Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: Will Windows 8 Be Faster and Smaller Than Windows 7?


21 Apr 2010   #1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 Service Pack 1 (Build 6.1.7601)
 
 
Will Windows 8 Be Faster and Smaller Than Windows 7?

” Are you passionate about software performance? Are you excited by the potential to have a positive impact on hundreds of millions of users, by improving their Windows experience? The Windows Fundamentals Performance Test Team is look for a software design engineer who can help us do just that – make future releases of Windows faster, smaller, and more responsive than Windows 7. OS Fundamentals, and specifically performance were a major area of focus during Windows 7 and will be just as important if not more so, during the development of the next version(s).“

Full read: What is Windows8 | Windows 8 News


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

21 Apr 2010   #2

Win7 32 / 64 and XP 32 / 64 (on various other computers as well)
 
 

Have you seen any concrete methods they will use to make Win8 faster?
What parts will be faster?
Sorry, but I remain skeptical. I highly doubt there will be much reduction of services, code optimization or flattening of menu heirarcy. Let alone rewriting the networking stack. Speed will probably come from hardware requirements like most MS OS since 95.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Apr 2010   #3

Windows 7 x64 Ultimate
 
 

Sure it'll be faster, by then computers will inevitably be faster so...

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


21 Apr 2010   #4

MSDN Home Premium
 
 

The main fight against responsiveness will be partially thwarted by the ever increasing PC threats and the requirement for the AV packages to be constantly on-guard against this ever increasing problem.

I've often considered unplugging the router and disabling my NIS2010 and Spyware Doctor just to see how much faster it would run.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Apr 2010   #5

Windows 7 x64 (RTM via MSDN)
 
 

The MinWin initiative is still in play. While the media assumed this was a new "minikernel" for windows, this was not the case.

The MinWin initiative is a call by call mapping and restructuring of the NT kernel. Windows Vista was the start of this, but the focus was on security. Windows 7 was more focused attention on optimizing calls between USER and Kernel space.

Windows 8 will be a continuation of this.

PhreePhly
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Apr 2010   #6

Win7 32 / 64 and XP 32 / 64 (on various other computers as well)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by KremmenUK View Post
The main fight against responsiveness will be partially thwarted by the ever increasing PC threats and the requirement for the AV packages to be constantly on-guard against this ever increasing problem.

I've often considered unplugging the router and disabling my NIS2010 and Spyware Doctor just to see how much faster it would run.
I have decades with secure OS's. Windows vulnerabilities are just that, Windows vulnerabilities. OS's can be made virtually virus proof and run stable for years. Microsoft has set their balance on the feature side of feature vs security.
Secure OS's run with instant response on 486 class machines. You can run things like Quake or WoW, but the installs are far from automatic. What is killing our response is ease of use and install, which makes easy prey for hacking.

Look up some of the NRC certified OS for running nuclear plants.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Apr 2010   #7

Windows 7 x64 (RTM via MSDN)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Duke of Alinor View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by KremmenUK View Post
The main fight against responsiveness will be partially thwarted by the ever increasing PC threats and the requirement for the AV packages to be constantly on-guard against this ever increasing problem.

I've often considered unplugging the router and disabling my NIS2010 and Spyware Doctor just to see how much faster it would run.
I have decades with secure OS's. Windows vulnerabilities are just that, Windows vulnerabilities. OS's can be made virtually virus proof and run stable for years. Microsoft has set their balance on the feature side of feature vs security.
Secure OS's run with instant response on 486 class machines. You can run things like Quake or WoW, but the installs are far from automatic. What is killing our response is ease of use and install, which makes easy prey for hacking.

Look up some of the NRC certified OS for running nuclear plants.
That is not completely true. If a user, with sufficient credentials, allows a trojan horse to run, even the most secure OS in the world will become infected. Now, by locking down said OS to the point the the User is restricted to performing only a fixed set of instructions, then viritually any OS can be made secure (if it has some form of filed-based access token control).

The problem here is that Windows is on almost 95% of the world's home desktop PCs. The typical user barely understands the basics of computer architecture. How do you expect them to operate such a locked down, fortified OS? MS, more than any other OS vendor has the most difficult job in trying to provide an OS that runs basically on an infinite spread of hardware combinations, has ease of use for the most computer-illiterate population, and is "somewhat" secure.

This is not to say that they haven't made stupid errors. Windows NT should have defaulted to a simple user login and only elevated to Admin ala sudo in *nix. At that point software would have begun the tradition of being written to operate properly in a User only environment. I'm sure others can point out other errors in MS decisions, but don't forget the scale that they operate in and the relative stupidity of the average user.

PhreePhly
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Apr 2010   #8

W7 X-64 W8.1 X-64 Opensuse 13.1 W2003 Server
 
 

Hi all
I really wonder at the "Usefulness"of a "Faster OS" -- at least for around 90% of users out there.

Most users aren't constrained by the speed of the OS but often by totally external factors like the speed of their Internet connection or the "Officey" types of applications they are running - such as word processing or Power point presentations.

There's NO point in having a super slick OS if 99.99999% of the time if it's waiting for keyboard input from the user.

Even the much aligned VISTA could be made to run acceptably if the hardware was OK and you had decent fast DISKS / I/O devices and graphics card.

I think we'll see more "Specialized" OS'es for Gaming and very high speed complex mathematical computation but I doubt whether we will need "faster OS'es" just for the sake of it.

Cheers
jimbo
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Apr 2010   #9

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

If that was the generally accepted perspective, we could probably go back to the Model T. Just because the driver may be old or slow, doesn't mean that he doesn't appreciate a fast, slick sportscar.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Apr 2010   #10

HP Win7 Pro x64 | Custom Win7 Pro x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by KremmenUK View Post
The main fight against responsiveness will be partially thwarted by the ever increasing PC threats and the requirement for the AV packages to be constantly on-guard against this ever increasing problem.

I've often considered unplugging the router and disabling my NIS2010 and Spyware Doctor just to see how much faster it would run.
Many of these software developers are actually taking this into consideration. Example...poor as it may be: The new Norton practically hibernates when a full screen application is launched. This is a start, and I feel certain it will grow and become popular. People will not put up with AV software drowning their systems.

However AV hardly slows down the typical PC, except for very low spec machines that aren't maintained well. People are gradually becoming more and more proficient with software, not really hardware, but certainly software. These plus emerging technologies will by a large margin supersede any issue with AV performance loss. Multi-core, 64bit, and much more, simply put.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Will Windows 8 Be Faster and Smaller Than Windows 7?




Thread Tools




Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

© Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:53 AM.
Twitter Facebook Google+



Windows 7 Forums

Seven Forums Android App Seven Forums IOS App
  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33