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Windows 7: WiFi interference. Solution?

03 Apr 2014   #11
sml156

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 32-bit 7601
 
 

We might be able to figure this out I just have a few questions

Quote:
So I thought getting power line would solve the issue just run it through the wiring and direct connect to whatever PC needs it beyond that point
What is the name of this device and do you have any other routers or would you be able to buy another wireless router. What I am thinking is you might be able to use the powerline router ( If that's what it is im not sure ) to get closer to the PC and hook the wireless router to that then connect your PC to the wireless router


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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03 Apr 2014   #12
ToxicXGL

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by carwiz View Post
Be sure the router is not sitting on any metal surface such as a file cabinet or metal desk and that there is no metal within a 2-3 of feet of the router. When I said try moving the router, a couple of feet one way or another can make a difference. Even moving the router higher a foot or two can help. I can't imagine any Telco installing a 12" cable or what ever it is. Is the Telco terminus a wall socket or just a wire through an outside wall?

I don't see any pictures so I'm done here.
I'll try moving it a bit. And I'm sure that its a wall socket I think the connect is set up in the basement and routes to that socket
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03 Apr 2014   #13
ToxicXGL

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by sml156 View Post
We might be able to figure this out I just have a few questions

Quote:
So I thought getting power line would solve the issue just run it through the wiring and direct connect to whatever PC needs it beyond that point
What is the name of this device and do you have any other routers or would you be able to buy another wireless router. What I am thinking is you might be able to use the powerline router ( If that's what it is im not sure ) to get closer to the PC and hook the wireless router to that then connect your PC to the wireless router
What i meant by power line was this D-Link PowerLine AV500 Mini Adapter Starter Kit (DHP-309AV) : Range Extenders & Powerline - Future Shop

And yes getting a new router is the idea but only if it will ensure that it reaches rooms that i want it to. The main problem is my current router just drops a bar or 2 at a certain point in the house and i want there to be a strong signal throughout
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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03 Apr 2014   #14
ToxicXGL

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Sorry if I'm making this hard to understand
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Apr 2014   #15
dsperber

Windows 7 Pro x64 (1), Win7 Pro X64 (2)
 
 

WiFi range issues are commonly solved by adding additional "wireless access points (WAP)" at remote locations. Something like a Netgear WN604 (10/100 wired, 802.11a/b/g/n wireless-150) or Netgear WN802 (gigabit wired, wireless-300) are such devices, depending on your wired/wireless requirements at the remote locations.

You plug the WAP into some wired ethernet jack (provided either through an ethernet cable directly to the primary router, or maybe via a nearby PowerLine adapter if you don't have ethernet cable to the remote location). Then the WAP provides a second WiFi network on its own, along with providing additional wired ethernet jacks. It's like a second wired/wireless router but it is not actually a router. It's more like an "invisible extension" of the primary router, with all IP address handling and other network management for devices connected to the WAP (either wired or wireless) being done by the primary router. If you look at "attached devices" in the primary router, you'll see all devices gaining access through the WAP, just as if they'd been connected directly wired/wireless to the primary router.

The range of the WAP is very good, so even if there's no AC wall adapter in a room and no ethernet cable nearby, you can still use a PowerLine adapter in an adjacent room and place a WN604 or WN802 there in that other room, and you'll absolutely still get WiFi reception via the WAP where you want it. it's not quite as strong as the usual primary wireless routers, but it's still very very strong.

Should solve your problem. Note that the wired/wireless speed capability out of the WAP is 100% a function of the wired speed feeding the WAP. If you had the WAP connected via CAT5e or CAT6 cable to a gigabit router, you'd provide maximum wired/wireless speed from the WAP. But if you have CAT5 connection to the router, or you use a PowerLine adapter with low-speed capability, then clearly the WAP will also be similarly restricted on overall speed provided simultaneously to its wired/wireless clients. This is just common sense.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Apr 2014   #16
sml156

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 32-bit 7601
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by dsperber View Post
WiFi range issues are commonly solved by adding additional "wireless access points (WAP)" at remote locations. Something like a Netgear WN604 (10/100 wired, 802.11a/b/g/n wireless-150) or Netgear WN802 (gigabit wired, wireless-300) are such devices, depending on your wired/wireless requirements at the remote locations.

You plug the WAP into some wired ethernet jack (provided either through an ethernet cable directly to the primary router, or maybe via a nearby PowerLine adapter if you don't have ethernet cable to the remote location). Then the WAP provides a second WiFi network on its own, along with providing additional wired ethernet jacks. It's like a second wired/wireless router but it is not actually a router. It's more like an "invisible extension" of the primary router, with all IP address handling and other network management for devices connected to the WAP (either wired or wireless) being done by the primary router. If you look at "attached devices" in the primary router, you'll see all devices gaining access through the WAP, just as if they'd been connected directly wired/wireless to the primary router.

