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Windows 7: Starting computer with power strip

22 May 2013   #1

Windows 7 Prox64
 
 
Starting computer with power strip

So our office just upgraded computers. We went from pentiumD machines running XP, all the way to solid state HD, Core i5's and windows 7. What a change! lol
I am helping to set each station up before we set the pc's at each station. On our old machines we could set them to boot up when we turned on the power strips that they were connected to. We achieved this feature through the BIOS settings. On the new machines I cannot seem to find anything in the new UEFI BIOS settings that would allow me to do this. I see where you can do the LAN boot, time boot, and after power outage boot. I thought the power outage boot would do the trick, but it did not work.
The nightly procedure is that everyone shutsdown there PC's and then turns the power off at the power strip for the night. Then in the morning we turn on the power strip and the PC's start to boot.
If anyone could help me find the feature I am looking for that would be great, or just a simple "That feature no longer exists" would be great too. That way I so not waste any more time looking for something that just isn't there.
Thanks.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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22 May 2013   #2

Windows 8.1 Pro (x64)
 
 

I don't believe this feature exists anymore. Computers (same with monitors) today are very energy efficient when they are turned off making it unnecessary for physically turning off the power on them. You could use time boot however to turn all the machines on at a set time.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 May 2013   #3

Windows 8.1 Pro RTM x64
 
 

Refer to the motherboard manual. Specifically, see Chapter 2, BIOS Information. Section 2.5.7 APM has the information you need. Simply select the option [Power On], which causes the system to turn on automatically after a power failure. Unfortunately, I don't know whether this will work if the system was shut down correctly, or if it only works if there is an unexpected shutdown caused by a loss of power. It's still worth a try, although there's no guarantee that this will work for your scenario.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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22 May 2013   #4

Windows 7 Prox64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Dwarf View Post
Refer to the motherboard manual. Specifically, see Chapter 2, BIOS Information. Section 2.5.7 APM has the information you need. Simply select the option [Power On], which causes the system to turn on automatically after a power failure. Unfortunately, I don't know whether this will work if the system was shut down correctly, or if it only works if there is an unexpected shutdown caused by a loss of power. It's still worth a try, although there's no guarantee that this will work for your scenario.
Yeah, no. As I stated it does not work. That must only work in a power failure scenario.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 May 2013   #5

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

I'm somewhat curious why one would want to do something like this.
I use surge protectors instead on power strips in this fashion.
1. Shut down computer
2. Turn off surge protector.
----------------
To start up the next time.
1. Push button on surge protector to on.
2. Push button on computer to boot.
--------------
Your method only removes one button pushing to boot.
I don't get it.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 May 2013   #6

Windows 7 Prox64
 
 

Yes you are correct. They are surge protectors. I do not really get it either. It is just the way things were done when I got here, and was seeing if there was a way to keep it the same. You know how people are with change, and it is already going to be a big change already going from Office 03 to Office 13! lol
If it can't be done, then its not really an issue.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 May 2013   #7

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Ultimate 64
 
 

dist3allaround,
Welcome to SF. In my opinion you would be best served shutting down through the computer and I would toss all those surge protectors and I would suggest going with properly sized UPS units which provide stable power voltages and back up power in outages to properly shut down in such events.

Smart-UPS - Product Information
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 May 2013   #8

 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by dist3allaround View Post
If anyone could help me find the feature I am looking for that would be great, or just a simple "That feature no longer exists" would be great too.
The feature is completely defined by a motherboard manufacturer. To say more, define that manufacturer and whose BIOS they have used/modified.

Completely irrelevant is the OS and any other hardware. A power controller decides whether to power on the PSU. And later decides when the CPU can execute. BIOS only programs that power controller. I don't know why reboot from power outage would not work. Obviously a motherboard manual would say more.

The original power off procedure is clean and simple. Especially when everything at a work station gets repowered by one simple switch. So why was it done? What must be uniquely accomplished by powering off a power strip? Just a 'fear of change'? Or also something else?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 May 2013   #9

Windows 7 Prox64
 
 

I am not sure why the procedure was in place. The only reason I can think of is some kind of power saving view. The monitors, printer and 10-key are all plugged into the power strip/surge protector. So the unique accomplishment of the single power switch is/was shutdown the entire work station with one switch. Seems kinda silly I would agree! lol
Linneymeyer: The funny thing is that we do have UPS units at each station. lol The UPS is plugged into the wall, then the power strip/surge protector plugs into the USP unit, then everything plugs into the power strip/surge protector. haha
I think this all could be simplified for sure.
The mother boards are ASUS P8 H77-M
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 May 2013   #10

 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by dist3allaround View Post
The funny thing is that we do have UPS units at each station. lol The UPS is plugged into the wall, then the power strip/surge protector plugs into the USP unit, then everything plugs into the power strip/surge protector.
Power strip protector and UPS manufacturers quietly recommend not doing that. They prefer to not discuss why. A power strip protector should not be powered by the UPS. Same electrical problems do not exist when a power strip is the non-protector type.

Shutdown of an entire work station is often done to avert fire. In some locations, rooms are wired with a master power switch at the door. To cut power to all room workstations (while leaving power on to the fax and servers). Last one out turns off the lights and all workstation power.

Under an advanced tab, disable ErP to (maybe) discover additional options.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Starting computer with power strip




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