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Windows 7: DNS Addressing - How to Change in Windows 7

01 Jul 2009   #9
Zidane24

Windows 7 Home Premium x64 - Mac OS X 10.6.4 x64
 
 
DNS Addressing - How to Change in Windows 7

Introduction



My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jul 2009   #10
z3r010

 

It's worth noting that if you sign up for an opendns account you are able to customize the filtering etc, I found the very handy at small companies to give them an effective web filters.

My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jul 2009   #11
Zidane24

Windows 7 Home Premium x64 - Mac OS X 10.6.4 x64
 
 

awesome guys thanks for the responses! I will include the bit about OpenDNS account memberships and expend a little on setting up for a router based DNS setup (can't go into all routers just because of complexity)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jul 2009   #12
LFB

Windows7 Enterprise SP1 x64 (Technet)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by swarfega View Post
Nice tutorial. I use DNS Advantage after finding OpenDNS had issues with some pages that I regularly visit.
i like this DNS Advantage...

I've always used Open DNS... no problems but now i'll do some tests with this one..
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jul 2009   #13
jblazea50

Windows 7
 
 

gonna try out DNS Advantage...wish they had a dashboard like OpenDNS
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


02 Jul 2009   #14
Barman58

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 x2 + x86 + Windows 8.1 x64 x2
 
 

Just out of interest if anyone wants to try an alternate DNS server this site has a good list of the listed servers for various ISPs world wide ....

PortForward.com - Free Help Setting up Your Router or Firewall

Also useful for those who want to manually enter the address for their own ISP as this information is not always readily available
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jul 2009   #15
Charles Kane

Windows 7 Ultimate, Ubuntu
 
 

Zidane2424: As you are writing for an international audience (not especially an American one) it is unclear to me what, if any relevance this has for non-US based use.
As you can see, I'm in Australia so i was wondering whether the same instructions apply to me or whether even if they do, I would get the benefits you describe?
Alternatively are their equivalent solutions that I might consider?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jul 2009   #16
Charles Kane

Windows 7 Ultimate, Ubuntu
 
 

Having done some research and sought some comments from my ISP here in Australia (Internode), I'm going to have a go at answering my own questions. These answers are based on some pretty quick research none of which was very in depth. However because some of it is based on my Australian ISPs comments, I think it should be taken into account by anyone considering the move to openDNS (or any other DNS).

1. Anyone can use OpenDNS, OpenDNS actually recommends some easy changes to the router (rather than to the LAN settings, though that is fine too.
2. One of the benefits touted to OpenDNS is the control panel control it offers, especially the ability to block addresses. (i.e. content filtering say if you have kids). however to get these "advantages" you will need to register with OpenDNS - which seems a straightforward process. There are plenty of controls one can use through your control panel once you are registered.
3. OpenDNS claims speed improvements to your internet experience through the caching of internet addresses. However the benefits of this claim must be weighed against factors such as your location (I think their main servers are in Palo Alto in the US and maybe London), the quality of your own ISPs caching, and particularly whether your ISP is using any particular servers to provide content.

This means that for me in Australia on Internode, the OpenDNS resolvers are at least 12 hops away from me (if its Palo Alto) - roughly 200ms and the NODE DNS servers are maximum 4 hops away - about 40ms so the benefits may be illusory.

Also, if If I only access domains that are:
- unlikely to have been accessed by anyone at my ISP recently.
- nameservers responding to those domain queries are further away in response time than the the OpenDNS resolvers then there might be a speed increase. A few milliseconds here and there, otherwise the speed benefits may not exist. Network latency dominates DNS resolution time. The Pacific Ocean is the problem here.

Perhaps more importantly is that at least in Australia, as much as we complain, many of our ISPs are of high quality and provide additional benefits (partly because of our distance from e.g. California). In the words of the Internode rep:
Quote:
Whilst customers are free to use it (OpenDNS), we don't recommend it as it will often lead to a lower performance service as, for example, Akamai delivered content will often be delivered from servers off shore rather than on our network.
The Akami delivered content is particularly important with streaming video and audio, but generally things like big downloads and the like. (This includes Microsoft Download and Microsoft Update).

So it seems that if you are accessing addresses which are rarely used and therefore not cached with your ISP you may observe some speed benefits, but at least in Australia, these are going to be pretty marginal.

