Windows 7 Forums

Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: <hiberfil.sys> Location » Relocation?

29 May 2015   #11
Layback Bear

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

Please understand that when I'm trying to help some one I don't do jokes.

Their is a difference between (drives) and (partitions).

When you complete the tutorial correctly that I and ThrashZone suggested it could be very helpful. We ask for things to be done for a reason that you will understand later.



Disk Management - Post a Screen Capture Image


It could be handy to know what partition is on what drive and where the active flags are.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
29 May 2015   #12
thricipio

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Hey, everybody–
Thanks for your follow-up comments. Will respond in detail later on… probably, this evening.
—Thri
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 May 2015   #13
thricipio

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ThrashZone View Post
Hi, You state your running out of space on C. You have plenty on D and E
Use Partition wizard free to move and take space from D.

Have you ever ran disk cleanup extended ?
Windows Updates - Remove Outdated Updates in Windows 7
I'll definitely look into Partition Wizard Free. Thanks.

I have performed a recent Disk Cleanup operation. I'm not sure what you mean by "extended," but I did check a box that applied to removing outdated Windows Update files.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

30 May 2015   #14
ThrashZone

Win-7-Pro64bit 7-H-Prem-64bit
 
 

Hi,
Yea the extended part I was going to post to a different tutorial but it said nothing of windows update cleanup so I posted the other one that does

Did you notice how much space they took up ?
Not that it will be very beneficial but should of given some system overwriting space :/

The safest way I see is to copy and paste the files from D to E and verify all pasted well then delete them on D,
Then extend C into D
Plus I wouldn't do this very often leave or give C about 120gb. or all of D and look into a external enclosure for your personal file storage needs
Cheers.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Jun 2015   #15
thricipio

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by LMiller7 View Post
This illustrates one of the biggest problems with multiple partitions. No matter how careful you are in choosing the sizes very often one of them will prove too small while others have space to spare. Even experts have this problem. Organization is best done with folders, not partitions.
Well, this is a good perspective to have . . . at least I know I'm not the only one who's struggled with this; i.e., this isn't the first time I've found myself in the this predicament. Of course, this time around, I thought I'd allocated more than enough space, but that's probably what everybody says… like, every time they find themselves in this circumstance. On the other hand, I'm not sure I'm in such bad shape: my latest Disk Management report shows that I have about 40% free space; albeit, with hibernate capability disabled. And this is after a little over three years with this configuration. I'm thinking I can make it until I upgrade to Windows 10, at which time I'll start over, but with a much larger boot partition — maybe 150GB.


Quote:
I like to have 2 partitions, one for the OS and applications and one for data. This allows reinstallation of the OS without touching your data. But I would find it difficult to justify more than 2 partitions unless dual booting with multiple operating systems.
When it comes right down to it, I might find it difficult as well. However, I must confess to being pretty wedded to the approach I've been using — and I've been using it for quite a number of years now. I like having everything I need to run maintenance on (i.e., the system files, Registry, etc.) in its own partition. And i like having my data in its own partition for backup purposes. And as far as the allocation guessing game is concerned, I'm not sure there's a big difference in the challenge between two and three partitions.

In any case, I appreciate the feedback.

Thanks.

—Thri
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Jun 2015   #16
thricipio

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ThrashZone View Post
Yep
75gb for an os partition is way too small,
I'd say 100gb and a another 50gb as set to unallocated as a empty partition to the right of it then the rest of additional space partitions if that's what your forced to do because you don't have another internal drive to work with or a external hdd to use for other personal goodies.
·
· [snip]
·
These seem like good numbers to me. But, what's the purpose of setting aside 50GB of unallocated space "to the right of it;" i.e., why not just make the boot partition 150GB to start with and skip the unallocated space? I'm asking in order to learn . . . not to be argumentative.

Regarding "another internal drive to work with or a external hdd to use," see my next post to Layback Bear containing a more current and a complete Disk Management report.

