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Windows 7: Sony and Panasonic team up to create 300GB discs of the future


31 Jul 2013   #1

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium x64 SP1
 
 
Sony and Panasonic team up to create 300GB discs of the future

Quote:
Believing there is a future for optical discs, Sony and Panasonic have said they will jointly develop a new next-generation standard capable of storing a minimum of 300GB on a single piece of media. While both companies have released their own high-capacity optical solutions in the past, they will now work together to develop a new format that will target professionals, but may also come in handy for regular consumers as well.
Source

A Guy


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01 Aug 2013   #2

Windows 7 Professional x64 SP1 / Windows TP 10 x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by A Guy View Post
Quote:
Believing there is a future for optical discs, Sony and Panasonic have said they will jointly develop a new next-generation standard capable of storing a minimum of 300GB on a single piece of media. While both companies have released their own high-capacity optical solutions in the past, they will now work together to develop a new format that will target professionals, but may also come in handy for regular consumers as well.
Source

A Guy
Thanks Bill

Quote:
a minimum of 300GB
Wow looking forward to seeing this
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Aug 2013   #3

W7 X-64 W8.1 X-64 Opensuse 13.1 W2003 Server
 
 

Hi there
I posted another comment on this on W8 saying that RT devices weren't the only stupid product manufacturers sometimes come up with.

Anyway here it is

..While one might have views on the uselessness of the RT tablet and Windows RT in general - here's another example of a product that I suspect is going no-where.

Considering the abject failure of Blu-Ray with its incredibly stupid DRM stuff and totally BOVINE play back restrictions what possible uses are there for 300 GB Optical devices now !!! -- small external Cheap HDD's can easily have capacities of 2 TB and even SSD's are increasing capacity and decreasing costs -- who needs to mess around with Optical media any more and as for buying content - this is increasingly being supplied via STREAMING and fast broadband downloads.

I'd suspect that those areas that don't have fast broadband by the time these discs ever become "mainstream" prices of other media will be EVEN cheaper and only really rural areas will be without decent broadband speeds by this time -- and the market in those areas for this type of device will be TINY if existent at all -- so another BIG FAIL here. If they can't sell BLU RAY what chance of this stuff -- and it will probably be around 2018 / 2020 before 4K TV / Monitors become cheap enough for a typical consumer to use them.

BBC News - Blu-ray successor plan unveiled by Sony and Panasonic

I LIKE technology and "Boys toys" but this seems to me to be utterly ridiculous and will go precisely nowhere.

Cheers
jimbo
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01 Aug 2013   #4

Win 7 Pro 64-bit 7601
 
 

Heh, Jimbo has a point. Even if we disregard the DRM stuff, Blu-ray was very very "meh". Expensive the disk, even more expensive the players needed to read it, myopically focused the market (basically 3D movies. Never seen blu-rays used to do anything else here).

So yeah, if the price does not become 50 bucks per friggin movie plus 100+ for a player and 2000+ for the home cinema that is actually able to play it at full quality regardless of HD, 4K or multi-dimensional holographic movie making technology, then it will likely still have some kind of place as the last gasp of a dying technnology.

I still think that the future will be transition to either fully digital downloads/streaming or modified USB flash drives as they rely on technology that has a ton of other uses as well so can enjoy higher cost reductions due to massive mass-production.
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01 Aug 2013   #5

W7 X-64 W8.1 X-64 Opensuse 13.1 W2003 Server
 
 

Hi there
Not only that -- we could also get the Green party on side -- micro sd cards consume FAR less "Rare Earths", the production processes are cheaper and infinitely less polluting too -- so again apart from the futility of a 300 GB optical drive (I've just bought my 2nd 4TB external drive now for around 170 EUR) environmentally they are a bad idea too.

64 GB micro sd cards are in the offing and who knows how much higher capacity micro devices will come on stream in the next few years -- these types of devices are just fine for things like movies and SSD's will also reduce in size and have larger capacity too.

Cheers
jimbo
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01 Aug 2013   #6

Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Windows XP SP3, Linux Mint 17 MATE (64 bit)
 
 

If they are "burn once" discs (ROM) they have a big advantage over Flash and HDDs, malware can't install itself to the media (after they have been burned).

I could carry backup images of all of my clean VMs, several Linux distros and numerous repair tools on a single disc.

The problems I see are burn time and access time.
It takes ages to transfer 300 GB off of my USB2.0 external HDDs (even USB3.0 isn't particularly speedy).
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Aug 2013   #7

Windows 7 x64 and numerous virtual machines
 
 

There will always be a market for a hard copy. People also need to archive data. On the one hand it does seem rather pointless as I can remember being told when I had a PC with a 1GB drive I would never fill that up But I did and then some. Here in the USA we are reading reports of cable providers sabataging streaming downloads from Netflix, youtube etc. You can buy a fast connection but the cable companies don't really want you to use it Time Warner Cable: No, we don
So unless you like watching your favourite actors "buffering" constantly you will need a DVD of some kind.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Aug 2013   #8

W7 X-64 W8.1 X-64 Opensuse 13.1 W2003 Server
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Indianatone View Post
There will always be a market for a hard copy. People also need to archive data. On the one hand it does seem rather pointless as I can remember being told when I had a PC with a 1GB drive I would never fill that up But I did and then some. Here in the USA we are reading reports of cable providers sabataging streaming downloads from Netflix, youtube etc. You can buy a fast connection but the cable companies don't really want you to use it Time Warner Cable: No, we don
So unless you like watching your favourite actors "buffering" constantly you will need a DVD of some kind.
Hi there
even that's not true --I copy my DVD's to ISO's via software like AnyDVD - I remove the encryption and region code too otherwise the copy is an exact copy of the original DVD and then transfer these to external HDD's.

