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Windows 7: Belkin Network


16 Apr 2010   #21

Windows 7 Ultimate 32 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by seekermeister View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by CarlTR6 View Post
Notsograymatter is correct on step 3. Win 7's homegroup is designed for computers all running Win 7. You can make homegroup accept an XP computer; but you have to jump through some hoops. To create a group of computers using different OS's, use workgroup. You will save yourself some frustration. Chev put me on the right path to getting the XP machine working on my homegroup.
Is workgroup different than having "work" as the type of network? I'm not sure about the primary, since it has been a while since I set it up, but I do recall something in the original setup for the adapter (I think), asking for a workgroup, and I left it at the default (mshome). However, when I just reinstalled the software for the adapter a bit earlier, I didn't see anything like this.
Work, Home and Public are types or kind of groups and the selection sets the sharing. Work and home essentially use the same sharing. Public is what you would use in an internet cafe or a public wi-fi hotspot. It tightens sharing down to protect you since you are no longer behind your own router. It keeps someone else from seeing what is on your computer.

Homegroup and workgroup define your actual local group. Homegroup designed is for machines all running Windows 7. Workgroup makes it easier to set up machines of various OS's.

Am I clear as mud?


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

16 Apr 2010   #22

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center
 
 

First, here's a short explanation of your routers main display:

Name:  17042010570.jpg
Views: 167
Size:  19.0 KB
  1. = connected to Internet
  2. = Modem
  3. = Router (wave symbols top right = WiFi enabled)
  4. = At least one wired device connected
  5. = At least one wireless device connected
  6. = WiFi encryption ON
  7. = SSID
  8. = Number of wireless connected devices

As you can see, I have currently three wireless devices connected, two rigs and a printer. One of the rigs is connected with Belkin N+ USB adapter.

Here's how I did it earlier before all my rigs got Seven and I changed from workgroup to homegroup i.e. when I still got a Vista rig and an XP rig in same network with Seven. I'm not saying this is the one and only solution, I'm just telling what worked for me, after trying almost every possible method:
  • Disconnect the computer which is going to use Belkin USB adapter from network
  • Uninstall all wireless devices, shut down the computer
  • Reset modem and router
  • Setup the router (Belkin's web interface, forget the included CD!). Use a hardwired computer to setup (not the one which is using Belkin adapter)
  • Boot the rig which has Belkin USB adapter. For first boot after uninstalling wireless devices, hardwire it
  • Let Windows install wireless drivers
  • Set network type to 'Home' in all rigs (it's your home network, I've understood, so it makes sence to allow as much as possible by default)
That's it, at least my home network worked after this. Of course you have to take care that all rigs are in the same subnet and workgroup.

Good luck!

Kari


My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2010   #23

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by CarlTR6 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by seekermeister View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by CarlTR6 View Post
Notsograymatter is correct on step 3. Win 7's homegroup is designed for computers all running Win 7. You can make homegroup accept an XP computer; but you have to jump through some hoops. To create a group of computers using different OS's, use workgroup. You will save yourself some frustration. Chev put me on the right path to getting the XP machine working on my homegroup.
Is workgroup different than having "work" as the type of network? I'm not sure about the primary, since it has been a while since I set it up, but I do recall something in the original setup for the adapter (I think), asking for a workgroup, and I left it at the default (mshome). However, when I just reinstalled the software for the adapter a bit earlier, I didn't see anything like this.
Work, Home and Public are types or kind of groups and the selection sets the sharing. Work and home essentially use the same sharing. Public is what you would use in an internet cafe or a public wi-fi hotspot. It tightens sharing down to protect you since you are no longer behind your own router. It keeps someone else from seeing what is on your computer.

Homegroup and workgroup define your actual local group. Homegroup designed is for machines all running Windows 7. Workgroup makes it easier to set up machines of various OS's.

