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Windows 7: Windows Mail


17 Mar 2009   #399
Slartybart

x64 (6.3.9600) Win8.1 Pro & soon dual boot x64 (6.1.7601) Win7_SP1 HomePrem
 
 
Windows Mail

How to Reinstate Windows Mail in Windows 7




My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Apr 2010   #400
poppa bear

Win7 Ultimate 64bit Retail
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Scorpionking259 View Post
I have installed windows mail for windows 7 as per your instructions but
> the icon will not open... when i go to do the registry manually the link
> after classes....eml_auto_file is not there?? Please let me know what i
> am doing wrong.. i went and did it 3 times with no outcome.... Thanks Rick
It's hard to know why without having seen exactly step by step what you did.

If the registry key referred to in Footnote 2 is not present, you don't have to worry about it. That should not be the problem.

I presume the icon you're referring to is the WinMail.exe icon in the Windows Mail folder? This icon becomes visible after running Step 2 to remove WinMail.exe attributes. Re-open Windows Mail folder in Program files to make sure it's visible. In some installations it has been necessary to make this visible using the manual method as shown in Footnote 4.

The system procedure itself works and has been tried and tested on many installions so it's possible one of the steps has not been done properly? If for example, the WinMail.exe icon is clicked before all the steps are done, it will not open, but is seen to be running by Windows. By rebooting your PC this will normally resolve this problem, because it will be shut down in the re-boot.

In essence you should have:
1. Downloaded and run the file WinMailEdit before doing anything else.

2. Run the command: attrib -s -h "%ProgramFiles%\Windows Mail\WinMail.exe" in the Run command box.

3. Downloaded the Take Ownership file and run it.

4. Taken Ownership of the msoe.dll file in Windows Mail folder in Windows 7 program files.

5. Downloaded the appropriate Vista msoe.dll file.

6. Pasted the Vista msoe.dll file into Windows Mail in program files in Windows 7, replacing the original Windows 7 msoe.dll.

7. Sent WinMail.exe to desktop as a shortcut.
Having done that, clicking on the WinMail.exe icon on the desktop should open Windows Mail.


1. Are you getting any error messages?

2. Are you using a 64 or 32bit installation of Windows 7? If it's a 64bit then you only should have downloaded the 64bit Vista msoe.dll file. And it should have only been pasted into the normal Program files, NOT the Program files(x86) which should be left untouched.

3. If you kept a back-up of the original msoe.dll file from Windows Mail in Program files in Windows 7, I'd suggest reinstating this and running the tutorial from the top.

Let me know how you get on.

Cheers PB


My System SpecsSystem Spec
10 Apr 2010   #401
2CR LZW

Win7 Ult-x64
 
 
Windows Mail Help file mail.h1s

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Greg S View Post
Ahh, I just now noticed that the Windows Mail help file doesn't work either. I could have sworn at one time that it did, I guess not. I did find the mail.h1s help file in Vista, replaced it in Win 7 but it was a no show.
Hi Greg S, If there is a downloadable CHM version of the Compiled Microsoft Help file mail.h1s (e.g. Office 2010 Beta Resource Kit Technical Library (Office2010BetaResKit 2.chm) in Compiled Help format [http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=e6dcc787-4653-49da-aeef-564a64dd4ac5]), then after it was downloaded, a simple shortcut to desktop would solve the problem. Alas, I could not find a CHM version of mail.h1s. Had Windows Mail been offered as an "upgrade" option to Windows XP users, there may have been hope.

As you so ingeniously discovered re: using all Vista Windows Mail files vs. using all Windows 7 Windows Mail files except the Windows 7 msoe.dll, the ideal would be to use the Windows 7 mail.h1s file. In addition to the Vista mail.h1s being a foreign help file, it may not have the same links within all of Windows 7 help as Windows 7 mail.h1s.