Sometimes if I'm travelling I just copy a few of these to a micro SD card - a 32 GB card can accommodate about 4 or 5 full commercial DVD's.

Windows 8 makes it even easier it has native built in ISO mounting so you don't even need a virtual DVD mounter either.

Now when you mount one of these "DVD's it behaves exactly like an Optical DVD -- menus and all.

Copying 100's of DVD's on to a small passport 2TB external USB drive IMO gives a much more portable and useful DVD library too. --OK have a 2nd drive for a 2nd copy just in case --HDD storage is cheap enough now.

Cheers
jimbo
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Aug 2013   #9

Win 7 Pro 64-bit 7601
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
If they are "burn once" discs (ROM) they have a big advantage over Flash and HDDs, malware can't install itself to the media (after they have been burned).
Linux does not allow that to happen anyway. Which is why I use linux distros on my USB PC recovery "toolkit" I made with YUMI.

Besides, there are USB drives that can be write-protected with the flip of a switch like the bulk of SD cards, and that technology isn't going to disappear while they are developing this new optical standard.

Quote:
I could carry backup images of all of my clean VMs, several Linux distros and numerous repair tools on a single disc.
That will work only on a select few PCs (the ones with the reader, that will be a minority for a loong while, given how even old stuff is still good enough today). Unless you get an external reader.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Indianatone
Here in the USA we are reading reports of cable providers sabataging streaming downloads from Netflix, youtube etc.
Here in the rest of the world internet speed sucks for a lot of people anyway so that throttling isn't even necessary.

The point was that there are better ways than another new optical drive standard to move data without an internet connection. (namely flash-based storage devices)

I mean, the same situation did not make Blu Ray disks particularly appealing, and adding a new standard will only make it worse.
As it's a new technology all over again, and you cannot simply assume that everyone has a 300GB optical disk reader at home (unless you are Microsoft) the same way you can safely assume that everyone will be able to read a DVD (and around 40-50% are able to read a Blu-Ray).

So that's a few years of R&D, on top of a few years for the new standard to get some recognition and begin to be widespread enough, while hoping that flash-based drive technology sits here doing nothing?

I mean, we have 128 GB SD cards now man. Next year they are likely going to come out with 256 GB ones at affordable prices (there are already 256 GB SD cards but they cost something like 900$).
And the "new" SDXC standard they made in 2009 allows them to go up to 2 TB when they get the chips for that.

EDIT: addendum:
One of the main reasons behind Blu-ray back in the day was that flash drives were too slow for HD movies or 3D or whatever, but that is no more the case since SDHC class 4 (transfer speeds around 4 MB/s, around that of Blu-rays), all new cards are class 10, transfer speeds in excess of 10 MB/s, and depending on manufacturer speeds vary between 20 and 40 MB/s.
Most USB drives have read speeds in excess of 20 MB/s even without going in the high-end models.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Aug 2013   #10

Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), Windows XP SP3, Linux Mint 17 MATE (64 bit)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by bobafetthotmail View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
If they are "burn once" discs (ROM) they have a big advantage over Flash and HDDs, malware can't install itself to the media (after they have been burned).
Linux does not allow that to happen anyway. Which is why I use linux distros on my USB PC recovery "toolkit" I made with YUMI.

Besides, there are USB drives that can be write-protected with the flip of a switch like the bulk of SD cards, and that technology isn't going to disappear while they are developing this new optical standard.
Linux allows things to run with the User's Privilege Level.
I have received patches for RPE and RCE (not as many as for Windows though).

I have never seen a USB stick with that obvious feature (maybe they don't sell them in Australia).
I have seen Internet forum comments stating that say they exist.

I don't use SD cards, but you are right (my friend has a couple lying around).

Why don't external HDDs come with "Write Protection" switches?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by bobafetthotmail View Post
Quote:
I could carry backup images of all of my clean VMs, several Linux distros and numerous repair tools on a single disc.
That will work only on a select few PCs (the ones with the reader, that will be a minority for a loong while, given how even old stuff is still good enough today). Unless you get an external reader.
That is true enough.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by bobafetthotmail View Post
The point was that there are better ways than another new optical drive standard to move data without an internet connection. (namely flash-based storage devices)

I mean, the same situation did not make Blu Ray disks particularly appealing, and adding a new standard will only make it worse.
As it's a new technology all over again, and you cannot simply assume that everyone has a 300GB optical disk reader at home (unless you are Microsoft) the same way you can safely assume that everyone will be able to read a DVD (and around 40-50% are able to read a Blu-Ray).
Obviously the limiting factor will be cost.

Blu-ray discs are expensive.
Cheap Blu-ray discs are 6x the cost of expensive DVD discs (at my supplier).

The drives aren't much better (at least they are backwards compatible).
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 Sony and Panasonic team up to create 300GB discs of the future




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