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Windows 7: Enable Ready Boost in win 7?


15 Sep 2010   #1

windows 7 ultimate 32-bit
 
 
Enable Ready Boost in win 7?

recently, i edited something in regedit and stop some services in order to increase my windows boot speed.the problem now is i may b stop some services and cause ready boost not available now.i will attach the error message here... any idea? turning on "sysmain"?




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My System SpecsSystem Spec
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15 Sep 2010   #2

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

The biggest mistake anyone can make with Windows 7 is to start disabling services. That was debateable back in Windows XP (ultimately proven false), but was never the case with Vista or Windows 7. So that leaves me with two points:

1. Go back and reenable everything you disabled. Then, follow the best tweaking advice out there: Leave it alone.
2. If you have less than 1 GB of system memory, you won't gain anything from using ReadyBoost anyway.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Sep 2010   #3

windows 7 ultimate 32-bit
 
 
How about if my system ram is 1.5 gb?

my system ram was 512mb before and i upgraded to 1.5gb.. so...ready boost give any speed changes for my laptop? another question is why stopping the services in windows 7 is a big mistake?
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16 Sep 2010   #4

Windows Server 2008 R2
 
 

For the first, with 512MB ReadyBoost would probably be a big help (because superfetch is pretty much limited, and might as well be off), but with 1.5GB it's debatable - it would depend on how you used your machine and how much disk access you do (remember, ReadyBoost memory isn't used as RAM, it's a disk cache - it helps with superfetch, but it is *not* additional RAM!).

Second, most (not all, but most) non-critical Windows 7 drivers and services are either configured for a manual or delayed start, meaning that for the most part, they will only use resources if you need them. If you are *sure* you won't need a service, you can set it to disabled, but you want to always keep track of the default states in case you have to go back and set them to enabled (or manual, depending on what the service was set to when you disabled it). Windows 7 is a far more efficient user of memory than even Vista was, and is light-years ahead of XP, so reducing potential functionality to save some resources at 512MB makes sense somewhat, but at 1.5GB or higher it really doesn't (and to be fair, I run Windows 7 on a few netbooks with 1GB of RAM, and have zero perf issues).

To configure and start SysMain again, run the following two commands from an elevated cmd prompt:
sc config SysMain start= auto
net start SysMain
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Sep 2010   #5

Windows 7 x64 Home Premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DeaconFrost View Post
The biggest mistake anyone can make with Windows 7 is to start disabling services. That was debateable back in Windows XP (ultimately proven false), but was never the case with Vista or Windows 7.
My Vista computer has 137 services listed and my Win 7 computer has 164 services. As we know the number of services differ from computer to computer but with the number of kernel threads twice the size of XP or Vista the Win 7 OS has a proliferation of services that never existed in XP some of which are so future forward that the architecture is not yet in place to run some services.

An astute user with a complete guide to Win 7 services from Black Viper's Web Site can competently and confidently disable dozens of completely unneeded services in Win 7 and not harm the performance of the computer in any way.

Just because Hong seems to have made a simple mistake in disabling a service that can be remedied with the click of the mouse does not justify calling the disabling of unneeded services a huge mistake. I agree that caution should be taken, but why should anyone leave dozens of useless and unneeded services running some of which collect data for Microsoft even though the user has opted out of CEIP, or to run a fax machine that doesn't exist or a phantom printer?

To name just a few services I do not ever use there is Bitlocker, Bluetooth, Windows Disc Defragger, Encrypted File System, Game Console Service, Human Interface Device Access, Media Center Extender Service or Parental Controls and so I have disabled their respective services. And the list goes on and on of services that I simply don't need and so I have chosen to disable them which is like taking out the computer's trash because while I am running it the computer it will never ever need these services. How can this be considered a huge mistake?

I am not encouraging anyone to disable any of the 150+ services in their Win 7 computer because it will run quite nicely just as it is, but if you are like many of the Members here at the Windows 7 Forums you don't want unneeded services any more than all the GB's of crapware that manufactures put on the computers they sell because although they do not harm the computer both are also totally useless to an individual's operation of the computer and prevent the computer from running lean and clean as some people prefer to.

~Maxx~
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My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Sep 2010   #6

Windows 7 x64 Home Premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by cluberti View Post
For the first, with 512MB ReadyBoost would probably be a big help (because superfetch is pretty much limited, and might as well be off), but with 1.5GB it's debatable - it would depend on how you used your machine and how much disk access you do (remember, ReadyBoost memory isn't used as RAM, it's a disk cache - it helps with superfetch, but it is *not* additional RAM!).
Hong- I agree with cluberti that ReadyBoost could help your RAM challenged computer to run better, but make sure to get as fast a USB Flash Drive as you can 30 MBps read speed would be good to shoot for and there are several out there that can do that.

~Maxx~
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My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Sep 2010   #7

windows 7 ultimate 32-bit
 
 
Hey guys, thanks lot for giving me suggestion!

if i use readyboost, what is the size that i should adjust for my usb pendrive for a better or obvious performance?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Sep 2010   #8

windows 7 ultimate 32-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by cluberti View Post
For the first, with 512MB ReadyBoost would probably be a big help (because superfetch is pretty much limited, and might as well be off), but with 1.5GB it's debatable - it would depend on how you used your machine and how much disk access you do (remember, ReadyBoost memory isn't used as RAM, it's a disk cache - it helps with superfetch, but it is *not* additional RAM!).

Second, most (not all, but most) non-critical Windows 7 drivers and services are either configured for a manual or delayed start, meaning that for the most part, they will only use resources if you need them. If you are *sure* you won't need a service, you can set it to disabled, but you want to always keep track of the default states in case you have to go back and set them to enabled (or manual, depending on what the service was set to when you disabled it). Windows 7 is a far more efficient user of memory than even Vista was, and is light-years ahead of XP, so reducing potential functionality to save some resources at 512MB makes sense somewhat, but at 1.5GB or higher it really doesn't (and to be fair, I run Windows 7 on a few netbooks with 1GB of RAM, and have zero perf issues).

To configure and start SysMain again, run the following two commands from an elevated cmd prompt:
sc config SysMain start= auto
net start SysMain
Hi, i finally found that i disabled the Superfetch before... but i watched a video on Youtube that told me that disabling superfetch can increase windows 7 performance, is it true?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Sep 2010   #9

Windows 7 x64 Home Premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Hong View Post
if i use readyboost, what is the size that i should adjust for my usb pendrive for a better or obvious performance?
4 GB is the largest that ReadyBoost can use although Microsoft is trying to increase that amount so go with 4 GB.



Like I said do try to get a USB Flash Drive that is capable of over 30 MBps sequential read time.

~Maxx~
.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Sep 2010   #10

windows 7 professional & ultimate 64bit laptops
 
 

I don't show ready boost on my Windows 7 laptop


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 Enable Ready Boost in win 7?




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