The range of the WAP is very good, so even if there's no AC wall adapter in a room and no ethernet cable nearby, you can still use a PowerLine adapter in an adjacent room and place a WN604 or WN802 there in that other room, and you'll absolutely still get WiFi reception via the WAP where you want it. it's not quite as strong as the usual primary wireless routers, but it's still very very strong.

Should solve your problem. Note that the wired/wireless speed capability out of the WAP is 100% a function of the wired speed feeding the WAP. If you had the WAP connected via CAT5e or CAT6 cable to a gigabit router, you'd provide maximum wired/wireless speed from the WAP. But if you have CAT5 connection to the router, or you use a PowerLine adapter with low-speed capability, then clearly the WAP will also be similarly restricted on overall speed provided simultaneously to its wired/wireless clients. This is just common sense.
dsperber explained it better than I did, you said you had a basement maybee you could hook up the powerline router in the basement and then connect a wireless router to that and with some cat6 get the wireless router right underneith the PC you want to connect to
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Apr 2014   #17
ToxicXGL

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Thanks guys, well I guess I'm looking at a new router or a WAP which one would be the better buy?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Apr 2014   #18
theveterans

Windows 7 Professional x64 SP1
 
 

I would lean towards ASUS RT N66U since it's considered the best N router by many people. For large house, a multi-AP setup is my take (a la office environment). For example, 3 Ubiquiti UniFi AP Long Range (or Pro version for 5 GHz capability) should cover the house with 5 bars everywhere. I like the UniFis for their "smoke alarm and low profile" look which you can mount on the ceiling or on the wall.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Apr 2014   #19
dsperber

Windows 7 Pro x64 (1), Win7 Pro X64 (2)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ToxicXGL View Post
Thanks guys, well I guess I'm looking at a new router or a WAP which one would be the better buy?
You don't want or need an actual second router, although it can be used as a second wireless capability at a distance away from the primary router. You don't want all of the firewall, security, and configuration issues that a true router comes along with.

All you want is a WAP, which conceptually is like a "switch" in that it is connected wired to your primary router, and then provides additional ethernet jacks. Like an ethernet "power strip", but with no firewall overhead or other issue. It simply is kind of an ethernet "port multiplier", in that you have one wired ethernet connection to the primary router and in turn you now have three or four more wired ethernet ports available at the switch.

Furthermore, the WAP provides additional wireless capability to any number of wireless devices in the vicinity. So it's really a "wired/wireless switch" in contrast to an ordinary "unmanaged switch" (like the Netgear GS105) which is wired-only in its port multiplier function. Again, a switch is like a router in that it provides multiple wired ethernet ports (like any electrical power strip does for power). And a WAP goes beyond that, also provides wireless capability as well. But there is no other router-provided security and firewall and port-forwarding etc.. It's just a wired/wireless switch.

So... the WAP is typically less expensive than a router. And easier to configure, and essentially invisible and transparent, simply forwarding on all traffic to the primary router through the ethernet wired connection from WAP to router. Wired/wireless devices connecting through the WAP to the primary router appear to be connected directly to the primary router. The WAP is effectively invisible, serving just as a wired/wireless switch.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Apr 2014   #20
ToxicXGL

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by dsperber View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ToxicXGL View Post
Thanks guys, well I guess I'm looking at a new router or a WAP which one would be the better buy?
You don't want or need an actual second router, although it can be used as a second wireless capability at a distance away from the primary router. You don't want all of the firewall, security, and configuration issues that a true router comes along with.

All you want is a WAP, which conceptually is like a "switch" in that it is connected wired to your primary router, and then provides additional ethernet jacks. Like an ethernet "power strip", but with no firewall overhead or other issue. It simply is kind of an ethernet "port multiplier", in that you have one wired ethernet connection to the primary router and in turn you now have three or four more wired ethernet ports available at the switch.

Furthermore, the WAP provides additional wireless capability to any number of wireless devices in the vicinity. So it's really a "wired/wireless switch" in contrast to an ordinary "unmanaged switch" (like the Netgear GS105) which is wired-only in its port multiplier function. Again, a switch is like a router in that it provides multiple wired ethernet ports (like any electrical power strip does for power). And a WAP goes beyond that, also provides wireless capability as well. But there is no other router-provided security and firewall and port-forwarding etc.. It's just a wired/wireless switch.

So... the WAP is typically less expensive than a router. And easier to configure, and essentially invisible and transparent, simply forwarding on all traffic to the primary router through the ethernet wired connection from WAP to router. Wired/wireless devices connecting through the WAP to the primary router appear to be connected directly to the primary router. The WAP is effectively invisible, serving just as a wired/wireless switch.
Yes either I can get the WAP or a new router entirely but what would be better
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 WiFi interference. Solution?




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