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Windows 7: Microsoft sets stage for massive Windows 10 upgrade strategy

11 Dec 2015   #41
groze

W7 32 bit, Linux Mint Xfce 18 64 bit
 
 

I always wondered IF Microsoft does get data, couldn't someone else get into & deliver viruses back to the computers or even get the data it records? As I said before, I think some of the reports of what data Microsoft gets is a little far fetched but that is just my opinion.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
11 Dec 2015   #42
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by groze View Post
I always wondered IF Microsoft does get data, couldn't someone else get into & deliver viruses back to the computers or even get the data it records? As I said before, I think some of the reports of what data Microsoft gets is a little far fetched but that is just my opinion.
Read the EULA for Win 10. It's worse than a horror story.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Dec 2015   #43
Callender

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Microsoft Updates “Get Windows 10” Prompts, No Longer Offers Reject Option.

Quote:
The “Get Windows 10” app that’s being used by Microsoft to push the new operating system to computers running Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 has received another makeover, this time becoming even more aggressive than before.

Basically, if you’re running an older version of Windows, and you haven’t yet disabled the Get Windows 10 app, the prompt linked to the upgrade is now recommending you to install the new OS and even gives you two different options. But unfortunately, the “no” option is not there anymore.
Full story here:

Microsoft Updates ?Get Windows 10? Prompts, No Longer Offers Reject Option
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

11 Dec 2015   #44
groze

W7 32 bit, Linux Mint Xfce 18 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by groze View Post
I always wondered IF Microsoft does get data, couldn't someone else get into & deliver viruses back to the computers or even get the data it records? As I said before, I think some of the reports of what data Microsoft gets is a little far fetched but that is just my opinion.
Read the EULA for Win 10. It's worse than a horror story.
Yes, I have.

I am not as concerned as I was before but I am still cautious.

Right on my windows 10 partition.
I have a local account.
I have most privacy settings disabled.
I have location on, that because of apps.
I have Cortana turned off. (She never worked for me)
I use Firefox browser.

I do use Microsoft outlook web based email but I also access this using Thunderbird. Microsoft always has access to my emails even with windows 7, just like any other internet service provider does. I stopped using Gmail & closed Gmail because their filters was not doing the job and got some really bad stuff. I still use Google Chrome browser occasionally.

I think the tracking info was releated to Cortana, one drive folder, favorites you save in edge/internet explorer and passwords you save in edge/internet explorer and app purchases.

One thing I don't like is Microsoft shouldn't remove legit software that you have installed. Spybot S&D newer version now keeps a copy of itself, so you can reinstall without having to download it again.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Dec 2015   #45
Borg 386

Win 7 32 Home Premium, Win 7 64 Pro, Win 8.1, Win 10
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Callender View Post
Microsoft Updates “Get Windows 10” Prompts, No Longer Offers Reject Option..
Similar article here...the title says it all.

Quote:
Once a small box begging for a reservation in the corner of the screen, the “Get Windows 10” pop-up prompt has morphed to consume the majority of the display, and worse, it only presents users with two clear actionable buttons: Upgrade now, and Start download, upgrade later. There’s no immediate “No thanks” option whatsoever.
'Get Windows 10' prompt adopts malware-like tactics to lure you into upgrading | PCWorld
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Dec 2015   #46
groze

W7 32 bit, Linux Mint Xfce 18 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Callender View Post
Microsoft Updates “Get Windows 10” Prompts, No Longer Offers Reject Option.

Quote:
The “Get Windows 10” app that’s being used by Microsoft to push the new operating system to computers running Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 has received another makeover, this time becoming even more aggressive than before.

Basically, if you’re running an older version of Windows, and you haven’t yet disabled the Get Windows 10 app, the prompt linked to the upgrade is now recommending you to install the new OS and even gives you two different options. But unfortunately, the “no” option is not there anymore.
Full story here:

Microsoft Updates ?Get Windows 10? Prompts, No Longer Offers Reject Option

What about just hitting the "X" button? This comment is directed toward the article not Callender.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Dec 2015   #47
Borg 386

Win 7 32 Home Premium, Win 7 64 Pro, Win 8.1, Win 10
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by groze View Post
What about just hitting the "X" button? This comment is directed toward the article not Callender.
Apparently it's there, probably small & inconspicuous. Probably like when the decline button is greyed out on unwanted PUP's to make it look like they are inactive.....or you have a little tiny "x" somewhere on a program offering you something extra.

