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Windows 7: Having Trouble Running "System File Checker (SFC)"!

05 Oct 2015   #11
Ztruker

Windows 10 Pro X64
 
 

See the 2nd post in this thread: Problem running "sfc /scannow" Error :There is a - Microsoft Community

Quote:
RahulHingonekar replied on

Try as one might and regardless of whether you can boot into Safe Mode or are using the Recovery Console, this error just won’t go away. However, I have found a command finally that overcomes this problem. On a machine that I was working on today, from the Recovery Console command prompt I entered:


dism.exe /image:C:\ /cleanup-image /revertpendingactions


After that, I rebooted the machine into Safe Mode (this particular computer would boot to Safe Mode but is BSODing when booted to normal mode). In Safe Mode, I opened an elevated command prompted and issued the SFC /scannow command and it now runs.

Supposed to fix the error you get when you try to run SFC.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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05 Oct 2015   #12
rubyrubyroo

MS Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit (Family Pack Lic.) Upgrade
 
 
Re: ICIT2LOL

Yes, John, I did indeed-e-o run Memtest86+ already, using no less than five (5) passes in EVERY possible DIMM-to-socket configuration, as there are two OCZ DDR3 SDRAM sticks installed in two sockets. I've also reseated ALL the connections in the system, and done a thorough "de-dusting!" I've cloned it onto another HDD and it does the exact same thing when I ‘drop that one in’ in place of the original HDD.

I can’t do a Repair Install because I can't get into the Windows OS environment in any of it’s incarnations. And while it probably is of no concern to you or anyone else, it IS a 100% legitimate, retail Windows install that I personally preformed on this custom system - but I have no product key sticker. So, when taken along with the fact that there are unreplaceable (many rather expensive) applications installed on my system, this offers a bit of a problem for the clean install route! BUT, if it DOES come to that,’ are there any scripts that you know of, which would run under the limited cmd.exe environment(s) for which I have access, that could decrypt my original Windows Product Key? I'd really prefer to steer clear of anything I can't READ without decompiling a executable file, IOW no “program” that might be preforming any number of nefarious acts completely unbeknownst to me! It should only take a pretty short script...possibly even a BATCH file (if you can remember those dinosaurs!) to decrypt the key if someone is familiar with the technology.

And as you've described all the update woes of others like myself, I should reemphasize that that is part of the reason I'd like to know what caused this catastrophic failure of my system! Because, I very well may bend over and take the loss of my software and settings, et cetera, figure out my product key, go through the clean reinstall, take the time to pick through my drive for any salvageables, update all the way up to present day - picking through the updates as best as I can, only to get the exact same problem at some point during or right after the whole process! This is another reason why I've been trying to ride out the weeks of going through all of this...Believe me I'd love nothing more than to be done with this system!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Oct 2015   #13
rubyrubyroo

MS Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit (Family Pack Lic.) Upgrade
 
 
Re: Ztruker

Hello, Ztruker, and I thank you very much for your help!

Yes, that is precisely the set of switches that I was referring to in my previous post to ICIT2LOL (when I sayed there was a mechanism for DISM.exe to remove this specific flag/lock that SFC is getting hung-up over.) However, the problem is, if you read into the finer details of my issue, I cannot get into Windows in any way, shape or form. If you'll read the quoted text that you sent me, you'll see why the command would not create a so-called 'endless loop' for the individual that posted that message, namely, they COULD load Windows (using Safemode). Thus, the flag/lock is removed when the system is rebooted and THEY never need to enter startup repair/recovery console in order to get a command prompt and then execute SFC, while I, on the other hand, have to do so if I want to have access to any type of command prompt. So the lock/flag is reset at restart by your recommended command, only to be set again before I have any access to anything to be able to run SFC again! That is my intrupretation of the underlying theory...

But, I have no gripes about trying something that has such a low "risk" of harming anything just because it seems that it wouldn't work in the realm of the theoretical though! So I did try it, but kept getting errors. First I mistakenly ran it using "C:\" out of habit, which is actually the boot partition while D:\ is my system drive. It automatically recognized that and ended with an error code (2). Correcting my mistake I tried again and got another error, which I don't remember but was logged somewhere, so I might need to pull that logfile to figure out what's going on. I thought I would try changing the command prompt location to one of the other drives, rather than running it from the "X:\" ramdrive, (who knows why, maybe there's a copy of DISM.exe on the ramdrive and it's acting differently for some reqason!?) and I received another error - a different error ID number each time. And I think I tried to add the /online switch, because I was hoping for anything to work, whether it made sense to me or not - no dice! I tried restarting again and whether I tried to boot to Windows (Normally or Safemode(s)) or booted into startup repair's cmd.exe there was no discernible change to my described problem. SFC just barked the same message back to me when I executed it.