OpenDNS will give the greatest benefits if you are with a crappy ISP, relatively close to OpenDNS servers, or if you want the benefits of their user control panel (filtering), or only access addresses unlikely to be cached by your ISP or near to you (geographically).

May I suggest that some comment be made in the header of the tutorial which incorporates some of the issues raised here.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jul 2009   #17
Zidane24

Windows 7 Home Premium x64 - Mac OS X 10.6.4 x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Charles Kane View Post
Having done some research and sought some comments from my ISP here in Australia (Internode), I'm going to have a go at answering my own questions. These answers are based on some pretty quick research none of which was very in depth. However because some of it is based on my Australian ISPs comments, I think it should be taken into account by anyone considering the move to openDNS (or any other DNS).

1. Anyone can use OpenDNS, OpenDNS actually recommends some easy changes to the router (rather than to the LAN settings, though that is fine too.
2. One of the benefits touted to OpenDNS is the control panel control it offers, especially the ability to block addresses. (i.e. content filtering say if you have kids). however to get these "advantages" you will need to register with OpenDNS - which seems a straightforward process. There are plenty of controls one can use through your control panel once you are registered.
3. OpenDNS claims speed improvements to your internet experience through the caching of internet addresses. However the benefits of this claim must be weighed against factors such as your location (I think their main servers are in Palo Alto in the US and maybe London), the quality of your own ISPs caching, and particularly whether your ISP is using any particular servers to provide content.

This means that for me in Australia on Internode, the OpenDNS resolvers are at least 12 hops away from me (if its Palo Alto) - roughly 200ms and the NODE DNS servers are maximum 4 hops away - about 40ms so the benefits may be illusory.

Also, if If I only access domains that are:
- unlikely to have been accessed by anyone at my ISP recently.
- nameservers responding to those domain queries are further away in response time than the the OpenDNS resolvers then there might be a speed increase. A few milliseconds here and there, otherwise the speed benefits may not exist. Network latency dominates DNS resolution time. The Pacific Ocean is the problem here.

Perhaps more importantly is that at least in Australia, as much as we complain, many of our ISPs are of high quality and provide additional benefits (partly because of our distance from e.g. California). In the words of the Internode rep:
The Akami delivered content is particularly important with streaming video and audio, but generally things like big downloads and the like. (This includes Microsoft Download and Microsoft Update).

So it seems that if you are accessing addresses which are rarely used and therefore not cached with your ISP you may observe some speed benefits, but at least in Australia, these are going to be pretty marginal.

OpenDNS will give the greatest benefits if you are with a crappy ISP, relatively close to OpenDNS servers, or if you want the benefits of their user control panel (filtering), or only access addresses unlikely to be cached by your ISP or near to you (geographically).

May I suggest that some comment be made in the header of the tutorial which incorporates some of the issues raised here.
Fantastic post. Eventhough it would seem that this is a finished article, I love posts like this that supplement it so well and help me to "beef up" the tutorial to be a complete resource on the subject. Again fantastic and I will get the tutorial up to speed here shortly.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Jul 2009   #18
Zidane24

Windows 7 Home Premium x64 - Mac OS X 10.6.4 x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Zidane2424 View Post
Fantastic post. Eventhough it would seem that this is a finished article, I love posts like this that supplement it so well and help me to "beef up" the tutorial to be a complete resource on the subject. Again fantastic and I will get the tutorial up to speed here shortly.
lol quoting myself

...anyways I did a major overhaul to the tutorial to "broaden the horizons" of it (we all tend to be self-centered aren't we)? This should cover the concerns of just recommending one particular DNS server instead of just alternative DNS servers in general. I hope you guys like the changes....please send me anymore suggestions you can think of so I can give it-it's final polishing (RTM anyone? )
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Jul 2009   #19
streetwolf

Windows 7 x64 RTM Retail
 
 

two things i don't like about opendns. Try entering address CNN and you get an OpenDNS page not CNN.COM. This is if you have the option that adds .com to your address.

Secondly OpenDNS uses google.com for something. I often see it on my status bar before I get to my site.

Trying Advantage right now and CNN works just fine. Will keep an eye if it links out to Google.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 DNS Addressing - How to Change in Windows 7




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