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Windows 7: Multiplier??

22 Jul 2011   #1

Windows 7 64-bit
 
 
Multiplier??

Ok so I think I have overclocked my pc?? Basically my asus p8p67 motherboard has overclocking feature were under load the cpu will run at a set speed for me its 4.5ghz meaning that I max out on that is this overclocking?

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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22 Jul 2011   #2

Windows 7 Enterprise x64 no SP
 
 

I do not recommend oc-ing so heavily for no reason. Here is a little explanation from here.

'What is Overclocking?
Overclocking is the process of making various components of your computer run at faster speeds than they do when you first buy them. For instance, if you buy a Pentium 4 3.2GHz processor, and you want it to run faster, you could overclock the processor to make it run at 3.6GHz.

Disclaimer!
WARNING: Overclocking can F up your stuff. Overclocking wares down the hardware and the life-expectancy of the entire computer will be lowered if you overclock. If you attempt to overclock, I, Rogue_Jedi, and Overclockers.com and its inhabitants are not responsible for anything broken or damaged when using this guide.
This guide is merely for those who accept the possible outcomes of this overclocking guide/FAQ, and overclocking in general.

Why would you want to overclock? Well, the most obvious reason is that you can get more out of a processor than what you payed for. You can buy a relatively cheap processor and overclock it to run at the speed of a much more expensive processor. If you're willing to put in the time and effort, overclocking can save you a bunch of money in the future or, if you need to be at the bleeding edge like me, can give you a faster processor than you could possibly buy from a store

The Dangers of Overclocking
First of all, let me say that if you are careful and know what you are doing, it will be very hard for you to do any permanent damage to your computer by overclocking. Your computer will either crash or just refuse to boot if you are pushing the system too far. It's very hard to fry your system by just pushing it to it's limits.

There are dangers, however. The first and most common danger is heat. When you make a component of your computer do more work than it used to, it's going to generate more heat. If you don't have sufficient cooling, your system can and will overheat. By itself, overheating cannot kill your computer, though. The only way that you will kill your computer by overheating is if you repeatedly try to run the system at temperatures higher than recommended. As I said, you should try to stay under 60 C.

Don't get overly worried about overheating issues, though. You will see signs before your system gets fried. Random crashes are the most common sign. Overheating is also easily prevented with the use of thermal sensors which can tell you how hot your system is running. If you see a temperature that you think is too high, either run the system at a lower speed or get some better cooling. I will go over cooling later in this guide.

The other "danger" of overclocking is that it can reduce the lifespan of your components. When you run more voltage through a component, it's lifespan decreases. A small boost won't have much of an affect, but if you plan on using a large overclock, you will want to be aware of the decrease in lifespan. This is not usually an issue, however, since anybody that is overclocking likely will not be using the same components for more than 4-5 years, and it is unlikely that any of your components will fail before 4-5 years regardless of how much voltage you run through it. Most processors are designed to last for up to 10 years, so losing a few of those years is usually worth the increase in performance in the mind of an overclocker.'
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Jul 2011   #3

Main - Windows 7 Pro SP1 64-Bit; 2nd - Windows Server 2008 R2
 
 

Overclocking is anything that runs your CPU higher than its rated speed. The key word here is "rated". Some recent CPUs from both Intel and AMD have features which automatically boost the CPU speed when needed, sometimes by dropping the speed on another core or two or three.

Your board is using Intel Turbo Boost Technology 2.0, which may be what you're seeing. It comes down to a matter of semantics. If the CPU is "rated" to run at a higher speed under certain conditions a purist might say that it's not really an overclock.

Looks like a nice board and a nice CPU speed, however your getting it.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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22 Jul 2011   #4

Windows 7 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by profdlp View Post
Overclocking is anything that runs your CPU higher than its rated speed. The key word here is "rated". Some recent CPUs from both Intel and AMD have features which automatically boost the CPU speed when needed, sometimes by dropping the speed on another core or two or three.

Your board is using Intel Turbo Boost Technology 2.0, which may be what you're seeing. It comes down to a matter of semantics. If the CPU is "rated" to run at a higher speed under certain conditions a purist might say that it's not really an overclock.

Looks like a nice board and a nice CPU speed, however your getting it.
So your saying I get thats its ok to do this and my pc wont be affected
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Jul 2011   #5

Windows 7 Enterprise x64 no SP
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mc995599 View Post
So your saying I get thats its ok to do this and my pc wont be affected
ur kidding, right?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Jul 2011   #6

Windows 7 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by speedgamer01 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mc995599 View Post
So your saying I get thats its ok to do this and my pc wont be affected
ur kidding, right?
i mean in the long run its not going to destroy my pc etc lol
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Jul 2011   #7

Windows 8.1 Pro
 
 

Overclocking is an enthusiast's hobby that requires a lot of study and trial and error. If you want to do it you need to read, read, and read.... then read some more. It also takes a lot of patience and trial and error.

I would suggest you visit a few overclocking forums and ask lots of questions, in addition to your reading. Here's a good place to start - Overclockers Forums - The Performance Computing Community

There's nothing wrong with overclocking if done properly, and with some understanding of what you're working with. I myself overclock. No, you'll have to read up on your own

One other thing - when inquiring about overclocking, you need to be very precise in listing your system specs. EX: Saying you have a Gigabyte MB, isn't the same as saying you have a Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD5, ver 1.0, BIOS F6.

The reason for this is that equipment and revision changes can affect your overclock ability. Also BIOS versions can throw a wrench in things. For example, BIOS version F6 on a Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD5 ver 1.0 has a completely different layout than F5 did, it even adds some tweaks that weren't available in F5. With that said, it helps to know your BIOS.

Same with RAM, be very specific - list timings, speed, voltage. See my system specs. It also helps to know the Stepping of the CPU. Example a Q6600 DO stepping overclocked a lot better than a B3 stepping.

It might sound complicated but you want to know this things if you're going to overclock.

My two cents. Good luck.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Jul 2011   #8

Windows 7 Enterprise x64 no SP
 
 

Hey, did you read it? lol. it will reduce the life span of the cpu, 2500k is a really overclockable model compared to all others, but I do not see why would you run it faster than stock in present day?
I have the same model and at stock it does everything without touching full load.
If you are rendering videos all the day, if it took eg 1 minute to render it now it takes approx 50 seconds to do.
this difference does not persuade me to overclock at all, but if you see it differently I don't mind, but don't be surprised if your cpu will run years less
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Jul 2011   #9

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

I agree with Sygnus.


Something else about overclocking ...

I can go out and purchase a system thats 100% identical to the one he has for example, and start Overclocking it.

Now, I may not be able to achieve the same Overclocks he does, and fall short. Then again, It could do much better.

The point is, all hardware Overclocks differently, even if its the exact same Hardware.
No 2 Motherboard/CPU combos will do the exact same thing.

This is why just plugging in a set value doesnt always work, or why many "Auto" settings tend to overvolt.

You really need to go into this as a hobby, and do it because its fun to do.
And to get the most out of it, you need to learn what all the settings do and why they should or should not be changed.


And as Sygnus has already pointed out, expect a lot of trial and error. Quite possibly a lot of BSODs.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Jul 2011   #10

Windows 8.1 Pro
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Wishmaster View Post
And as Sygnus has already pointed out, expect a lot of trial and error. Quite possibly a lot of BSODs.
So very very true. I call these T&E BSOD's
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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