Thanks,
—Thri
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Jun 2015   #17
thricipio

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Layback Bear View Post
Please understand that when I'm trying to help some one I don't do jokes.
First off, I do appreciate your (and everybody else's) help. Secondly, my previous response was my way of saying that I use the terms "C-Drive," etc., as vernacular and not intending technical precision, per sé.


Quote:
Their is a difference between (drives) and (partitions).
Since my original post started off with "My {Disk 0} is partitioned into a C-drive (my boot partition)," I thought it was apparent that I was aware that "{Disk 0}" is the volume label for a physical entity (i.e., an actual harddrive) and that a partition is an organizational structure.


Quote:
When you complete the tutorial correctly that I and ThrashZone suggested it could be very helpful.
The tutorial is good work, but somewhat irrelevant to my needs; I'm familiar with Disk Management, screenshots and posting image files (though, admittedly I'd forgotten about the paperclip attachment icon that makes posting a whole lot easier).


Quote:
We ask for things to be done for a reason that you will understand later.
My original screenshot was cropped and therefore incomplete in terms of the amount of information it included. That was a mistake on my part. So, your immediately preceding statement is a point well made… and this time around, it's well taken. So, thanks.

All the best,
--------------
--Thri
--------------

Here's the complete Disk Management report . . .


Attached Thumbnails
-disk-mgmt-lg.jpg  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Jun 2015   #18
ignatzatsonic

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1, 64-bit
 
 

Offhand, I can't think of why you want to leave some space unallocated. Maybe someone else has a reason.

With 2 partitions (C and D), you have only one decision that could go wrong: how much space do I devote to C. By default, all of the remainder would go to D.

With 3 partitions, there are 2 decisions that can be wrong--how much space to C and how much space to D. It's not a critical distinction as long as you are willing and able take the time to resize your partitions at some later date if 1 of the 2 decisions is bad. The best widely available tool is Partition Wizard.

You are the world's foremost authority on how much space you need for C. I've yet to need 40. My data is on an entirely separate drive regardless.

I'd think that having Windows on C and applications on D would complicate a backup strategy, but I'd guess you could work around that.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Jun 2015   #19
GokAy

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ignatzatsonic View Post
Offhand, I can't think of why you want to leave some space unallocated. Maybe someone else has a reason.
I would only think of Over Provisioning on SSDs.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Jun 2015   #20
ignatzatsonic

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1, 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by GokAy View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ignatzatsonic View Post
Offhand, I can't think of why you want to leave some space unallocated. Maybe someone else has a reason.
I would only think of Over Provisioning on SSDs.
Gokay:

Can you confirm that the "over provisioning" area MUST not be in any partition? I've seen conflicting info on this and have never bothered with over provisioning. My partitions and drives are never crowded and I've never had any performance issues.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 <hiberfil.sys> Location » Relocation?




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
Advice Needed for office relocation
Hello, We are moving our small business network to a new office and looking for advice to ensure a seamless transition (the movers come Sunday morning and I need to have the network up and running by Monday morning). Our business network is wired and consists of 1 desktop PC and 2 laptop PC's...
Network & Sharing
What backup & relocation strategy for User profiles and Program Data
Hello, In a configuration with a single HDD with 2 partitions (one for OS+Progs and one for data), how do we properly back up the OS and progs given the fact that the ProgramData and Users folders have been relocated to the Data partition ? In order for the OS and programs to work properly...
Backup and Restore
Hiberfil.sys 6gb why
I have Sleep and Hibernation disabled. I don't use either one of them. Never have used either. I shut my computer off when done. The problem is I still have hiberfil.sys with 6 GB. Can I remove that 6 GB or does it do something else other that Hibernation? What I'm not understanding about this 6...
General Discussion
appdata relocation
wow not posted in this section for ages! Anyway I was just wondering if you can relocate the folder as mine is pretty large and I have 30gb left on my SSD. Are there any potential pitfalls in doing this?
General Discussion
hiberfil.sys
Why do I have this file sitting on c: when Ive never used hibernation and can it be safely removed?
General Discussion


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

© Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:12.

Twitter Facebook Google+



Windows 7 Forums

Seven Forums Android App Seven Forums IOS App