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Windows 7: Quantum Computing Chip Built

16 Sep 2010   #1

win 7 X64 Ultimate SP1
 
 
Quantum Computing Chip Built

I wonder if they will boot quicker?


FT.com / Global Economy - Computers set for quantum leap

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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16 Sep 2010   #2

Windows 7 x64 / Same
 
 
Quantum Computing Chip Built

Quote:
A new photonic chip that works on light rather than electricity has been built by an international research team, paving the way for the production of ultra-fast quantum computers with capabilities far beyond today’s devices.
Future quantum computers will, for example, be able to pull important information out of the biggest databases almost instantaneously. As the amount of electronic data stored worldwide grows exponentially, the technology will make it easier for people to search with precision for what they want.



An early application will be to investigate and design complex molecules, such as new drugs and other materials, that cannot be simulated with ordinary computers. More general consumer applications should follow.
Jeremy O’Brien, director of the UK’s Centre for Quantum Photonics, who led the project, said many people in the field had believed a functional quantum computer would not be a reality for at least 25 years.
“However, we can say with real confidence that, using our new technique, a quantum computer could, within five years, be performing calculations that are outside the capabilities of conventional computers,” he told the British Science Festival, as he presented the research.
Computing’s great leap forward

Why quantum computing?
To make use of properties that emerge on an ultra-small scale. “Entanglement” – the ability of subatomic particles to influence one another at a distance – and “superposition” – the fact that a particle does not have a definite location and can be in several places at once – are the two most important properties.


Yes, it’s weird but why is it useful?
Because quantum particles can do very many things at the same time, unlike an electronic “bit” in conventional computing. The use of quantum particles, or “qubits”, permits parallel computing on a scale that would not be possible with conventional electronics.


What particles are you talking about?
Many scientists are working with atoms or ions trapped in ultra-cold conditions. But the latest discovery by the Bristol-led team uses photons – light particles.



How does a quantum chip actually work?
There are several models. The Bristol version sends “entangled” photons down networks of circuits in a silicon chip. The particles perform a co-ordinated “quantum walk”, whose outcome represents the results of a calculation.
Of course, special software and input-output devices will have to be developed
to make practical use of the device.

The breakthrough, published today in the journal Science, means data can be processed according to the counterintuitive rules of quantum physics that allow individual subatomic particles to be in several places at the same time.
This property will enable quantum computers to process information in quantities and at speeds far beyond conventional supercomputers. But formidable technical barriers must be *overcome before quantum *computing becomes practical.
The team, from Bristol university in the UK, Tohuku university in Japan, Weizmann Institute in Israel and Twente university in the Netherlands, say they have overcome an important barrier, by making a quantum chip that can work at ordinary temperatures and pressures, rather than the extreme conditions required by other approaches.


The immense promise of quantum computing has led governments and companies worldwide to invest hundreds of millions of dollars in the field.
Big spenders, including the US defence and intelligence agencies concerned with the national security issues, and governments – such as Canada, Australia and Singapore – see quantum electronics as the foundation for IT industries in the mid-21st century.

Another article: 2nd piece...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Sep 2010   #3

Windows 7 Enterprise
 
 

Quote:
FT.com articles are only available to registered users and subscribers.
I guess I'm not one of the elite
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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17 Sep 2010   #4

win 7 X64 Ultimate SP1
 
 
Interloper

I am not a member. I arrived at that article via "Drudge Report". I wasn't aware. My apologies. If you want to read the article. Access is available at this link. Top of the page. "Computers set for Quantum Leap". Could change at any time.


DRUDGE REPORT 2010®
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Sep 2010   #5

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

Thanks for the information Win7User512. The speed of light in a very small chip will be a speeds that a new word will have to be created.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Sep 2010   #6

Windows 8.1 Professional x64
 
 

I'm all for technological advances. Will be interesting to see it in action.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Sep 2010   #7

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 

Thanks for posting this. It's a very complex concept. I'm not sure I'm grasping it at all yet. I don't think it's just about speed in the way we're thinking of it.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Sep 2010   #8

7 Ultimate x64, Vista Ultimate x64, 7 Pro x64, XP Pro x86, Linux Mint Nadia Cinnamon
 
 

Not just speed, but the AMOUNT of information that can be processed at near-light speeds is incredible...this looks like it could really revolutionize computing. Now the question is, how long will it take the technology to become cheap enough for the average consumer...you're looking at 5 years until the processor could actually become used outside of testing and development, and then probably another 15-20 before they can make it cheap enough to mass-produce...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 Sep 2010   #9

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

For right now I could get by with this one.
Los Alamos Computer Fastest Ever - IT Infrastructure from eWeek
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Sep 2010   #10

W7 X-64 W8.1 X-64 Opensuse 13.1 W2003 Server
 
 

Hi there
If a PRACTICAL Quantum computer could ever get built it would pose an ABSOLUTE nightmare for security.

All existing security systems would be obsoleted overnight.

Since the essential property of a Quantum computer is that ALL STATES ARE SIMULTANEOUSLY POSSIBLE it implies that even a brute force password crack of say a 10 TRILLION byte long key would be done in microseconds (remember all possible combinations are done in a SINGLE computation with a Quantum computer.

It might appear that the hardware could be developed LONG before the implications on security were realized -- even the Militiary wouldn't be able to protect their stuff from prying eyes no matter how good their encryption algorithms were.

We'd be going back to a one time pad again -- the only KNOWN provable uncrackable system -- Quantum computing or not.

So a HUGE leap in hardware forcing us to revert back to Dinosaur Technology for our encryption processes.

Banks and customers BEWARE YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.

Cheers
jimbo
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Quantum Computing Chip Built




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