The question is, whether Windows 7 mail.h1s was disabled itself? (in which case Vista mail.h1s may be the only option), or if it was just disabled through the registry and/or a help file permissions problem.

A security vector resulting from the ability to add help files has been exploited by malware, so Windows uses Microsoft Help Validator Files along with C:\Windows\helppane.exe (Microsoft Help and Support) to minimize that security vector. Windows 7 mail.h1s may require permissions to be reinstated, for which: takeown & icalcs (Take Ownership.reg) or SubInACL may be required in order for a user to be granted the permission, to grant the permissions for Windows 7 mail.h1s. I found these files on Windows 7 Ult.x64:

C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Assistance\Client\1.0\en-US\Help_CValidator.H1D
[Microsoft Help Validator File (.H1D); Attributes: HSAI ]

C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Assistance\Client\1.0\en-US\Help_MValidator.Lck
[LCK File (.Lck); Attributes: HSAI ]

C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Assistance\Client\1.0\en-US\Help_MValidator.H1D
[Microsoft Help Validator File (.H1D); Attributes: HSAI ]
 
One person having a somewhat related problem, tracked down the first two files on Vista [http://forums.techguy.org/windows-vi...-problem.html] by using a Process Monitorfilter to isolate helppane.exe, and then changed the permissions on the two files to allow user access.

If you have Process Monitor, you should be able to track the real-time file system, Registry and process/thread activity using non-destructive filters; and determine where attempting to use mail.h1s fails and the root cause of why. The latest version of Process Monitor v2.8 (Nov 3, 2009), can be downloaded here [http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896645.aspx]. As a side note, the latest version of Process Explorer v12.01 (April 1, 2010), can be downloaded here []Content not found. An interesting comparison may be to use a Process Monitorfilter to isolate WinMail.exe when clicking Windows Mail help on Vista vs. Windows Mail help on Windows 7.
 
It seems that the decision to not use Windows Calendar in Windows 7 was made early on, while the decision to not have Windows Mail as an option, was more of a "last minute" one, if the Local Group Policy Editor (GPedit.ms) is any indication in: Computer Configuration\
Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Calendar => Supported on: Windows Vista only
Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Mail => Supported on: At least Windows Vista
Likewise in: User Configuration\
Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Calendar=> Supported on: Windows Vista only
Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Mail => Supported on: At least Windows Vista
 
There may be hope that the Windows 7 mail.h1s file was fully linked within all of Windows 7 help; and all that is required is Registry key changes and/or the granting of help file permissions. Maybe you can compare the Windows Mail help Registry files on Vista vs. Windows 7. Registry files I found (may be others) related to C:\Windows\Help\Windows\en-US\mail.h1s [H1S File (.h1s); Attributes: A] on Windows 7 Ult.x64:
 
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FileExts\.h1s\OpenWithList
(Default) REG_SZ (value not set)
a REG_SZ (WinMail.exe)
MRUList REG_SZ (a)
 
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FileExts\.h1s\OpenWithProgids
(Default) REG_SZ (value not set)
h1sfile REG_NON (zero length binary value)
 
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FileExts\.h1s\UserChoice
(Default) REG_SZ (value not set)
Progid REG_SZ (Applications\WinMail.exe)
 
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.H1S
(Default) REG_SZ h1sfile
 
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\.H1S
(Default) REG_SZ h1sfile
 
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\h1sfile
(Default) REG_SZ Compiled Windows Help file
FriendlyTypeName REG_EXPAND_SZ %SystemRoot%\System32\apds.dll,-152
NoOpen REG_SZ
 
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\h1sfile\DefaultIcon
(Default) REG_EXPAND_SZ %SystemRoot%\System32\apds.dll,-210
 
I'm not asking you to do anything, only if you still wanted to get the Windows Mail help file (mail.h1s) to work, then perhaps the above may be of some help.
Best regards, 2CR LZW

