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Windows 7: Hard Disk Drive turns 55


05 Oct 2011   #21

Windows 7 Home Premium (Retail) Full version - With SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by strollin View Post
I worked for IBM San Jose for 19 of those 55 years since the 305 RAMAC was developed. In 1981, in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the 305, they delivered one to my department to be "cleaned up". I'm not sure how long it had been sitting in a warehouse but it was full of spiderwebs and mice nests and such. We cleaned it up (it wasn't operational) to make it presentable to be put on display. While my guys were working on it, I got a good look at it's innards. It was an amazing mechanical marvel. It was pre solid state so there were banks and banks of tubes for it's control circuitry. The head had to fully extract itself from the disk it was currently reading to move to another disk and it moved up and down the vertical stack of disks. The access time must have been agonizingly slow on that thing compared to modern drives (The article says 600ms).

After my tenure with IBM in the disk drive business, it blows me away to see 3T 3.5" drives or large capacity USB thumb drives at the low prices they currently sell for.

In 1986, I bought my first HDD, a 20M Seagate ST-225 for $500, a cost of $25 per MB!
Were you at San Jose during the 2311 and 2314 era? Those were my introduction to DASD's!

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05 Oct 2011   #22

Win 7 Ultimate (64-bit), Win 8.1.1 (64-bit)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by jsquareg View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by strollin View Post
I worked for IBM San Jose for 19 of those 55 years since the 305 RAMAC was developed. In 1981, in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the 305, they delivered one to my department to be "cleaned up". I'm not sure how long it had been sitting in a warehouse but it was full of spiderwebs and mice nests and such. We cleaned it up (it wasn't operational) to make it presentable to be put on display. While my guys were working on it, I got a good look at it's innards. It was an amazing mechanical marvel. It was pre solid state so there were banks and banks of tubes for it's control circuitry. The head had to fully extract itself from the disk it was currently reading to move to another disk and it moved up and down the vertical stack of disks. The access time must have been agonizingly slow on that thing compared to modern drives (The article says 600ms).

After my tenure with IBM in the disk drive business, it blows me away to see 3T 3.5" drives or large capacity USB thumb drives at the low prices they currently sell for.

In 1986, I bought my first HDD, a 20M Seagate ST-225 for $500, a cost of $25 per MB!
Were you at San Jose during the 2311 and 2314 era? Those were my introduction to DASD's!
No, those products pre-date my time at IBM. The first DASD products I worked on were the 3340 & 3350.
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05 Oct 2011   #23

Windows 8 Release Preview x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by strollin View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by msdos622wasfun View Post
I can't even imagine what they would have stored on those things back then. I mean, today, 5 MB doesn't hold much, unless you're talking about the phone numbers and addresses of all your customers and not much else, so if you were a large business, wouldn't that pretty much eat up all that space just for that purpose? A Word document with the word "Hello" takes up 12.3 KB of space. In 5 MB, you could store roughly 400 of those.
Yes, but things are different today with WYSIWYG graphics in Word and such. Back then everything was plain text so 5M could hold lots more data.
True, efficiency and compactness were the number one priority I guess.
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05 Oct 2011   #24

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by msdos622wasfun View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by strollin View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by msdos622wasfun View Post
I can't even imagine what they would have stored on those things back then. I mean, today, 5 MB doesn't hold much, unless you're talking about the phone numbers and addresses of all your customers and not much else, so if you were a large business, wouldn't that pretty much eat up all that space just for that purpose? A Word document with the word "Hello" takes up 12.3 KB of space. In 5 MB, you could store roughly 400 of those.
Yes, but things are different today with WYSIWYG graphics in Word and such. Back then everything was plain text so 5M could hold lots more data.
True, efficiency and compactness were the number one priority I guess.
Larger amounts of data and transaction files were, in the 70's, stored on magnetic tape. I can even remember a product "database" stored on punched cards.
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05 Oct 2011   #25

Windows 7 Pro x64 SP1
 
 

For one thing I get the idea that we have some old people in this topic. I remember when dos came on a 160K single sided floppy and command.com was 1245 bytes..

Rich
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05 Oct 2011   #26

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by richnrockville View Post
For one thing I get the idea that we have some old people in this topic. I remember when dos came on a 160K single sided floppy and command.com was 1245 bytes..

Rich
And BASICA was part of the firmware.
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05 Oct 2011   #27

Win 7 Ultimate (64-bit), Win 8.1.1 (64-bit)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by kado897 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by richnrockville View Post
For one thing I get the idea that we have some old people in this topic. I remember when dos came on a 160K single sided floppy and command.com was 1245 bytes..

Rich
And BASICA was part of the firmware.
Technically, cassette BASIC was in ROM, BASICA (Advanced BASIC), which knew how to read/write disks, came with PC-DOS and relied on portions of code in ROM so it wasn't stand alone and only worked on IBM machines. MS-DOS came with GWBASIC (Gee Whiz BASIC) that could run on non-IBM machines that did not have the ROM BASIC.
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05 Oct 2011   #28

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by strollin View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by kado897 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by richnrockville View Post
For one thing I get the idea that we have some old people in this topic. I remember when dos came on a 160K single sided floppy and command.com was 1245 bytes..

Rich
And BASICA was part of the firmware.
Technically, cassette BASIC was in ROM, BASICA (Advanced BASIC), which knew how to read/write disks, came with PC-DOS and relied on portions of code in ROM so it wasn't stand alone and only worked on IBM machines. MS-DOS came with GWBASIC (Gee Whiz BASIC) that could run on non-IBM machines that did not have the ROM BASIC.
Ah yes. I remember now.
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05 Oct 2011   #29
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

The first one I worked with was an IBM 1311 (2 to 3MB) on an IBM 1440. That was in 1963 in the Time/Life building in NYC. You had to be aware of the rotational delay and program accordingly.

http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP1440.html
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05 Oct 2011   #30

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by whs View Post
The first one I worked with was an IBM 1311 (2 to 3MB) on an IBM 1440. That was in 1963 in the Time/Life building in NYC. You had to be aware of the rotational delay and program accordingly.

http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/mainframe/mainframe_PP1440.html
That's a great site. When i have the time I must have a closer look.
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 Hard Disk Drive turns 55




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