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Windows 7: Turbo mode?

02 Jul 2011   #1
mc995599

Windows 7 64-bit
 
 
Turbo mode?

Please excuse any errors in this post as I am a complete overclocking noob, basically my asus motherboard has a "turbo" feature which as far as I am aware sets the maxium speed the cpu should run at. I set mine to 45 getting me a maxium speed of 4.5ghz is this technically an overclock I didnt change voltage etc??


My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jul 2011   #2
Maguscreed

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 x64
 
 

you gotta a 3.3 up to 4.5?
Have you any ideal how hot that thing probably is right now?
Do you at least have a aftermarket heat sink on it?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jul 2011   #3
mc995599

Windows 7 64-bit
 
 

but the thing is its not running 24/7 at 4.5ghz it only goes up when it needs to and yes im using a coolermaster hyper 212
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jul 2011   #4
pantsaregood

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Maguscreed View Post
you gotta a 3.3 up to 4.5?
Have you any ideal how hot that thing probably is right now?
Do you at least have a aftermarket heat sink on it?
Overclocking itself doesn't really increase temperature by any significant amount. Raising voltage is what causes temperatures to shoot up. A 2500K at 4.5GHz isn't really unusual. Mine is running at that speed, and it idles at about 28C.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jul 2011   #5
mc995599

Windows 7 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pantsaregood View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Maguscreed View Post
you gotta a 3.3 up to 4.5?
Have you any ideal how hot that thing probably is right now?
Do you at least have a aftermarket heat sink on it?
Overclocking itself doesn't really increase temperature by any significant amount. Raising voltage is what causes temperatures to shoot up. A 2500K at 4.5GHz isn't really unusual. Mine is running at that speed, and it idles at about 28C.
So is this technically an overclock?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jul 2011   #6
Maguscreed

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 x64
 
 

Thermal radiation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Heat increases as frequency increases it's a basic principle.
It's why electric space heaters work.
Granted voltage has an impact though.

edit: anything that alters the frequencies, speeds, or voltages of core components can be considered overclocking. So yes this qualifies as overclocking, you've increased the frequency of the CPU.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jul 2011   #7
mc995599

Windows 7 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Maguscreed View Post
Thermal radiation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Heat increases as frequency increases it's a basic principle.
It's why electric space heaters work.
Granted voltage has an impact though.

edit: anything that alters the frequencies, speeds, or voltages of core components can be considered overclocking. So yes this qualifies as overclocking, you've increased the frequency of the CPU.
Thanks for the clarification just one last question, if someone tells me they have overclocked to 5ghz stable does this mean they are constantly running at 5ghz or thats its max

Thanks!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jul 2011   #8
Maguscreed

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 x64
 
 

If you force a frequency it will run at that frequency.
A overclock to 5 on air cooling is most likely going to cost you a cpu in the long run though.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jul 2011   #9
pantsaregood

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Frequency does increase heat. The increase from voltage is far greater than that of frequency, though.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jul 2011   #10
Lordbob75

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Mint 9
 
 

Turbo mode is what intel uses to ramp up processing power, or turn it down when it isnt needed. If you have no load on your CPU, the voltage and frequency drop down low to conserve power. When you have load again, it ramps the power up and the CPU runs at full power.

It isn't technically an overclock, it IS overclocking it. You changed the frequency that the CPU runs at when it is at load.

Stability refers to the ability to run at that frequency without crashing the system. You typically test this by running a program like Prime95 for a few hours. If it doesn't crash, you should be stable.

You will also want to check your temperatures to make sure you aren't overheating (over 75 and you should be worried).

As a side note, you really shouldn't overclock until you know what you are doing in the BIOS.

~Lordbob
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