Maybe you could suggest a particular order that you believe to be more likely to get me somewhere. I can boot into the command prompt from the Window 7 installation DVD, system repair/recovery console or using "(F8) - Repair My Computer". I've always been a little unclear as to the difference between the last two methods I just mentioned, but I know the "F8" route asks for a username/password, but getting into the system repair/recovery console before that does not. Clearly there is some difference.

Any thoughts on how I might utilize this tool more effectively in my particular case?

I appreciate your time!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

06 Oct 2015   #14
ICIT2LOL

Desk1 7 Home Prem / Desk2 10 Pro / Main lap Asus ROG 10 Pro 2 laptop Toshiba 7 Pro Asus P2520 7 & 10
 
 

Quote:
Memtest86+ already, using no less than five (5) passes in EVERY possible DIMM-to-socket configuration,
Hello Mike mate it reads no less than five passes but the recommended number of passes is at the very least 8 anything less is just not worth running it. I know it is tedious so was it 8 passes??

Oh that pic of the bike I wanted to show you


Attached Images
Having Trouble Running "System File Checker (SFC)"!-cid_482af939f7e54be79df4515118f4077b-johnpc.png Having Trouble Running "System File Checker (SFC)"!-mebike2.png 
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Oct 2015   #15
Ztruker

Windows 10 Pro X64
 
 

According to this article: Getting out of a no boot situation after installing updates on Windows 7-2008R2 - The Windows Servicing Guy - Site Home - TechNet Blogs

that will work from a booted DVD or flash drive:

Quote:
Getting out of a no boot situation after installing updates on Windows 7-2008R2
joscon [Microsoft]
15 Oct 2009 6:35 AM
A call we receive from time to time is how to enable the rollback of a hotfix when it appears to be in a hung state. Commonly the symptom is that the user has rebooted and is now stuck at a screen which reads "Completing stage 3 of 3" over and over, with the update never completing.
This occurs for several different reasons, but luckily we have a solution in Windows 7 and 2008 R2 (which releases officially this time next week). Its the /revertpendingactions command that I mentioned in an earlier blog entry. I figured I would discuss its usage quickly here based on a conversation I was having with my co-worker the other day about the command.
First, the command is located in the new DISM tool. To utilize this you must reboot the system into the Windows Recovery Environment by either booting from media or choosing F8 on boot for a Windows 7/2008 R2 installation (WinRE is built into installations now). Once you are in the WinRE environment, choose the command prompt option and switch to the root directory of the Windows installation you are repairing.
The run the following command: DISM /image:<drive letter which holds the Windows directory>\ /cleanup-image /revertpendingactions. A sample command for an installation installed to C:\Windows would be:
DISM /image:C:\ /cleanup-image /revertpendingactions
Once this is done you should see some messaging that says:
Reverting pending actions from the image.... The operation completed. Any revert of pending actions will be attempted after reboot.
Reboot your machine and you will now see a new splash screen that says "Reverting pending actions" with a progress indicator in replacement of the previous "Stage 3 of 3" screens.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Oct 2015   #16
rubyrubyroo

MS Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit (Family Pack Lic.) Upgrade
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ICIT2LOL View Post
Quote:
Memtest86+ already, using no less than five (5) passes in EVERY possible DIMM-to-socket configuration,
Hello Mike mate it reads no less than five passes but the recommended number of passes is at the very least 8 anything less is just not worth running it. I know it is tedious so was it 8 passes??

Oh that pic of the bike I wanted to show you
Well, I could point out that eight (8) is in fact NOT less than five (5), so the recommended number of passes is in perfect mathematical agreement with my answer, but I won't (sneaky how I got that one in by saying that I wasn't going to say it, huh?!) But, in all seriousness, the reason that I wrote it that using that particular wording is because I first ran the memory for five passes before touching the sticks physically. Then I switched the placement of the two memory sticks in the two slots and ran it five times. Then I ran stick one in slot one for five passes, then swapped stick one for stick two (5x again), then repeated individual sticks in second slot (5x each), finally returned them to the the original placement and ran it for five passes. Ergo, the two stick, as they were originally positioned, received 10 passes (and recall: 10>8), while all the other possible stic-to-socket combos were given five (5) passes each. But as "it reads" I was never asked to do the swapping, that's all just above and beyond, as were the additional 3 passes of the memory as it was, right? I'll do more, but I didn't think that this level of factual detail was fully appreciated. More is ALWAYS better in this case, but I think eight is arbitrarily chosen by someone that thinks that eight (8) bit's per byte means that eight passes carries it past the numerical digit threshold in a base ten (decimal) system of probability (which is actually a pretty trivial basis for choosing a threshold.)

