be integrated in your wireless network (as someone has to tell them the name of the wireless network they need to connect and the password), but it's usually straightforward as they are much simpler devices than the modem-router you have already.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Oct 2012   #3

Windows 8.1 Pro RTM x64
 
 

You need to use a switch. All routers that are able to provide WiFi and Ethernet connections already have one built-in, but not all have multiple Ethernet ports available (as in your case).

Take a look at the following suggestions (I have chosen Gigabit switches to ensure no loss of bandwidth).

GS605
D-Link UK | DGS-1005D 5-Port 10/100/1000 Gigabit Desktop Switch
Buy Cisco Linksys SE2500 5-Port Ethernet Switch - Specials Free Shipping
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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13 Oct 2012   #4

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

The only problem with your current setup is that you have only one LAN port on the modem which leaves you with only one computer at a time plugged. What you do need is just a switcher that will suffice for your needs, but a router can work as it plus additional features that you don't plan to use by now.
So the choice is a switcher for cheaper hardware or a router for easier future upgrade if you change your mind thereafter. Both will do what you want. In any case, you'll need 3 RJ-45 cables for pluggin everything (I guess you already have one working on your current computer).

Now for the setup. Simply you plug all 3 devices to the switcher ports (the modem you have, and both computers) and you're done. If you did go with the router, make sure you use 3 LAN ports and leave the WAN port free. With that, you should be able to use your network just like now, but with extra computers. The web interface for the modem will be still on the same IP and both computers should be able to take their addresses from the DHCP there. Port forwarding, if you use it, will work in exactly the same way too, and any wireless device can see both computers too.
One caveat I can think is that, if the new device has the same default IP as the router, you may get a temporary conflict. But just change the IP of the switcher to anything else in the same range and you're done.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Oct 2012   #5
whs

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

I have a similar setup with 3 wired PCs in one location. For that I use a Netgear switch which I bought for $20. That works very well.

In another location I use a Netgear router (which was $40) for a similar setup. The advantage of a router is that you get a hardware firewall which gives you a bit more protection. But the setup of a router is a bit more hassle.

Both ways work. The easiest is the switch.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Oct 2012   #6

Win 7 Pro 64-bit 7601
 
 

point is, he has already a ADSL - DSL5001EN, that has "double-layer NAT/SPI firewall", so assuming he set up his firewall correctly, he just needs a switch.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Oct 2012   #7

7 x64
 
 

Sorry you have what Pictured? I don't see any picture attached to your post.
And you haven't stated what you can't figure out and what you want to do

Your Modem/Router combo box has everything you need. It is a Modem for your DSL connection, Is a Router to separate the Public side from the Private side, has a WiFi access point built in and has a 4 port switch included.

What are you looking to add to this LAN setup?

Do you want to have more then 4 computers WIRED to the Modem/Router combo box? If so then you need an Ethernet switch.
Do you want to extend the WiFi signal? Then you will need a WiFi extender box.

Other then that you'll need to explain what you want to do.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Oct 2012   #8

Win7 Pro 32-bit, Win8 Pro 32-bit
 
 

According to the page the OP linked to, it only has ONE port on the back, not four -- hence his inability to connect more than One PC at a time in wired mode.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Oct 2012   #9

7 x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Mark Phelps View Post
According to the page the OP linked to, it only has ONE port on the back, not four -- hence his inability to connect more than One PC at a time in wired mode.
Ok. Then he need an Ethernet switch.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Oct 2012   #10

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 Service Pack 1
 
 

So here's what I've established so far:

First two replies made it clear to me that I simply need a switch. The router isn't even being considered here since I've already got all the features I need on my modem/router. If I ever do upgrade in the future, it will be a much better modem/router.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Alejandro85 View Post
The only problem with your current setup is that you have only one LAN port on the modem which leaves you with only one computer at a time plugged. What you do need is just a switcher that will suffice for your needs, but a router can work as it plus additional features that you don't plan to use by now.
So the choice is a switcher for cheaper hardware or a router for easier future upgrade if you change your mind thereafter. Both will do what you want. In any case, you'll need 3 RJ-45 cables for pluggin everything (I guess you already have one working on your current computer).

Now for the setup. Simply you plug all 3 devices to the switcher ports (the modem you have, and both computers) and you're done. If you did go with the router, make sure you use 3 LAN ports and leave the WAN port free. With that, you should be able to use your network just like now, but with extra computers. The web interface for the modem will be still on the same IP and both computers should be able to take their addresses from the DHCP there. Port forwarding, if you use it, will work in exactly the same way too, and any wireless device can see both computers too.
One caveat I can think is that, if the new device has the same default IP as the router, you may get a temporary conflict. But just change the IP of the switcher to anything else in the same range and you're done.
This sounds exactly like the sort of thing I want to do. So on the switch itself, all three will be connected to LAN ports. The device will act like an extension of the modem in terms of LAN ports?

Appreciate all the informative replies
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Should I purchase a Router/Switch/Modem/Router





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