P.S. I would have provided the Registry files C:\Windows\Help\Windows\en-US\mail.h1s on Vista Ult.x64 except I had a motherboard failure on my M6300 and Dell replaced it for free with the M6400 w/Windows 7 Ult.x64. It was then, I was stunned to learn, that the "security" permission features of UAC denied me access to my own data! Even after using takeown & icalcs, It was still access denied. So I had to swap out the new Windows 7 Ult.x64 hard drive and replace it with the old M6300 Vista Ult.x64 drive in the M6400. I then used Notepad to copy the data to an external drive connected to the M6400, thereby bypassing the OS UAC altogether. After I figure out the size and placement of about a dozen partitions for the 2 new internal drives, I will use Hard Disk Manager 2010 Pro by Paragon to do a P2P Adjust bare-metal system deployment, to make sure I have all of the data, and to export the Vista software settings etc. I'm not sure if by doing so, the date time-stamps of folders and files will be reset, so before I do I will run SubInACL, and then use Robocopy to not only get a log to insure everything was copied, but also to maintain the data date time-stamps. Long story short, it will be awhile before I have a Vista VM onboard.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Apr 2010   #402
ECSA

Windows 7
 
 
Send Mails from EXCEL-2007

Only after having included this entry in the register was possible to send emails from EXCEL-2007.

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Clients\Mail]
@="Windows Mail"
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Apr 2010   #403
dickmiles

Windows 7 home premium
 
 

As a workaround you could try installing just the mail component of Windows Live Mail, because WinLiveMail relies on having the original Windows Mail Folders intact in their original form in order for it to work. When loading it should auto detect if there are any corrupt files and replace them.

Also after loading WinLiveMail run system file check by opening: Start Orb/All Programs/Accessories/Run

In the Run command box type in: sfc /scannow
Then click: OK

Now try running the tutorial from the top.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This sounds scary. If somehow after WinMail is sucessfully installed and in operation, one should accidentally click on Win Live Mail install (maybe from Microsoft Updates or somehow), would all your WinMail be deleted?
Dick
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


11 Apr 2010   #404
poppa bear

Win7 Ultimate 64bit Retail
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by dickmiles View Post
As a workaround you could try installing just the mail component of Windows Live Mail, because WinLiveMail relies on having the original Windows Mail Folders intact in their original form in order for it to work. When loading it should auto detect if there are any corrupt files and replace them.

Also after loading WinLiveMail run system file check by opening: Start Orb/All Programs/Accessories/Run

In the Run command box type in: sfc /scannow
Then click: OK

Now try running the tutorial from the top.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This sounds scary. If somehow after WinMail is sucessfully installed and in operation, one should accidentally click on Win Live Mail install (maybe from Microsoft Updates or somehow), would all your WinMail be deleted?
Dick
This has already been done. After running the tutorial, I have installed the Mail component only of Windows Live, in both a 32 & 64bit installation of Windows 7, and it was possible to run both WinLiveMail and WinMail side by side; and choose either one as default at will. No emails from WinMail were lost or corrupted.

However, in some environments it has been reported that Windows Live Mail needed to be uninstalled before the tutorial would work. I suspect the problems occurred with WinLiveMail when a full import of the Vista Windows Mail folder had been used, instead of just the msoe.dll file, because the native Windows Mail folder in Windows 7 is used by WinLiveMail; and the full Vista import would include Vista files that conflict with WinLiveMail.

The probablility is that if WinLiveMail was installed first, then a full import of Vista Windows Mail folder would bork it by removing needed files. Or the other way round, WinLiveMail would bork WinMail by restoring corrupted files on installation, or on running sfc /scannow, or updates. Prior to the modified method both updates and sfc /scannow were known causes of conflicts.

To ECSA re:
Quote:
Only after having included this entry in the register was possible to send emails from EXCEL-2007.