Quote:
To be fair, you can still simply close the window using the X in the upper-right corner, and if you click through the itty-bitty inconspicuous chevron on the right-edge of the window there may be a “Nope” prompt somewhere further down the line. (I closed the prompt before exploring the auxiliary pages.) But having the only two large, clearly actionable options on a pop-up page both lead to a Windows 10 download feels inherently icky—like Microsoft’s trying to trick less-savvy computer users into downloading the operating system with tactics often used by spammers and malicious websites.
Quote:
The most annoying behavior has yet to come for people who have chosen to stay pat with Windows 7 or 8.1, however.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Dec 2015   #48
groze

W7 32 bit, Linux Mint Xfce 18 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Borg 386 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by groze View Post
What about just hitting the "X" button? This comment is directed toward the article not Callender.
Apparently it's there, probably small & inconspicuous. Probably like when the decline button is greyed out on unwanted PUP's to make it look like they are inactive.....or you have a little tiny "x" somewhere on a program offering you something extra.

Quote:
To be fair, you can still simply close the window using the X in the upper-right corner, and if you click through the itty-bitty inconspicuous chevron on the right-edge of the window there may be a “Nope” prompt somewhere further down the line. (I closed the prompt before exploring the auxiliary pages.) But having the only two large, clearly actionable options on a pop-up page both lead to a Windows 10 download feels inherently icky—like Microsoft’s trying to trick less-savvy computer users into downloading the operating system with tactics often used by spammers and malicious websites.

I saw that "X" in the article you posted. The softpedia article didn't say anything about the "X". We posted almost at the same time.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Dec 2015   #49
OvenMaster

Win7 Pro 32bit; Zorin OS 9 Core (in VM)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Layback Bear View Post
Uncle Sam doesn't want encryption for a reason along with other countries.


1. Terrorist would use encryption and it would make it impossible to catch them in a timely fashion.
Finding this information after the shootings and or bombings from the perpetrators computers really doesn't help.

2. Smugglers of guns, drugs, chemicals, people, and many other things would also use encryption to hide their activities.

3. Those with ill-gotten money from illegal activates would also use encryption to hide the movement of their money. One way of catching the bad guys is following the money.

Like most things in life, it's like a playing card; their is two sides.

When companies monitor my internet use then I get unwanted email, phone calls and junk snail mail.
When the government monitor my internet use I get no such things.
They just leave me alone.

For those that don't want anybody or anything to monitor their use of the internet, your plum slick out of luck as long as you use the internet.
At this point and time in the computer world it's not a good or bad thing. It's just a fact that you and I will be watched on the internet.
I'm thinking that 99.9% of us don't really need encryption. I can't think of anything in my personal life I ever needed to encrypt.
I not a criminal and I'm not a terrorist and I still believe in one woman at a time so I have no need to encrypt.
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Layback Bear View Post
Uncle Sam doesn't want encryption for a reason along with other countries.


1. Terrorist would use encryption and it would make it impossible to catch them in a timely fashion.
Finding this information after the shootings and or bombings from the perpetrators computers really doesn't help.

2. Smugglers of guns, drugs, chemicals, people, and many other things would also use encryption to hide their activities.

3. Those with ill-gotten money from illegal activates would also use encryption to hide the movement of their money. One way of catching the bad guys is following the money.

Like most things in life, it's like a playing card; their is two sides.

When companies monitor my internet use then I get unwanted email, phone calls and junk snail mail.
When the government monitor my internet use I get no such things.
They just leave me alone.

For those that don't want anybody or anything to monitor their use of the internet, your plum slick out of luck as long as you use the internet.
At this point and time in the computer world it's not a good or bad thing. It's just a fact that you and I will be watched on the internet.
I'm thinking that 99.9% of us don't really need encryption. I can't think of anything in my personal life I ever needed to encrypt.
I not a criminal and I'm not a terrorist and I still believe in one woman at a time so I have no need to encrypt.
I would not want my personal finances to be viewed by every Tom, Dick, and Hacker. It would be a good way for my money to go bye-bye faster than it already does. Encryption and privacy does have its place, no matter how innocent one may be.
For me, giving up my privacy is simply not a credible option. No one... Micro$oft, my family, hackers, criminals, nor any level of government has any need to know or see what I do with my computer. Giving up privacy = giving up basic freedom of thought. I'm not a criminal nor a terrorist either. But I'll be damned if I don't try my very best to keep as much of my private data private with all means at my command.

