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Windows 7: DDR4 Next-gen memory. Next-gen performance.


17 Nov 2013   #1
Microsoft MVP

64-bit Windows 8.1 Enterprise
 
 
DDR4 Next-gen memory. Next-gen performance.

Quote:
The next generation of DD4 RAM is coming soon.

Coming late 2013.

Designed to enable the next generation of enterprise and consumer products, Crucial® DDR4 memory technology represents the future of computing. Moving beyond the outgrown limitations of DDR3 module architecture, Crucial DDR4 memory is engineered to pack more performance into your system and has the capability to double the available density per module. Crucial DDR4 modules will use up to 20% less voltage than previous technology, and will enable mainstream data rates that are at least twice as fast as DDR3 memory. With DDR4 memory in your system, get ready to process data twice as fast, load applications faster, experience quick snap responsiveness and increased ability to multitask. If you thought the tablets, ultrabooks, and desktops of today already seem fast — get ready to be blown away. The technology that enables electronics is about to get better and faster than ever before.
Read more at:

Crucial.com - Crucial DDR4 coming soon!

and

DDR4 SDRAM - Micron Technology, Inc.

and

DDR4 SDRAM - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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17 Nov 2013   #2

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit SP 1
 
 

Thanks for the interesting read Brink. DDR4 memory looks like a very nice addition for when I update my current PC in a couple of years. That is, unless it becomes DDR5 by that time.
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17 Nov 2013   #3

w7 ult 32 and w7 hp 64 X 2
 
 

Since DDR5 is already common, why bother with DDR4?
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17 Nov 2013   #4
Microsoft MVP

64-bit Windows 8.1 Enterprise
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by tinmar49 View Post
Since DDR5 is already common, why bother with DDR4?
DDR5 is in graphics cards, but there are no DDR5 RAM sticks yet.
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17 Nov 2013   #5

Windows 7 Professional 64bit SP1
 
 

This is what I'm waiting on.........DDR4 RAM and SATA Express. Can feel a new PC build coming then. Thanks for the info Shawn
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17 Nov 2013   #6

w7 ult 32 and w7 hp 64 X 2
 
 

Graphics cards jumped from DDR3 to DDR5 without bothering with 4. I still use some CAS2 DDR, I wonder how high the latency will be with DDR4?
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17 Nov 2013   #7

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium x64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by tinmar49 View Post
Since DDR5 is already common, why bother with DDR4?
That is GDDR5, graphics card only memory.

Quote:
The principle differences are:
•DDR3 runs at a higher voltage that GDDR5 (typically 1.25-1.65V versus ~1V)
•DDR3 uses a 64-bit memory controller per channel ( so, 128-bit bus for dual channel, 256-bit for quad channel), whereas GDDR5 is paired with controllers of a nominal 32-bit (16 bit each for input and output), but whereas the CPU's memory contoller is 64-bit per channel, a GPU can utilise any number of 32-bit I/O's (at the cost of die size) depending upon application ( 2 for 64-bit bus, 4 for 128-bit, 6 for 192-bit, 8 for 256-bit, 12 for 384-bit etc...). The GDDR5 setup also allows for doubling or asymetric memory configurations. Normally (using this generation of cards as example) GDDR5 memory uses 2Gbit memory chips for each 32-bit I/O (I.e for a 256-bit bus/2GB card: 8 x 32-bit I/O each connected by a circuit to a 2Gbit IC = 8 x 2Gbit = 16Gbit = 2GB), but GDDR5 can also operate in what is known as clamshell mode, where the 32-bit I/O instead of being connected to one IC is split between two (one on each side of the PCB) allowing for a doubling up of memory capacity. Mixing the arrangement of 32-bit memory controllers, memory IC density, and memory circuit splitting allows of asymetric configurations ( 192-bit, 2GB VRAM for example)
•Physically, a GDDR5 controller/IC doubles the I/O of DDR3 - With DDR, I/O handles an input (written to memory), or output (read from memory) but not both on the same cycle. GDDR handles input and output on the same cycle.

The memory is also fundamentally set up specifically for the application it uses:
System memory (DDR3) benefits from low latency (tight timings) at the expense of bandwidth, GDDR5's case is the opposite. Timings for GDDR5 would seems unbelieveably slow in relation to DDR3, but the speed of VRAM is blazing fast in comparison with desktop RAM- this has resulted from the relative workloads that a CPU and GPU undertake. Latency isn't much of an issue with GPU's since their parallel nature allows them to move to other calculation when latency cycles cause a stall in the current workload/thread. The performance of a graphics card for instance is greatly affected (as a percentage) by altering the internal bandwidth, yet altering the external bandwidth (the PCI-Express bus, say lowering from x16 to x8 or x4 lanes) has a minimal effect. This is because there is a great deal of I/O (textures for examples) that get swapped in and out of VRAM continuously- the nature of a GPU is many parallel computations, whereas a CPU computes in a basically linear way.
Source

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by tinmar49 View Post
Graphics cards jumped from DDR3 to DDR5 without bothering with 4. I still use some CAS2 DDR, I wonder how high the latency will be with DDR4?
Actually, some AMD cards did use GDDR4, but it didn't perform as well as the developing GDDR5, and it was costing the same, so it didn't last long.

A Guy
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18 Nov 2013   #8

Windows 7 Home Premium 64Bit
 
 

if im correct in saying, doesnt the ps4 have gddr5 ram? not on the gpu but as main system ram
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18 Nov 2013   #9

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium x64 SP1
 
 

Yes, it does use fast 5500MHz GDDR5 Ram as system ram.

Second PS4 processor and extra GDDR3 RAM revealed

A Guy
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18 Nov 2013   #10

Windows 7 Home Premium 64Bit
 
 

then i see no reason as to why it cant be brought out on pc! consoles are just mini pc's after all!
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 DDR4 Next-gen memory. Next-gen performance.




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