Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: I can see all Folders


19 Jan 2013   #11

Windows 7 pro x64
 
 

so what should I do?? Also, how would I go about correcting the issue because its all the drives installed and not just the C drive. Also it shows the ADMIN$ folder. I want to be able to allow users to sign in the network but only want them to see certain drives.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

19 Jan 2013   #12

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

You should work through what chev65 posted here. I can see all Folders

Is your login for both machines the same thing? If so this is why you can access everything. If not you really need to look into your security tab to make sure Everyone is not entered as Chev65 stated.

This is why i like to use the authenticated users special identifier This only allows users who are actually authenticated to the system access (people that can actually log on).
My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Jan 2013   #13

Windows 7 Ult, Windows 8.1 Pro,
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Parman View Post
You should work through what chev65 posted here. I can see all Folders

Is your login for both machines the same thing? If so this is why you can access everything. If not you really need to look into your security tab to make sure Everyone is not entered as Chev65 stated.

This is why i like to use the authenticated users special identifier This only allows users who are actually authenticated to the system access (people that can actually log on).
Yes you are correct about the authenticated users access, it seems to be the only one that can be substituted for Everyone.

I haven't spent enough time to determine exactly what constitutes an authenticated user but I guess it would be anyone in the Workgroup who signs into a Windows machine with Admin credentials.

I imagine with the Authenticated Users setting, a User with Admin credentials signing into a Windows machine that is part of the local Workgroup would have access, but not the standard users with no Admin rights. For Standard or non Authenticated Windows Users to have access it would require you to replace Authenticated Users with Everyone in order to gain access.

Or at least this is what I imagine it means, because I haven't really tested this out yet, what do you think about this one Parman?

Windows 8 also has a new feature where you can share any folder that resides in the C:User folder by using the default Homegroup share settings, as in right click the folder, "Share With" Specific People, choose Everyone to share outside the Homegroup. Picture of the new all User Folders Sharing feature below.

This feature allows a Homegroup member to share any User folder outside the Homegroup with everyone in the local Workgroup, without ever having to mess with the NTFS security permissions. Needless to say this is a much more secure method for sharing individual User folders outside the Homegroup.

Windows 7 only offered this feature for the Library folders.

This confirms that the sharing method we discussed earlier has even more support with Windows 8.

Microsoft is adding feature's that make it much easier to avoid messing with the NTFS security settings which in most cases is best avoided like the plague.


Attached Thumbnails
I can see all Folders-screenshot-1-.jpg  
Attached Images
 
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


20 Jan 2013   #14

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Its my understanding that anyone that can logon is considered an authenticated user.

As far as only administrator account. This doesn't matter I believe its because even an administrative account still uses a standard user token unless they plan to do an administrative task. Then the UAC steps in and replaces the standard user token with the admin token.

I did test this. I was able to connect to a share with a standard user logon, but then I realized by default windows gave users NTFS permissions to the folder by default. So I removed them and tried it again. With the same results.

Now so you think anyone can that know any account information. This is when we dig into the local security policy.
Local Policy< user right assignment < access this computer over the network.

Currently Everyone is added. If this is removed and replaced with user accounts on the PC any account that you do not specify (can also be groups or special ids or other PC/users if on a domain.)

But a better and easier option is to look at
Local Policy< user right assignment < Deny access this computer over the network.

I personally would leave the access the PC left alone and just adjust the deny access. Adding my users a created for this test. "Test" i added the test user to my deny access policy. I could no longer access the share. This is another place that you can add groups and special ID's you can set this to users and then only accounts with administrative rights can access your shares.

As you can see this is a lot of work for someone that is not familiar with or comfortable with setting these permissions.

It has always seemed if your network is straight windows the best and easiest thing to do is create a homegroup.

Chev windows 8 looks like its doing good things with homegroup. I'm ready to get mine so i can test them out.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Jan 2013   #15

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

I see the $ADMIN and $C hidden shares on Ubuntu network browse as well.

This talks about deleting hidden or administrative shares
How to create and delete hidden or administrative shares on client computers

Which I have not tried. How can anyone login to those? My home network shows this and I dont care.

Quote:
Hidden administrative shares that are created by the computer (such as ADMIN$ and C$) can be deleted, but the computer re-creates them after you stop and restart the Server service or restart your computer. Hidden shares that are created by users can be deleted, and they are not re-created after you restart your computer. Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition does not create hidden administrative shares.

To delete a hidden share, follow these steps:
In Control Panel, double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.
Expand Shared Folders, and then click Shares..
In the Shared Folder column, right-click the share that you want to delete, click Stop sharing, and then click OK.
Not clear to me if they will be recreated even after you turn the sharing off.


Attached Thumbnails
I can see all Folders-screenshot-2013-01-22-06-09-13.png  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Jan 2013   #16

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Administrative share - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quote:
How to disable

Microsoft does not detail any method to disable administrative shares. The command:

NET SHARE C$ /delete

can be executed in order to disable the root share in a networked computer. The problem is that after a reboot, the share will be automatically recreated.

A common workaround is to create a batch file with commands to disable all administrative shares (they can be viewed by running the "NET SHARE" command), and then scheduling the script to run at every system startup by using the Windows Task Scheduler.

Usually, the following commands, under a batch file, can successfully disable shares on a Windows XP or Windows Vista system:

NET SHARE C$ /delete
NET SHARE D$ /delete
NET SHARE admin$ /delete
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 I can see all Folders




Thread Tools




Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:02 AM.
Twitter Facebook Google+



Windows 7 Forums

Seven Forums Android App Seven Forums IOS App
  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33