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Windows 7: What does it mean to clock the BIOS?

13 Feb 2010   #1
Cuzz

Windows 7
 
 
What does it mean to clock the BIOS?

Im not positive where to put this, but can you get more speed this way?


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

13 Feb 2010   #2
Dwarf

Windows 8.1 Pro RTM x64
 
 

Hi Cuzz,

Many options for overclocking a system can be found in the BIOS, so clocking the BIOS means changing certain BIOS settings so that a system can run faster (or, conversely, slower) than its default settings. Depending on the options available, you may or may not be able to overclock. Check your motherboard manual for details of what BIOS options you have available. If you let us know what motherboard/processor/RAM combination you have, we might be able to guide you.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Feb 2010   #3
pebbly

win 7 ultimate32bit, Win8.1pro wmc 32bit
 
 

also to add to dwarf's statement ,if you do intend to overclock you're system make sure you have adequate cooling ,there is nothing worse than heat for killing a pc
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


14 Feb 2010   #4
Digerati

Windows 7 Profession 64-bit
 
 

Quote:
Im not positive where to put this, but can you get more speed this way?
Yes, on paper. Whether you notice it or not depends on many factors, including how much you overclock it, how much RAM you have, your disk drive, and perhaps most importantly, your graphics solution because today's computing environment is so graphics oriented.

When you overclock the system, you are actually increasing the voltage beyond specifications on critical devices. This causes them to run faster, and generate more heat.

Do note that even if your board supports overclocking, damage from overclocking is not covered under any warranty. So if you overclock your board and your CPU fries, it is out of your pocket.

Generally, because of the risks with overclocking (heat as mentioned by pebbly), I recommend the basics first - make sure you have plenty of RAM and the best graphics card your budget will allow, and a good, brand name PSU to power them. I also don't recommend overclocking "mission critical" computers - that is, computers that are used and required for work or school projects, finances/banking, etc.

And the term is not "clock" the BIOS, but overclock or underclock. You overclock to increase performance (typically for games). Underclocking is often seen as something odd - why would anyone want to slow down their system? But it actually happens a lot for PCs used in home theater (HT) systems. HTPCs really don't have to be super muscle machines so many HT enthusiasts will underclock their systems so they will run cooler allowing them to run without fans, or with fans at very low speeds - thus eliminating or minimizing fan noise while watching movies.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Feb 2010   #5
pebbly

win 7 ultimate32bit, Win8.1pro wmc 32bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
Quote:
Im not positive where to put this, but can you get more speed this way?
Yes, on paper. Whether you notice it or not depends on many factors, including how much you overclock it, how much RAM you have, your disk drive, and perhaps most importantly, your graphics solution because today's computing environment is so graphics oriented.

When you overclock the system, you are actually increasing the voltage beyond specifications on critical devices. This causes them to run faster, and generate more heat.

Do note that even if your board supports overclocking, damage from overclocking is not covered under any warranty. So if you overclock your board and your CPU fries, it is out of your pocket.

Generally, because of the risks with overclocking (heat as mentioned by pebbly), I recommend the basics first - make sure you have plenty of RAM and the best graphics card your budget will allow, and a good, brand name PSU to power them. I also don't recommend overclocking "mission critical" computers - that is, computers that are used and required for work or school projects, finances/banking, etc.

And the term is not "clock" the BIOS, but overclock or underclock. You overclock to increase performance (typically for games). Underclocking is often seen as something odd - why would anyone want to slow down their system? But it actually happens a lot for PCs used in home theater (HT) systems. HTPCs really don't have to be super muscle machines so many HT enthusiasts will underclock their systems so they will run cooler allowing them to run without fans, or with fans at very low speeds - thus eliminating or minimizing fan noise while watching movies.
that's very informative Digerati, too soon for me to rep you on this, but thank you very much
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Feb 2010   #6
CarlTR6

Windows 7 Ultimate 32 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
Quote:
Im not positive where to put this, but can you get more speed this way?
Yes, on paper. Whether you notice it or not depends on many factors, including how much you overclock it, how much RAM you have, your disk drive, and perhaps most importantly, your graphics solution because today's computing environment is so graphics oriented.

When you overclock the system, you are actually increasing the voltage beyond specifications on critical devices. This causes them to run faster, and generate more heat.

Do note that even if your board supports overclocking, damage from overclocking is not covered under any warranty. So if you overclock your board and your CPU fries, it is out of your pocket.

Generally, because of the risks with overclocking (heat as mentioned by pebbly), I recommend the basics first - make sure you have plenty of RAM and the best graphics card your budget will allow, and a good, brand name PSU to power them. I also don't recommend overclocking "mission critical" computers - that is, computers that are used and required for work or school projects, finances/banking, etc.

And the term is not "clock" the BIOS, but overclock or underclock. You overclock to increase performance (typically for games). Underclocking is often seen as something odd - why would anyone want to slow down their system? But it actually happens a lot for PCs used in home theater (HT) systems. HTPCs really don't have to be super muscle machines so many HT enthusiasts will underclock their systems so they will run cooler allowing them to run without fans, or with fans at very low speeds - thus eliminating or minimizing fan noise while watching movies.
Thank you for a very good and concise explanation.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 What does it mean to clock the BIOS?




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