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Windows 7: My pc seems to be running hot?


25 Oct 2009   #1

Windows 7 Ultimate and Windows Vista Ultimate
 
 
My pc seems to be running hot?

Is my pc running way hotter than it should? What would be the best fix? I mean the thing has 4 fans....

[IMG]file:///C:/Users/Regun/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-screenshot-1.png[/IMG]


Or is 100 C normal >.>



Attached Thumbnails
My pc seems to be running hot?-pc-temp.jpg  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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25 Oct 2009   #2

Win 8 Release candidate 8400
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Regun View Post
Is my pc running way hotter than it should? What would be the best fix? I mean the thing has 4 fans....

[IMG]file:///C:/Users/Regun/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-screenshot-1.png[/IMG]


Or is 100 C normal >.>
Definately NOT GOOD. It might be as simple as blowing out the entire insides with compressed air. It could also mean the thermal paste between the cpu and heat sink needs to be replaced, etc.

First thing a good blowing out with the computer unplugged and a visual expression of the case, cpu, video card. If you are running 64bit there are some hardware/software combos that conflict in the power plan

Let us know if we can help

Ken
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2009   #3

Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit
 
 

ive actually found my laptop to be getting really hot after upgading to 7, its a brand new laptop so dust cant be the problem, but since upgrading its suddenly become very hot..... any ideas on how to fix it?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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25 Oct 2009   #4

Win 7-32, XP Pro-32
 
 

100 C is too hot and above Intel's max rating according to this page.

Did you have another OS on this hardware before Windows 7? What CPU temperature did you see with that OS?

Check that all your fans are in fact spinning, especially the fan on the CPU cooler. Fans can get jammed or unplugged. Make sure that hot air is actually being exhausted from the case. A failed CPU fan on a small heatsink can cause a large temperature rise. If your heatsink is large, and the other fans are working, passive cooling would probably keep the CPU lower than 100 C even with a failed CPU fan.

You could try downloading SpeedFan and see if it reports different temperatures. I'm not familiar with Real Temp and have seen spurious data from temperature reporting programs in the past. Also, reboot and enter Setup. Setup should report temperatures on some setting page.

If you turn the computer off and place your fingers near the CPU, you should feel a lot of heat if 100 C is the actual temperature. But be careful, 100 C is scalding hot and you would burn your finger if you touched something that hot.

If this is a newly installed system and you confirm the temperature report, thermal paste and heatsink mounting is where I would look. Maybe one of the heatsink mounting brackets is loose? Any air gap between the CPU and the heatsink caused by thermal paste separation or improper tightening could easily cause CPU overheating in a very short time.

Guy
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2009   #5

Windows 7 Ultimate and Windows Vista Ultimate
 
 

Hey ken,

After letting my pc sit turned off all day, I turned it back on to find that it said it was running at the same high temps. The computer doesn't seem to be pushing out hot air or anything. It seems as if it should be room temp.

Maybe windows 7 or my I7 motherboard conflicts with the program? What do you think?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2009   #6

Win 7-32, XP Pro-32
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by reedy View Post
ive actually found my laptop to be getting really hot after upgading to 7, its a brand new laptop so dust cant be the problem, but since upgrading its suddenly become very hot..... any ideas on how to fix it?
On my Core 2 Duo desktop system, I was surprised to find that Intel Speedstep was not working with Windows 7 but had worked fine with Windows XP. I had to go into the BIOS and enable both EIST and C1 (I think that was the name for the other parameter), while XP worked fine with just EIST enabled.

Speedstep is a way for the OS to reduce power to the CPU when demand on the CPU is less. My CPU probably runs at 60% power 98% of the time. I would imagine that the heat difference resulting from running at 100% power would be even more noticeable in a laptop.

CPU-Z will report the actual speed of your CPU. Watch it with your system idle and confirm that the processor has slowed down.

If you have an AMD chip, then I think the equivalent feature is called Cool 'n Quiet. I haven't personally used an AMD system with Windows 7 so don't know if any equivalent issue might happen with it.

