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Windows 7: New PC And "N" LAN Internal Card ?


30 Dec 2009   #1

Windows 7 64bit
 
 
New PC And "N" LAN Internal Card ?

Hello,

Thinking of getting my son a new desktop HP PC for a birthday present.

Presently, on his old PC, he has it connected via an Ethernet cable to a "G" Router.

If I purchase the new PC (thinking a bit of the future) with an internal "N" LAN card,
will the card still work with the present "G" Router via an Ethernet cable ?

If he goes in the future with a wireless connection to the present G router, will it still work ?

Any caveats, etc. with getting the new PC with an N internal card ?

Thanks,
Bob

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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30 Dec 2009   #2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center
 
 

It is going to work, N is "backwards" compatible with G. These sub-standards have nothing to do with Ethernet, they are used to tell the max. distance between a router and a NIC in a WiFi setup.

"A picture tells more than thousand words", they say, so here's some images:
New PC And "N" LAN Internal Card ?-g.jpg
New PC And "N" LAN Internal Card ?-g-mimo.jpg
New PC And "N" LAN Internal Card ?-n.jpg
New PC And "N" LAN Internal Card ?-n1.jpg

Kari


My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Dec 2009   #3

W7 Ultimate 64bit W7 Premium 64bit W7 Premium 32bit WXP Home 32bit
 
 

It's much more than just wireless distance. The various standards deal primarily with speed. As Kari said it has nothing to do with ethernet itself.

802.11n is indeed downward compatible. If an 802.11n adapter associates with an 802.11g access point or wireless router, it will run at 802.11g speeds. One benefit of 802.11n is increased range, but that range will be determined by the antenna arrangement. 802.11n uses Multiple In Multiple Out (MIMO). MIMO performance depends on how many antennas are used. The more antennas, the higher the speed and possibly range. 802.11n benefits of speed are only obtained when all stations are 802.11n and all have the same antenna arrangements. You hear about 300Mbps and higher for 802.11n, but that's implementations where the adapters are all 802.11n, the access points are 802.11n and all the devices have at least a 2x3 or 3x3 MIMO arrangements.

In your case using an 802.11n adapter in the PC and keeping the existing 802.11g wireless router will get you *some* increased range but it won't be any faster. Increased range may not be dramatic though. It depends on the environment.

Now if you swap the 802.11g wireless router for an 802.11n product, you'll see a more noticeable increase in range *and* speed on the local network (not internet).
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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30 Dec 2009   #4

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by RedBirdDad View Post
It's much more than just wireless distance. The various standards deal primarily with speed. As Kari said it has nothing to do with ethernet itself.
Very true. Sorry to "simplify" my answer.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Dec 2009   #5

W7 Ultimate 64bit W7 Premium 64bit W7 Premium 32bit WXP Home 32bit
 
 

No problem!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 New PC And "N" LAN Internal Card ?




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