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Windows 7: Don't forget about ACTA


01 Feb 2012   #11
lehnerus2000

Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Linux Mint 17.1 MATE (64 bit)
 
 
EFF ACTA Link

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by seekermeister View Post
I couldn't get a grip on exactly how to view ACTA. This is the first that I've heard of it, and the article was not precise enough for me to feel that I comprehend the weight of the agreement.
Try this link:
https://www.eff.org/issues/acta/

It has articles dating back to 2008.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Feb 2012   #12
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

It is difficult to be sure, but ACTA does seem to potentially impose as much danger to citizens as SOPA did, and is just another approach to the problem, using much of the same means. As far as I'm concerned, what any law, treaty or agreement should target is the persons actually providing illegal data, and then secondly the servers that place it online...not the ISP and particularly not the users at large. The article in the first link said that a person illegally downloading 30 songs, could be fined as much as $675,000, which is totally absurd. Perhaps two or three hundred dollars, but no more, otherwise the law is just being used to exploit and profiteer on internet users.

EDIT: I can say what effect that is is having on one potential customer (me), in that I'm far less likely to buy any audio or video DVDs of any kind, because I won't spend my money to support legalized thievery.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Feb 2012   #13
Britton30
Microsoft MVP

Windows 7 Ultimate X64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by lorddenis View Post
And some say that ACTA is way worse than SOPA. and sadly my country was one of the countris that signet in secret last week. I mean all this under the pretense to stop piracy.

A little of topic but stil. you never see articles like this anywhere.. thats strange.
Illegal downloaders spend MORE on music than those who obey the law




Illegal downloaders spend MORE on music than those who obey the law | Mail Online
Very true Denis, much overlooked that if a total ban on "infringemnt" took place, demand would drop and proces go through the roof.

Quote:
The agreement will make it easier for law enforcement and ISPs (’intermediaries’) to monitor consumers, and impose new criminal sanctions on those who flout copyright and patent laws.
So, who decides who to monitor? and why?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Feb 2012   #14
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Even if a country has signed the agreeement, what is to prevent it from withdrawing from it afterward?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Feb 2012   #15
lehnerus2000

Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Linux Mint 17.1 MATE (64 bit)
 
 
Prices would go up ...

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Britton30 View Post
Very true Denis, much overlooked that if a total ban on "infringemnt" took place, demand would drop and proces go through the roof.
Prices would go up regardless of demand.

They are a legal monopoly right now.
The only thing that restrains prices is piracy.

How much cheaper would media be, if the companies didn't waste millions of dollars and man-hours on DRM schemes?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by seekermeister
Even if a country has signed the agreeement, what is to prevent it from withdrawing from it afterward?
The US would just strong-arm those countries (e.g. threaten/impose "Trade Sanctions").
Quote:
The U.S. demanded that the Spanish government take action to enact tougher policies on file sharing by passing the Sinde Law, or the U.S. would retaliate with trade restrictions or embargoes.
ZDNet
U.S. ‘threatened to blacklist Spain’ over SOPA-style law | ZDNet
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Feb 2012   #16
arkhi

Windows 2000 5.0 Build 2195
 
 

Imagine this scenario. On a market somewhere, there is this table loaded with cool stuff. These stuff were left there by people who no longer need it and/or decided to share it with a lot of people. They're all free, and some decided to take some of the stuff, some want to by the new ones since the quality of the stuff on the table were too low for the standards. The market owner, Government, noticed this and decided it's causing trouble and called his bodyguard, ACTA, to stop it.

Government's Logic:

ACTA: Okay you can't get these books at the table for free now. But good news! I'm selling them for only a low price of $xxx.xx!!
Everyone: No more freebies? Okay... BUY ALL THE THINGS! AND BUY MORE!

Reality:
ACTA: Okay you can't get these books at the table for free now. But good news! I'm selling them for only a low price of $xx.xx!!
Everyone: Well screw that I'm outa here.
Someone else: *sneaks behind the table*

True story...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Feb 2012   #17
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

lehnerus2000,

Quote:
The US would just strong-arm those countries (e.g. threaten/impose "Trade Sanctions").
Yes that is true, but my question was about the U.S. withdrawing from the agreement. I realize that is quite unlikely, since I imagine that it is the one that is behind it in the first place, but then the question is whether it would continue to do so, if public pressure was sufficient to force them to reconsider their stance. If that did happen, I don't think the other countries could/would strong arm them to remain, and the entire agreement would fall apart.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Feb 2012   #18
lehnerus2000

Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Linux Mint 17.1 MATE (64 bit)
 
 

The US are exempt from any agreements they push/sign.
"Do as we say, not as we do" applies.

The only countries they can't do it to are China, North Korea and Russia.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Feb 2012   #19
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Okay, then I realize it is no consolation to any non-US person, but I have to consider it first from a view as a US citizen. If the US government is not bound by this agreement, then it couldn't be used in any legal proceedings here against a US corportation or citizen. For it to be used elsewhere would require the government of the country involved to enforce it...true? I'm simply attempting to establish the impact this agreement will have on all of us.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Feb 2012   #20
lehnerus2000

Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Linux Mint 17.1 MATE (64 bit)
 
 

I have no idea.
I assume that:
  • Trade treaty violations are handled differently to criminal cases.
  • The US could choose to enforce it on companies if they wanted to.

For example:
Company A upsets the politicians, so it gets persecuted (I mean persecuted).
Company B has "friends in Washington", so it gets off "scot-free".
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Don't forget about ACTA




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