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Windows 7: Intel 'preparing' to put an end to user-replaceable CPUs

30 Nov 2012   #61

Windows 8 Pro (32-bit)
 
 

I still don't see this as being too much of a problem. the only reason I upgraded m CPU is because I skimped out the first time around. When I upgrade again I intend to get a new motherboard with a 7-series chipset.

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30 Nov 2012   #62

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by King Arthur View Post
What I expect to see is (for example!) 3 motherboards, all identical, except one features the i3, another the i5, and another the i7. Somewhat satisfies CPU/mobo combinations, I guess, but it's still extremely limited in many ways compared to simply having separate CPUs and mobos like we do now.
In another thread, I put the options at 5. There would be two current chipsets, like H61 and P67. Then you'd have three processors, for example, the i3, i5, and i7. For simplification, I'd leave off the high end proc on the budget chipset, so that gives you 5 combinations:

H61-i3
H61-i5
P67-i3
P67-i5
P67-i7

That should be more than enough to fit into any need and budget. Now, the other manufacturers will take these combos and decide on how to offer and how many options, based on form factor of the mobo, SLI or not, RAID or not, 2 or 4 memory slots, networking options, etc.

Again, it's just the cpu and chipset that would be married...nothing more. If it seems like this would be limiting, you aren't considering the big picture.
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30 Nov 2012   #63

Windows 7 Professional x64 sp1
 
 

Whatever they decide to do one thing is sure - there would be enough powerful CPUs for every task. Even with super limited choice.
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30 Nov 2012   #64

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Ultimate 64
 
 

I see this as a huge wild card for AMD and that would be great. Intel will gain in new area's but lose out on others which I hope AMD will want to jump in on again. Otherwise the aftermarket upgrades will be much less diverse and not as much fun to source like we do now! Ever since building my first rig I vowed never again to go back to the store bought rigs !
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30 Nov 2012   #65

Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Windows XP SP3, Linux Mint 16 MATE (64 bit)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by logicearth View Post
Some people are taking this way to seriously. First, Intel is not killing their desktop line. Second Broadwell is way off in the future release after Ivy-Bridge-E, Haswell, both of which will have desktop versions and use sockets. Not to mention we just got Sandy-Bridge-E, we will be well taken care of on the desktop side of things well beyond the release of Broadwell.

All of you are buying into this bulls* and panicing like all the doom sayers want. All you have to do is step back and analyze the situation logically and rationally to realize all of you are over reacting.

Again, we will have three current generation desktop processors well before and after the release of Broadwell. Sandy-Bridge-E, Ivy-Bridge-E, and Haswell.
Isn't this the "Extrapolation Fallacy"?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DeaconFrost View Post
I think a lot of people are missing the point with this. There are way too many processors on the market.
Overall parts should be cheaper, if there weren't so many different choices.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by King Arthur View Post
And what happens when and after Broadwell finally comes around? The articles suggest that Intel won't be going back to modular CPUs for the long-term.
Exactly.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by King Arthur View Post
The difference between the acceptance of non-modular CPUs in the console, mobile, and miniature markets and the refusal in the desktop market is that the former are primarily non-user-servicable while the latter has always been user-servicable. One of the key selling points of a desktop PC has always been that the user can easily add, remove, replace, or upgrade almost any component that the user wishes. It is also one of the key reasons why old desktop hardware can last so long, we can upgrade just the components that need upgrading rather than replacing the desktop wholesale; this also means cost-savings for the user as well. A CPU that is non-modular and mated to a specific motherboard runs counter to this philosophy and removes choice and options from the user and encourages higher prices across the board (pardon the pun).
Agreed.

I have stated something similar to this with regard to software piracy.
If people couldn't pirate software (e.g. Office) the publisher could charge any price they wanted and people would have to pay it (assuming there were no alternatives).

It also applies to backwards compatibility of software.
The computer "world" would look completely different, if all software had to be replaced with each new OS or CPU.

If you can't choose the hardware components you want (or can afford) you have to pay the price that a manufacturer demands for their all-in-one product.

