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Windows 7: Partition or Volume - Delete



Partition or Volume - Delete

How to Delete a Partition or Volume in Windows 7 and Windows 8
Published by Brink
22 Jan 2009
Default Partition or Volume - Delete

How to Delete a Partition or Volume in Windows 7 and Windows 8


information   Information
This will show you how to delete a partition or volume on a hard disk using Disk Management or Diskpart in Windows 7 and Windows 8 to create empty unallocated space that you can use to create new partitions with.

Note   Note

  • You will not be able to delete the Windows partition that you are currently logged in to. The only way would be to delete it at boot or during a Windows installation.
  • You also can't delete the system partition, boot partition, or any partition that contains the virtual memory paging file, because Windows needs this information to startup and run properly.
warning   Warning
  • You must be logged on in an administrator account to be able to do this tutorial.
  • When you delete a partition, all data on the partition is erased.
  • If you disable the Disk Defragmenter service, then you will get the error below when you try to do anything in Disk Management. If you get this error, then make sure that the Disk Defragmenter service is set to only Manual.
Name:  Error.jpg
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OPTION ONE
To Delete Partition or Volume using Disk Management
1. Press the Windows + R keys to open the Run dialog, type diskmgmt.msc, and Press Enter.

2. In the middle pane, right click on the partition of a disk that you want to delete, and click/tap on Delete Volume. (see screenshot below)
NOTE: If the partition is a logical partition, then you will need to delete the free space again to have it as unallocated space.
Partition or Volume - Delete-delete_step1.jpg
3. Click/tap on Yes to confirm deletion. (see screenshot below)
Name:  Delete_Step2.jpg
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4. The selected partition (step 2) is now deleted and is unallocated space on the disk. If not, then delete the partition again until it displays as unallocated space like below. (see screenshot below)
NOTE: You can now use this unallocated space to create a new partition with, or extend another adjacent partition on that same hard disk into it.
Partition or Volume - Delete-delete_step3.jpg
5. You can now close Disk Management if you like.



OPTION TWO
To Delete Partition or Volume using Diskpart Command
1. Open an elevated command prompt in Windows 7 or Windows 8, or a command prompt at boot in Windows 7 and Windows 8.

2. In the command prompt, type diskpart and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
Name:  CMD_Delete_Step1.jpg
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3. In the command prompt, type list volume and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
NOTE: This will give you a list of volume numbers to select from to delete.
Name:  CMD_Delete_Step2.jpg
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4. In the command prompt, type select volume # and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
NOTE: You would substitute # for the volume number listed that you want to delete. For example, I want to delete the listed volume 3, so I would type select volume 3 and press Enter.
Name:  CMD_Delete_Step3.jpg
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5. In the command prompt, type delete volume and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
NOTE: If it fails to delete, then use type delete volume override and press enter instead.
Name:  CMD_Delete_Step4.jpg
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6. In the command prompt, type exit and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
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7. Close the command prompt.

8. The selected partition (step 4) is now deleted and is unallocated space on the disk.
NOTE: You can use this unallocated space to create a new partition with, or extend another partition on that same hard disk into it.
That's it,
Shawn




Related Tutorials

Published by
04 Jan 2010   #1
Rurik

Windows 7 home Premium x64
 
 
Removing an old recovery partition

I currently have a partition labeled as a system partition by the command prompt. It is the recovery partition that was originally on my laptop but which has since been wiped. I have now installed windows 7 and would like to know if I should, or can, delete that partition


My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Jan 2010   #2
Brink
Microsoft MVP

64-bit Windows 8.1 Enterprise
 
 

Hello Rurik,

Without that OEM recovery partition, you would not be able to reinstall your previous operating system that came with the computer unless you created a set of recovery discs from it.

If you have create a set of recovery disc, or have no plans of ever reinstalling the OS that came with your computer, then yes you can delete it. However, I would recommend leaving it unless you just really needed the hard drive space back.

Hope this helps,
Shawn
My System SpecsSystem Spec
05 Jan 2010   #3
Rurik

Windows 7 home Premium x64
 
 

Thanks mate, I dont particularly need the space, It has just been annoying me to have it there when I dont think there is anything in there. My harddrive had to be wiped, so I dont think it has anything in there despite it saying it has about 8gb taken
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


05 Jan 2010   #4
Brink
Microsoft MVP

64-bit Windows 8.1 Enterprise
 
 

You're welcome.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Jan 2010   #5
lecseven

Windows 7
 
 

Hello everyone, hope you can help.

Stuck with one simple problem: how do i reallocate space between two partitions? I have shrunk one already - but it just created an empty volume on the same partition. How do i move it to another partition, which I want to become bigger?

Thanks for your help.

PS
Yep, it's russian OS in the screenshot, sorry

PPS
Oh, and BTW - I don't want to delete data on partitions! I just need to reallocate free space.


Attached Thumbnails
Partition or Volume - Delete-discmanagement.jpg  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Jan 2010   #6
Brink
Microsoft MVP

64-bit Windows 8.1 Enterprise
 
 

Hello Lec, and welcome to Seven Forums.

In your case, it would need to use a 3rd party program like Partition Wizard Home Edition to move free space around. Disk Management is limited and will not do that for you without having to delete the partitions.

Hope this helps,
Shawn
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Jan 2010   #7
lecseven

Windows 7
 
 

Thanks for help, Brink, I've already downloaded that wizard - will try it tonight.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Jan 2010   #8
Brink
Microsoft MVP

64-bit Windows 8.1 Enterprise
 
 

Ok. Please let us know how it went for you.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
10 Jan 2010   #9
lecseven

Windows 7
 
 

Sorry, forgot to answer on time.

Partition Wizard Home Edition did the job well, thanks a lot!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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