Guy
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2009   #7

Windows 7 Ultimate and Windows Vista Ultimate
 
 

Here is my speedfan result


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Guy Scharf View Post
100 C is too hot and above Intel's max rating according to this page.

Did you have another OS on this hardware before Windows 7? What CPU temperature did you see with that OS?

Check that all your fans are in fact spinning, especially the fan on the CPU cooler. Fans can get jammed or unplugged. Make sure that hot air is actually being exhausted from the case. A failed CPU fan on a small heatsink can cause a large temperature rise. If your heatsink is large, and the other fans are working, passive cooling would probably keep the CPU lower than 100 C even with a failed CPU fan.

You could try downloading SpeedFan and see if it reports different temperatures. I'm not familiar with Real Temp and have seen spurious data from temperature reporting programs in the past. Also, reboot and enter Setup. Setup should report temperatures on some setting page.

If you turn the computer off and place your fingers near the CPU, you should feel a lot of heat if 100 C is the actual temperature. But be careful, 100 C is scalding hot and you would burn your finger if you touched something that hot.

If this is a newly installed system and you confirm the temperature report, thermal paste and heatsink mounting is where I would look. Maybe one of the heatsink mounting brackets is loose? Any air gap between the CPU and the heatsink caused by thermal paste separation or improper tightening could easily cause CPU overheating in a very short time.

Guy


Attached Images
 
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2009   #8

Win 7-32, XP Pro-32
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Regun View Post
Maybe windows 7 or my I7 motherboard conflicts with the program?
That's always a possibility. See if EVGA has a temperature reporting program for your motherboard.

Also, after seeing a hot temperature from Real Temp or Speedfan, reboot, enter setup, and see what temperature the BIOS reports. It should be about the same because the CPU won't cool off that much just by rebooting.

Is your motherboard a new model? Did you build the computer yourself recently, or did someone else?

Did you check temperatures on this same computer with a previous OS?

On your SpeedFan report, Temp2 looks like a typical hard drive temperature, Temp3 like a case temperature, and GPU looks plausible. The core temperatures seem the same as Real Temp reported.

It is usually possible to tailor Speedfan for your motherboard. Go to the Info tab, press Get Config, and it points you to the web page to start looking for a Speedfan configuration for your specific motherboard. As people develop configurations, they upload them to the Speedfan site. You may have to try several to find a good fit.

I also recommend a Google search for your exact motherboard and temperature reporting to see if there are any known issues.

Guy
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2009   #9

Windows 7 Ultimate and Windows Vista Ultimate
 
 

I checked BIOS and here is what I have for temps

CPU 84C
NB 46C
VREG 50C
System 26C

I shall talk a look at the speedfan configs you were talking about. Do you think updating my BIOS could make things better?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
26 Oct 2009   #10

Win 7-32, XP Pro-32
 
 

The first step I would take would be to confirm that the CPU was actually hot. Check the CPU fan and make sure it is spinning and that the heatsink still seems to be mounted properly. See if the heatsink of the CPU cooler is hot. See if you can tell if the CPU itself is hot, but don't burn yourself. The CPU is hidden by the heatsink, so it may be hard to sense directly.

If the machine is new and under warranty, call your support person. If you built it yourself, check the heat sink mounting.

If you suspect the BIOS is misreporting the temperature, then a BIOS update might make a difference. If that is happening, I would expect that you would be able to find references to the problem using Google.

Since Real Temp, SpeedFan, and BIOS all report similar numbers, a SpeedFan configuration would make the display prettier but probably wouldn't affect the reported temperature.

fwiw, Real Temp reports Core temperature, while SpeedFan reports both CPU and Core temperatures. Core temps are usually 5 or so degrees higher than CPU temps. At 100 C Core temp, a Core i7 is supposed to start shutting/slowing down because of thermal overload. But I've never had that happen personally, so that statement is based on web research not personal experience.

Good luck!
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 My pc seems to be running hot?




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