Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: "Windows 8 Survey: Half Who Have Tried the OS Wouldn't Recommend It"

10 Mar 2012   #51

Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Windows XP SP3, Linux Mint 17 MATE (64 bit)
 
 
Software Rewrites?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
Considering that xp still has about 40 percent of OS marketshare, if I were in charge of a fleet of PCs in an enterprise, I would make the shift from xp to 8. Though there will be an initial learning curve, as comes with ANY new Windows OS, I would do it because a) Windows 8 actively manages any CPU's clock speed to reduce power consumption, b) it's compatible with new and old devices, c) it offers better networking abilities than 7 or xp, d) it offers better file navigation, e) it will still look pretty regardless of the age of the PC itself.
You're just assuming that everyone using XP, is an uneducated Luddite.

IT people regularly complain (on forums) that software companies won't update their software to run on Windows 7 (I seriously doubt that they'll update it to run on W8).
I assume that you would personally rewrite all of the "mission critical" software, which only runs on XP & IE6?

This doesn't affect me, as all of my software runs on Windows 7, or in an XP VM (except for one game).


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

10 Mar 2012   #52

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
Considering that xp still has about 40 percent of OS marketshare, if I were in charge of a fleet of PCs in an enterprise, I would make the shift from xp to 8. Though there will be an initial learning curve, as comes with ANY new Windows OS, I would do it because a) Windows 8 actively manages any CPU's clock speed to reduce power consumption, b) it's compatible with new and old devices, c) it offers better networking abilities than 7 or xp, d) it offers better file navigation, e) it will still look pretty regardless of the age of the PC itself.
You're just assuming that everyone using XP, is an uneducated Luddite.

IT people regularly complain (on forums) that software companies won't update their software to run on Windows 7 (I seriously doubt that they'll update it to run on W8).
I assume that you would personally rewrite all of the "mission critical" software, which only runs on XP & IE6?

This doesn't affect me, as all of my software runs on Windows 7, or in an XP VM (except for one game).
No, I'm assuming that many enterprises are still running xp, considering about 40 percent of the OS marketshare is WINDOWS XP.

I highly doubt many of the same programs that ran in Windows 7 won't run in 8. That is a random general assumption. I've done three installs of Windows 8 Developer Preview on three separate systems, installed the same software as I usually do when I do 7 installs, and all but two programs didn't work. I've done two installs of the Consumer Preview on two separate systems. I haven't tested those two programs yet, but they might not still work. If I need those programs for whatever reason, Windows 8 offers Hyper-V built into the client to address that.

Even if some software doesn't work in 8 if it did in xp, Hyper-V is there. Even then, with a new OS upgrade, there is a chance to update or upgrade to different solutions. It sounds ridiculous to hinder an entire upgrade for the sake of one program.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Mar 2012   #53

W7 X-64 W8.1 X-64 Opensuse 13.1 W2003 Server
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
Considering that xp still has about 40 percent of OS marketshare, if I were in charge of a fleet of PCs in an enterprise, I would make the shift from xp to 8. Though there will be an initial learning curve, as comes with ANY new Windows OS, I would do it because a) Windows 8 actively manages any CPU's clock speed to reduce power consumption, b) it's compatible with new and old devices, c) it offers better networking abilities than 7 or xp, d) it offers better file navigation, e) it will still look pretty regardless of the age of the PC itself.
You're just assuming that everyone using XP, is an uneducated Luddite.

IT people regularly complain (on forums) that software companies won't update their software to run on Windows 7 (I seriously doubt that they'll update it to run on W8).
I assume that you would personally rewrite all of the "mission critical" software, which only runs on XP & IE6?

This doesn't affect me, as all of my software runs on Windows 7, or in an XP VM (except for one game).


Hi there

Some people (not you !!) I think just have their brains and vision limited by staring all day long into small Mobile phone screens and assuming if there isn't an app around then you are an old Technophobe who's afraid of upgrading.

Loads of EXPENSIVE equipment lasts years --I'm talking about highly specialized gear that often can cost 1000's or 100,000's of Dollars / Eur etc.

There is a HUGE amount of this type of legacy gear out there designed for W2K and XP that Still works fantastically well (on XP of course).

During the life cycle of the product (some of this equipment is often used for 20 - 30 years -- inconceivable to a lot of people these days brought up in the era of the "chuck it away and buy a new one" society) the manufacturer may well have gone out of business - and even if a new model is available that works on Windows 7 the business can't afford the upgrade - and why should they if the gear still works properly.

Please note here I'm not talking about cheap printers, scanners, etc but highly specialized industrial grade equipment -- for example Blue print drawing equipment, Computerized cutting equipment, glass working gear, Oceanography gear, Oil rig equipment etc etc).

This stuff can run quite happily on an XP VM and a lot still do --- this isn't being a Dinosaur but using properly designed products sensibly and economically -- and especially today until we get the economies working again is probably the best way to ensure a small business's very survival ( and save a considerable amount of cash too).

Some will use XP under a VM, some will continue to use XP natively since the computer may well be dedicated for that particular application so upgrading the OS wouldn't make any sense.


Finally remember most of the guys using this stuff e.g roustabouts on Oil Rigs don't give a hoot about CPU cycles or the other "Geeky" stuff mentioned in the very first post in this thread -- they just turn on the machine and get on with it. This type of gear isn't really dependent on having Ultra fast computers.