I saw a great response on another forum to those who think they have nothing to hide: by all means, these people should feel free to publicly post their login credentials and passwords to their bank, email, medical, ISP login, utility, etc. accounts and see what happens. If they don't then they have something to hide.

Everyone has data that needs to stay private. The government says that we have to take cybersecurity seriously. Well, it starts at home and at the office with individuals taking as many precautions as possible, especially encryption.

Back to our regularly scheduled thread.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Dec 2015   #50
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by OvenMaster View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Layback Bear View Post
Uncle Sam doesn't want encryption for a reason along with other countries.


1. Terrorist would use encryption and it would make it impossible to catch them in a timely fashion.
Finding this information after the shootings and or bombings from the perpetrators computers really doesn't help.

2. Smugglers of guns, drugs, chemicals, people, and many other things would also use encryption to hide their activities.

3. Those with ill-gotten money from illegal activates would also use encryption to hide the movement of their money. One way of catching the bad guys is following the money.

Like most things in life, it's like a playing card; their is two sides.

When companies monitor my internet use then I get unwanted email, phone calls and junk snail mail.
When the government monitor my internet use I get no such things.
They just leave me alone.

For those that don't want anybody or anything to monitor their use of the internet, your plum slick out of luck as long as you use the internet.
At this point and time in the computer world it's not a good or bad thing. It's just a fact that you and I will be watched on the internet.
I'm thinking that 99.9% of us don't really need encryption. I can't think of anything in my personal life I ever needed to encrypt.
I not a criminal and I'm not a terrorist and I still believe in one woman at a time so I have no need to encrypt.
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Layback Bear View Post
Uncle Sam doesn't want encryption for a reason along with other countries.


1. Terrorist would use encryption and it would make it impossible to catch them in a timely fashion.
Finding this information after the shootings and or bombings from the perpetrators computers really doesn't help.

2. Smugglers of guns, drugs, chemicals, people, and many other things would also use encryption to hide their activities.

3. Those with ill-gotten money from illegal activates would also use encryption to hide the movement of their money. One way of catching the bad guys is following the money.

Like most things in life, it's like a playing card; their is two sides.

When companies monitor my internet use then I get unwanted email, phone calls and junk snail mail.
When the government monitor my internet use I get no such things.
They just leave me alone.

For those that don't want anybody or anything to monitor their use of the internet, your plum slick out of luck as long as you use the internet.
At this point and time in the computer world it's not a good or bad thing. It's just a fact that you and I will be watched on the internet.
I'm thinking that 99.9% of us don't really need encryption. I can't think of anything in my personal life I ever needed to encrypt.
I not a criminal and I'm not a terrorist and I still believe in one woman at a time so I have no need to encrypt.
I would not want my personal finances to be viewed by every Tom, Dick, and Hacker. It would be a good way for my money to go bye-bye faster than it already does. Encryption and privacy does have its place, no matter how innocent one may be.
For me, giving up my privacy is simply not a credible option. No one... Micro$oft, my family, hackers, criminals, nor any level of government has any need to know or see what I do with my computer. Giving up privacy = giving up basic freedom of thought. I'm not a criminal nor a terrorist either. But I'll be damned if I don't try my very best to keep as much of my private data private with all means at my command.

I saw a great response on another forum to those who think they have nothing to hide: by all means, these people should feel free to publicly post their login credentials and passwords to their bank, email, medical, ISP login, utility, etc. accounts and see what happens. If they don't then they have something to hide.

Everyone has data that needs to stay private. The government says that we have to take cybersecurity seriously. Well, it starts at home and at the office with individuals taking as many precautions as possible, especially encryption.

Back to our regularly scheduled thread.
Thank you very much!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Microsoft sets stage for massive Windows 10 upgrade strategy




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