OTOH, maybe it would improve the reliability/stability of the hardware

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by King Arthur View Post
I also welcome having a huge selection of CPUs to choose from. Having a huge selection benefits both the users and the manufacturers because it gives users the opportunity to get the CPU that fits their needs and budget exactly while the manufacturers get to sell CPUs that didn't meet minimum QC for a higher bin as a lower binned CPU. The users get more merchandise to choose from and manufacturers run less unsellable merchandise meaning prices on average should be lower, win win for both.
I think that too many options raises the price, as all of the options have to be produced and stocked.
For example, it's not practical to make 1 million different CPUs.

Of course the problem is, how many options are too many?
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30 Nov 2012   #66

Windows 7 Home Premium x64 SP1
 
 

I learned something from Clubic.com (French technology, internet & professional news) and let me quote the original content (then, I'll translate) :

Quote:
Mise à jour le 30/11/2012 à 12 h 10

Un représentant d'Intel France nous a contacté pour réagir à cet article : « Intel reste résolu à soutenir un marché du PC constitué de multiples segments, dont le traditionnel PC de bureau. Nous continuerons à innover sur chacun de ces marchés. »
Intel Broadwell, la fin du LGA et la fin du PC traditionnel ? (mj)

Translation :

Update (11/30/2012, 12h10pm)
An Intel France spokeperson contacted us to react to this article : "Intel stays resolved to support a PC market consisted of multiple segments, of which the traditional desktop PC. We will continue to innovate on each of those markets."

Take that as you will guys
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01 Dec 2012   #67

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Ult x64 - SP1/ Windows 8 Pro x64
 
 

I would agree with that, Broadwell is probably a Tablet and some Laptop (like Ultabooks) CPU, and maybe starting into the smart phone arena. These are mostly soldered CPU scenarios.
They need a major release to start catching up for those segments of the market, or get left behind (further than they are now).
Doesn't make sense to abandon any part of the market these days. I believe the trend is and will be going to the smart phone/tablet/ultabook crowd, use it and then toss it for a new one.
The PC builders will start seeing lower volumes of selection and unfortunately higher prices.
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01 Dec 2012   #68

Windows 8.1 Pro
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by logicearth View Post
Some people are taking this way to seriously. First, Intel is not killing their desktop line. Second Broadwell is way off in the future release after Ivy-Bridge-E, Haswell, both of which will have desktop versions and use sockets. Not to mention we just got Sandy-Bridge-E, we will be well taken care of on the desktop side of things well beyond the release of Broadwell.

All of you are buying into this bulls* and panicing like all the doom sayers want. All you have to do is step back and analyze the situation logically and rationally to realize all of you are over reacting.

Again, we will have three current generation desktop processors well before and after the release of Broadwell. Sandy-Bridge-E, Ivy-Bridge-E, and Haswell.
It's not about eliminating there desktop line. It is about slimming it down to a small market. It is happening, I didn't need the article to verify this, if people couldn't see this on there own without the article, arghh.
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01 Dec 2012   #69

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Ultimate 64
 
 

It would seem unlikely that Intel would move to stifle the enthusiast/modder market and I can't explain why the couple of articles I've viewed read like Intel is doing just that, but maybe just like our discussion here the articles are a knee jerk reaction from industry insiders.....but why would they be doing this.....just for follies?
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01 Dec 2012   #70

Windows 8 Pro (32-bit)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Dave76 View Post
I would agree with that, Broadwell is probably a Tablet and some Laptop (like Ultabooks) CPU, and maybe starting into the smart phone arena. These are mostly soldered CPU scenarios.
They need a major release to start catching up for those segments of the market, or get left behind (further than they are now).
Doesn't make sense to abandon any part of the market these days. I believe the trend is and will be going to the smart phone/tablet/ultabook crowd, use it and then toss it for a new one.
The PC builders will start seeing lower volumes of selection and unfortunately higher prices.
That does kind of make sense... Broadwell is a die shrink that's focused on efficiency and mobile devices. Haswell will still be around for desktop use.
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 Intel 'preparing' to put an end to user-replaceable CPUs





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