I'll run it more in the meantime when I have nothing else I might be trying at the time. The more passes the better my odds of catching a mistake of course. It still seems remarkable that the SDRAM would execute, I don't know, millions of processes maybe, some massive number anyway, and NOT ONCE make a mistake while testing them, only to slip up EVERY SINGLE time I try to boot Windows (specifically), which has to be near the one hundredth time by now I'm sure. If even one of those times it actually did load correctly or get a hair farther than it does now, then I could reasonably say that probability has been demonstrated to be potentially involved and I should run as many passes as it takes maybe! But that's just my way of seeing it. Yeah, I guess you could put me in the opinionated category. So what! What's everybody look at! Go back to what you were all doing!...... J/K!


<-----(time-elapse)----->


I've run it eight more times now, which is a total of 18, over twice the recommended number of passes to be used as a minimum. No errors were found with the memory modules.



Oh, and that’s a helluva sweet looking bike from the images you’ve posted, John! I’ll TRY to keep my posts OT as much as I can, by continuing that discussion via PM (ME staying OT... I know...LOL....Ha ha he ho...)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Oct 2015   #17
rubyrubyroo

MS Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit (Family Pack Lic.) Upgrade
 
 

Welcome back, Ztruker! I have tried booting from the Retail Windows Installation DVD (Home Premium, 64 bit) identical to my system, using the command prompt I did the following:

======================================================
Booted from Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit installation DVD:
======================================================



HDD:
  • Part 1: C: System Reserved (Boot Partition) [Active]
  • Part 2: D: Windows System
DVD:
  • E: (Windows Home Premium 64-bit Installation DVD)
Media card drives (Empty):
  • F:
  • G:
  • H:
  • I:
Flash Drive:
  • J: (for saving log files)
Ramdrive:
  • X: "Boot" (created by WinRE)
======================================================

Code:
Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7600]
 
 
X:\Sources>d:
 
D:\>sfc /scannow
 
Beginning system scan.  This process will take some time.
 
 
There is a system repair pending which requires reboot to complete.  
Restart Windows and run sfc again.
 
D:\>notepad.exe
 
D:\>dism /image:D:\ /cleanup-image /revertpendingactions
 
Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool
Version: 6.1.7600.16385
 
Image Version: 6.1.7601.18489
 
The scratch directory size might be insufficient to perform this operation. 
This can cause unexpected behavior.
Use the /ScratchDir option to point to a folder with sufficient scratch space. The recommended size is at least 1024 MB.
 
Reverting pending actions from the image...
 
Error: 0x800f082f
 
An error occurred reverting the pending actions from the image.
For more information, review the log file.
 
The DISM log file can be found at X:\windows\Logs\DISM\dism.log
 
D:\>copy x:\windows\logs\dism\dism.log j:\dism[1].log
        1 file(s) copied.
 
D:\>exit
The log file is, or SHOULD BE attached and named dism[1].log.

I also tried using Windows Advanced Boot Options Menu (using F8 directly following POST). It seems to behave the same way, and neither changed my problem. Here is the second run through...I quickly looked though it and I think it may be the identical results. The disk/partition configuration is identical only the DVD drive is empty this time.

===========================================================
Booted from Windows 7 Home

Premium 64-bit HDD via [F8] >> (Repair Computer) >>(admin acct credentials):
===========================================================

Code:
Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7600]
 
 
X:\windows\system32>notepad.exe
 
X:\windows\system32>D:
 
D:\>sfc /scannow
 
Beginning system scan.  This process will take some time.
 
 
There is a system repair pending which requires reboot to complete.  
Restart Windows and run sfc again.
 
D:\>dism /image:D:\ /cleanup-image /revertpendingactions
 
Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool
Version: 6.1.7600.16385
 
Image Version: 6.1.7601.18489
 
The scratch directory size might be insufficient to perform this operation. 
This can cause unexpected behavior.
Use the /ScratchDir option to point to a folder with sufficient scratch space. The recommended size is at least 1024 MB.
 
Reverting pending actions from the image...
 
Error: 0x800f082f
 
An error occurred reverting the pending actions from the image.
For more information, review the log file.
 
The DISM log file can be found at X:\windows\Logs\DISM\dism.log
 
D:\>copy x:\windows\logs\dism\dism.log j:\dism[2].log
        1 file(s) copied.
 
D:\>exit
The log file is attached as dism[2].log...(Hopefully!)

I tried to use the "/ScratchDir" switch a few times (unsaved) and tried to use somewhere on the main HDD system partition (tried both the root and making a new directory) since there is several hundred GB of free space available to no avail. (The total memory installed in the system is 4GB.) I've tried so many ideas that I don't really remember what it replied with...some error code number I think, but I don't think a reason was explicitly given.


