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Windows 7: Why Wait 10 Seconds Before Rebooting Your Router


21 Jul 2013   #11

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit sp1
 
 

I figured as much because it has a few capacitors laid in there plus flash ram / battery to remember the passwords given to it

still good info though for people who need to know why this is

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21 Jul 2013   #12

Win-7 Home Prem 64-bit 7601 Free SP1
 
 

Typical Power drain technic.
Although the normal power drain time is 30 to 45 seconds for best results.
For a router unplug and hold reset button for the same amount of time.
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21 Jul 2013   #13

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium x64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Faladu View Post
I'd like to hear how you clear a CRT, from zapping you dead, reason being, I may have a future need, thanks for the info heads up.
This method will work. Generally the longer the power is removed, the more voltage that will dissipate. But a good CRT will retain voltage a long time. This method will result in a significant zap, but will not harm the CRT.

How to Discharge a CRT Monitor: 11 Steps - wikiHow

A Guy
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21 Jul 2013   #14

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
The same thing applies for most electronics.
The time required to discharge the capacitors varies depending on the device (i.e. how much capacitance the device has).

Various devices can hold dangerous amounts of charge for a very long time (days or more):
  • The old CRTs (the actual tube!)
  • Power Supplies
You need to exercise caution when working on such devices and the best bet is to forcibly discharge them using a load.
Don't just short them out with a screwdriver.

If you don't know what you are doing, you should heed the warning labels.
I used to cannibalize old TV chassis for parts when I was a kid (there was a TV repair shop on my way home from school and they would throw dead TVs out back; I suspect they depended on us kids to get rid of much of their trash for them). Since a chassis and CRT were too heavy to haul home on my bicycle, I would remove the CRT first. After one knocked me on my ample asset while removing the lead from the flyback coil, I learned to discharge them first, using a screwdriver with an insulated handle.
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21 Jul 2013   #15

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
...The other big thing is the "Right Hand Rule".
Always use your right hand, when you are "poking" around electronic devices...
...while keeping your left hand in your pocket. I heard the same rule.
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21 Jul 2013   #16

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Faladu View Post
Figures, I am left handed poker....
Thanks for the follow up.

My follow up is, if just sliding out a CRT, at what point is the ZAP expected to be incoming? or what is touched that delivers it?

I have a bartop touchscreen game, to even get the CRT out for a replacement will be a major under taking and have never done it, plus I have an old Vectrex, still works, but at 31 years old, it can't be that long for this world, although rarely have it on, might have to go in there and rig it up to something else, I will not claim to be an electrician at all.
If the charge doesn't bleed down on its own (the older ones didn't have a resistor in the circuit to bleed down the charge), it's the terminal for the wire that attaches to the side of the CRT. I always slipped a flat screwdriver blade under the boot on the connector to bleed it off (it often made an impressive flash). Keep in mind, I haven't touched the inside of a TV in 40 years.
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21 Jul 2013   #17

Windows 7 64 SP1
 
 

The only thing capable of holding a charge either in modems, routers or TVs (including the older CRT TV and monitors) are capacitors. What makes the older CRT based sets so dangerous was that the CRT needed extremely high voltage to shoot an electron beam to the screen to illuminate the phosphors. Thus was accomplished by using a flyback transformer to raise the voltage level from the capacitors. Since the older CRT sets had large capacitors it could store a lot of charge which through the flyback transformer could give you quite a zap.

Flyback transformer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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21 Jul 2013   #18

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by PaulGo View Post
The only thing capable of holding a charge either in modems, routers or TVs (including the older CRT TV and monitors) are capacitors. What makes the older CRT based sets so dangerous was that the CRT needed extremely high voltage to shoot an electron beam to the screen to illuminate the phosphors. Thus was accomplished by using a flyback transformer to raise the voltage level from the capacitors. Since the older CRT sets had large capacitors it could store a lot of charge which through the flyback transformer could give you quite a zap.

Flyback transformer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Heck, the CRT itself acted like a huge capacitor. And that zap could be dangerous!
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21 Jul 2013   #19

Windows 7 64 SP1
 
 

The CRT cannot store voltage, but their is a connection on the side of the CRT (a thick wire) that comes from the flyback transformer which could give you a severe zap.

Edit: After doing some research I have found CRTs can indeed store some high voltage (because of the construction). Sorry

The Truth About CRTs and Shock Danger
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21 Jul 2013   #20

Windows 7 x64 and numerous virtual machines
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by PaulGo View Post
The only thing capable of holding a charge either in modems, routers or TVs (including the older CRT TV and monitors) are capacitors. What makes the older CRT based sets so dangerous was that the CRT needed extremely high voltage to shoot an electron beam to the screen to illuminate the phosphors. Thus was accomplished by using a flyback transformer to raise the voltage level from the capacitors. Since the older CRT sets had large capacitors it could store a lot of charge which through the flyback transformer could give you quite a zap.

Flyback transformer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Heck, the CRT itself acted like a huge capacitor. And that zap could be dangerous!
Quite right Lady F. The CRT is a capacitor. The plates of the capacitor are the outside layer of graphite type material "dag" which is grounded to the chassis of the unit by bare metal wires under spring tension. The other plate is a metal covering on the inside of the crt which the EHT connects to via the connector from the flyback transformer with the glass as the insulator. The usual voltage is 25KV to 30KV but at a very low current generally not fatal. There is also a focus supply of around 4 to 5 KV and a screen voltage of 200 to 1000volts. The old TV sets from the 1930 used mains developed EHT (Extra High Tension) at 15A and these were widow makers. Microwaves are the same for the very same reason, high current and high voltage. Of course this technology is becoming obsolete. Heck DLP projection TV's, CRT projection TV, and LCD Projection TV's are headed the same way. Plasma TV's seem to be heading that way too due to their complication, high power consumption and weight compared to LED lit LCD's or Cold Cathode Lit LCD's which are much simpler to make and repair effectively making service of the units out of warranty cost prohibitive and causing TV technicians to lose their jobs like the 300+ from Best Buy last July. You are now likely if you have a unit purchased from BBY with a warranty and in home service to get a guy who fixes washing machines mostly as a lot of manufacturers don't even want anything 40" and below repaired it is exchange.
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 Why Wait 10 Seconds Before Rebooting Your Router




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