Am I clear as mud?
You may be crystal clear, and it is my understanding that is muddy. When I go to Network And Sharing Center, and go to the link where you set the type of network, does that determine the workgroup also? In other words, I'm confused as to definitions of network vs workgroup. As I said, my network is set at work on the primary, and unknown on the secondary, because I have not found a means of configuring it in the wireless utility.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


16 Apr 2010   #24

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Here is another option that I don't understand:

Quote:
If an external Registrar is available, you can also enter Router's PIN at the external Registrar. To change Router's PIN, click "Generate New PIN". Or click "Restore Default PIN" to reset the PIN to factory default.
What to heck is an external registrar?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2010   #25

 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by seekermeister View Post
You may be crystal clear, and it is my understanding that is muddy. When I go to Network And Sharing Center, and go to the link where you set the type of network, does that determine the workgroup also? In other words, I'm confused as to definitions of network vs workgroup. As I said, my network is set at work on the primary, and unknown on the secondary, because I have not found a means of configuring it in the wireless utility.
This MS link describes this as "Network Location". These are "pre-set" security settings depending on where you are using the network access:

Choosing a network location

Hope this helps some.

Cheers!
Robert
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2010   #26

 
 

The security settings for a simple "unsecured home network" is "Home". To change from "Work" to "Home" click the work link with the mouse and select "Home".

Name:  change_network_location.png
Views: 2
Size:  78.2 KB

I am using "Home" so that is why "Home" is shown in the screen shot.

Cheers!
Robert


My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2010   #27

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center
 
 

Workgroup is a network where joined computers belong to same subnet and IP address space. In one network you can have more workgroups, by default only computers belonging to same workgroup can share (drives, folders, external devices). Microsoft has made this a little bit more complicated by using the default name Workgroup for workgroup

Homegroup is kind of 'Workgroup v.2'.

Network type can be Home, Work or Public. This determines the default share level. For instance when using a public HotSpot (airports, hotels etc.), because of that Microsoft's default workgroup name it is very likely that a lot of users have workgroup name 'Workgroup'. If these users choose network type 'Home' when using these public access points, they could get in to each other's computers. Choosing 'Public' kind of closes the access to your shares.

Kari
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2010   #28

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Kari View Post
First, here's a short explanation of your routers main display:

Attachment 67730
  1. = connected to Internet
  2. = Modem
  3. = Router (wave symbols top right = WiFi enabled)
  4. = At least one wired device connected
  5. = At least one wireless device connected
  6. = WiFi encryption ON
  7. = SSID
  8. = Number of wireless connected devices

As you can see, I have currently three wireless devices connected, two rigs and a printer. One of the rigs is connected with Belkin N+ USB adapter.

Here's how I did it earlier before all my rigs got Seven and I changed from workgroup to homegroup i.e. when I still got a Vista rig and an XP rig in same network with Seven. I'm not saying this is the one and only solution, I'm just telling what worked for me, after trying almost every possible method:
  • Disconnect the computer which is going to use Belkin USB adapter from network
  • Uninstall all wireless devices, shut down the computer
  • Reset modem and router
  • Setup the router (Belkin's web interface, forget the included CD!). Use a hardwired computer to setup (not the one which is using Belkin adapter)
  • Boot the rig which has Belkin USB adapter. For first boot after uninstalling wireless devices, hardwire it
  • Let Windows install wireless drivers
  • Set network type to 'Home' in all rigs (it's your home network, I've understood, so it makes sence to allow as much as possible by default)
That's it, at least my home network worked after this. Of course you have to take care that all rigs are in the same subnet and workgroup.

Good luck!

Kari
Okay, going down the checklist... items 1-4 are the same as mine. Item 5 remains blank. Item 6 & 7 are the same. Item 8 remains at 0.

I will follow your setup procedure and see what happens.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2010   #29

 
 

Workgroup settings:

Name:  workgroup_01.jpg
Views: 4
Size:  125.1 KB

Name:  workgroup_02.jpg
Views: 2
Size:  97.4 KB

Name:  workgroup_03.jpg
Views: 3
Size:  74.8 KB


My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2010   #30

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by seekermeister View Post
Okay, going down the checklist... items 1-4 are the same as mine. Item 5 remains blank. Item 6 & 7 are the same. Item 8 remains at 0.

I will follow your setup procedure and see what happens.
Important thing to remember is that symbols 4 & 5 don't show how many devices are connected, they are just showing that at least one (wired & wireless) is connected.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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