Attached Files
File Type: log dism[1].log (38.0 KB, 0 views)
File Type: log dism[2].log (38.0 KB, 1 views)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Oct 2015   #18
NoelDP

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Win 7 x64 Home Premium (and x86 VirtualBox VM)/Win10
 
 

The Offline SFC scan should be using this command:

SFC /SCANNOW /OFFWINDIR=D:\Windows /OFFBOOTDIR=D:\
or
SFC /SCANNOW /OFFWINDIR=C:\Windows /OFFBOOTDIR=C:\

but not a mix of the two

In the Repair environment - what do you get for
DIR C:\Windows\Servicing
and
DIR C:\Windows\winsx*

??
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Oct 2015   #19
rubyrubyroo

MS Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit (Family Pack Lic.) Upgrade
 
 

Hello NoelDP, thanks for your help!

I have tried that specific combo of switches/parameters, but I will certainly try it again...

C: (system reserved) boot partition (100MB) [ACTIVE]
D: Windows system partition (500GB)

So : SFC /SCANNOW /OFFWINDIR=D:\Windows /OFFBOOTDIR=D:\ I believe you are recommending.

Code:
 
Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7600]
 
 
 
 
 
X:\windows\system32>sfc /SCANNOW /OFFWINDIR=d:\windows /OFFBOOTDIR=d:\
 
 
Beginning system scan.  This process will take some time.
 
 
 
There is a system repair pending which requires reboot to complete.  
Restart
Windows and run sfc again.
 
 
X:\>d:
 
 
D:\windows\system32>sfc /SCANNOW /OFFWINDIR=d:\windows /OFFBOOTDIR=d:\
 
 
Beginning system scan.  This process will take some time.
 
 
 
There is a system repair pending which requires reboot to complete.  
Restart
Windows and run sfc again.
 
 
D:\>dir windows\servicing
 Volume in drive D has no 
label.
 Volume Serial Number is 84CE-B3AE
 
 
 Directory of d:\windows\servicing
 
 
10/18/2011  10:31 AM    
<DIR>          
.
10/18/2011  10:31 AM    
<DIR>          
..
07/13/2009  05:40 
PM            19,456 
CbsApi.dll
07/13/2009  05:40 
PM            28,672 
CbsMsg.dll
10/18/2011  10:31 AM    
<DIR>          
Editions
07/13/2009  09:37 PM    
<DIR>          
en-US
01/30/2015  05:27 PM    
<DIR>          
GC64
09/20/2015  07:45 AM    
<DIR>          
Packages
09/20/2015  07:50 AM    
<DIR>          
Sessions
07/13/2009  06:35 PM    
<DIR>          
SQM
11/20/2010  05:25 
AM           194,048 
TrustedInstaller.exe
10/18/2011  09:01 AM    
<DIR>          
Version
07/13/2009  05:41 
PM            12,288 
wrpintapi.dll
 
4 File(s)        254,464 
bytes
 
9 Dir(s)  370,390,466,560 bytes free
 
 
D:\>dir d:\windows\servicing /a:sh
 Volume in drive D has no 
label.
 Volume Serial Number is 84CE-B3AE
 
 
 Directory of d:\windows\servicing
 
 
File Not Found
 
 
 
D:\>dir windows\winsx*
 Volume in drive D has no 
label.
 Volume Serial Number is 84CE-B3AE
 
 
 Directory of d:\windows
 
 
09/20/2015  07:50 AM    
<DIR>          
winsxs
 
0 
File(s)              
0 
bytes
 
1 Dir(s)  370,390,466,560 bytes free
 
 
D:\>dir windows\winsx* /a:sh
 Volume in drive D has no 
label.
 Volume Serial Number is 84CE-B3AE
 
 
 Directory of d:\windows
 
 
File Not Found
 
 
 
D:\>notepad.exe
 
 
D:\>exit
I'm not sure how to avoid the spacing crap since I'm C/P-ing from command prompt (besides manually which is a major pain). So if you are as annoyed by this as I am and know how to make it format more visually-friendly, I'm all ears!

Thanks!


ADDITION:

Not sure if this helps but:
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Rubyrubyroo
I tracked down a single file that was too corrupt to save logged on the first
day when I ran CHKDSK "Microsoft-Windows-OfflineFiles-Package~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~6.1.7600.16385.cat".
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Oct 2015   #20
NoelDP

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Win 7 x64 Home Premium (and x86 VirtualBox VM)/Win10
 
 

That looks to me like the proper drive should be D:\ .... Try that
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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