Cheers
jimbo
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


11 Mar 2012   #54

Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 64-Bit
 
 

As with any new software there are several questions that need to be asked before you part with your money:
  1. Does it work?
  2. Is it easy to to install and configure?
  3. Is it user-friendly?
  4. Does it offer value for money?
  5. Is it better than what you already have?
If the answers are yes, then go ahead and upgrade, but if the answers are no, save your money until something better comes along.

I've tried Windows 8 and wasn't all that keen on it, so for the time being I'll stick to Windows 7.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Mar 2012   #55

Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Windows XP SP3, Linux Mint 17 MATE (64 bit)
 
 
ROI

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
No, I'm assuming that many enterprises are still running xp, considering about 40 percent of the OS marketshare is WINDOWS XP.
That is exactly the point I was alluding to.
Businesses aren't going to swap to W8, just because you demand that they do.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
I highly doubt many of the same programs that ran in Windows 7 won't run in 8. That is a random general assumption.
I never said that Windows 7 programs wouldn't run in W8.

I specifically mentioned ""mission critical" software, which only runs on XP & IE6".

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
I've done three installs of Windows 8 Developer Preview on three separate systems, installed the same software as I usually do when I do 7 installs, and all but two programs didn't work. I've done two installs of the Consumer Preview on two separate systems. I haven't tested those two programs yet, but they might not still work. If I need those programs for whatever reason, Windows 8 offers Hyper-V built into the client to address that.
Programs I installed in W8 all worked the same as the Windows 7 installs (except for my sound driver).

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Coke Robot View Post
Even if some software doesn't work in 8 if it did in xp, Hyper-V is there. Even then, with a new OS upgrade, there is a chance to update or upgrade to different solutions. It sounds ridiculous to hinder an entire upgrade for the sake of one program.
It's ridiculous to disable equipment that literally makes millions of dollars/day (e.g. Oil rig equipment) just to play around with making it work in W8, using an XP VM.

Why spend millions of dollars upgrading computer equipment, just so that you can run XP in a VM on it, when the existing hardware already runs XP?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by jimbo45 View Post
Some people (not you !!) I think just have their brains and vision limited by staring all day long into small Mobile phone screens and assuming if there isn't an app around then you are an old Technophobe who's afraid of upgrading.

Loads of EXPENSIVE equipment lasts years --I'm talking about highly specialized gear that often can cost 1000's or 100,000's of Dollars / Eur etc.

There is a HUGE amount of this type of legacy gear out there designed for W2K and XP that Still works fantastically well (on XP of course).

During the life cycle of the product (some of this equipment is often used for 20 - 30 years -- inconceivable to a lot of people these days brought up in the era of the "chuck it away and buy a new one" society) the manufacturer may well have gone out of business - and even if a new model is available that works on Windows 7 the business can't afford the upgrade - and why should they if the gear still works properly.

Please note here I'm not talking about cheap printers, scanners, etc but highly specialized industrial grade equipment -- for example Blue print drawing equipment, Computerized cutting equipment, glass working gear, Oceanography gear, Oil rig equipment etc etc).
You are 100% correct.
Businesses don't throw away their working equipment, every six months, like some consumers do.

When I worked as a telecommunications technician, I literally had to work on 80+ year old switching equipment.
It was already installed, working and generating profits, therefore it wasn't replaced.

Equipment was only replaced, when it was deemed uneconomical to repair.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Mar 2012   #56
Microsoft MVP

 

I agree that this new hybridized Start Screen looks like buttons in search of a touchscreen, but they also seem to want to sell apps similar to how Apple does.

Why the apps would be so terrible is beyond me. A few extra features to customize or Close (Hello?) the apps would have made them more palatable since the revolving-wall thing is decent. Isn't that exactly copied from Ipad, though?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Mar 2012   #57

windows 7 Pro 64Bit
 
 

I have came across an acceptable fix (in my opinion) for the lack of a real start menu.
This replacement works very well in win 8 and also captures the windows key input like God intended.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Mar 2012   #58
Microsoft MVP

 

So you reinstall the 7 Start Menu?

The talk at MVP Global Summit in Seattle last week was that MS would have to add back in the Start Menu by the time of RTM.

But using it for awhile it becomes clear that Metro is simply a Start screen which you actually start on, for the purpose of using buttons. Toggling it with windows key is then no different than Start button, just unusual.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Mar 2012   #59

windows 7 Pro 64Bit
 
 

Yes reinstall the start menu, I realize that metro is windows half cocked desperate attempt to finally get into the mobile market. But it is in no way an acceptable start menu. I just won't take bright colorful things zipping around my screen like some sort of digital circus act. Now before we get into this old guy set in his ways scared of change talk again, keep in mind I am 28 years old. I love change when it is for the better, but this is just another marketing gimmick they expect everybody to swallow.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Mar 2012   #60

MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit SP1
 
 

The most important aspects for me would be the boot up and shutdown speed, memory management, system stability, and program loading, etc., performance.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 "Windows 8 Survey: Half Who Have Tried the OS Wouldn't Recommend It"




Thread Tools




Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

© Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:25 AM.
Twitter Facebook Google+



Windows 7 Forums

Seven Forums Android App Seven Forums IOS App
  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33