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Clients\Mail]
@="Windows Mail"
I am running Office 2007 Enterprise, and have been able to send emails from the Excel Spreadsheet interface without needing to instal the registry key mentioned. This could be done with either WinLiveMail or WinMail.exe.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Apr 2010   #405
2CR LZW

Win7 Ult-x64
 
 
Microsoft: Vested Interest in Allowing WinMail on Win7?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by poppa bear;670081Hi 2CR LZW. Thanks for your input and kind remarks. [...
Also, Microsoft informed me that the Windows Mail folder in program files in Windows 7 was put there solely for the purpose of enabling Windows Live Mail to operate. I don't think many people realise this, or the fact that this whole business came about because of problems with fair trading rules in the European market. [...] Cheers PB.
Hi PB,
As applications on portable devices (esp. mobile phones) are increasingly being used to access data, that not long ago was the sole domain of the computer, and as technology changes (e.g. if Sprint's 4G network delivers a 10x increase in speed over 3G) at a fast pace, a shift in consumer preferences may occur sooner than anticipated.

Avoidance of the EU assumed bundling = antitrust violations notwithstanding, the wisdom of having the mail client independent of an OS's product cycle, allows Microsoft the ability to adapt to the marketplace in a timely manner instead of once every three years or so.

While the decision not to have Windows Mail as an official option for Windows 7, was a disappointment to the vast majority of users represented by the over 151,000 views of this tutorial, I understand the reasoning. If not, a good number of people may have downloaded Windows Mail w/o realizing all of the advantages of Windows Live Mail, and the other Live applications. In a competitive marketplace, Microsoft wants the consumer to use the best they have to offer, lest the Windows Mail user, switches to the competitors best w/o giving Windows Live Mail its due.

However, what is deemed best for the majority, may not be for a considerable number of users, pace the number of people and business's that tried Vista and opted for XP. One can read the previous 468 posts in this tutorial for the numerous reasons why, that after trying Windows Live Mail, so many opted to go to extra ordinary means to continue using Windows Mail. For me, it was a business decision.

It seems Windows Live Mail is geared towards families, as when it encounters multiple email accounts, it assumes they represent different family members and each one gets their own set of folders. I use three email accounts for various aspects of the business and 28 subfolders to keep track of all business expenses. No matter what email account the mail is received in, they can easily be sorted into the appropriate expense folder in Windows Mail. In contrast, Windows Live Mail produces 84 folders to keep track of business expenses, which is an additional expense of time (= 3x money), for which the benefits of WLM fail to overcome both the increase in cost; and the decrease in performance due to the additional services required to run WLM. In addition, the benefits of WLM do not justify the increased exposure to security vectors (sync, sharing, remote desktop, etc.) in a business setting. In short, great for families does not = good for business.

Does Microsoft have a vested interest in allowing Windows Mail on Windows 7?
While their steadfast customers wonder if the next month's patch Tuesday for Windows Updates will disable Windows Mail in Windows 7, I hope Microsoft considers the following from a legal point of view:

One could hardly claim you were tying the consumers' hands.

Microsoft would be showing great respect for the decisions of individuals.

Far from inhibiting fair competition, rather than downloading Windows Live Mail, or any of your competitors software, consumer choice went to extraordinary measures to use Windows Mail by Microsoft.

In the global marketplace, Microsoft ensured fair competition, and in contrast to claims our decision was "because it was jammed down our throats" we demonstrate, beyond a shadow of doubt (considering all of the easily obtainable offerings from your competitor's), that we choose Windows Mail based solely on its merits.

From a business perspective your not losing any revenue, both Windows Live Mail & Windows Mail are free.

And more importantly, you won't be losing us to your competitors', but you will be gaining customer loyalty.

Beyond us sevenforums members, who already have Windows 7, killing Windows Mail with an "update," will lose Microsoft revenue, as those who don't upgrade to Windows 7, because they prefer Windows XP/Outlook Express or Vista/Windows Mail to the Windows 7/Windows Live Mail option.

On the 1 year anniversary of Windows 7, graft us back in as an option within WLM (you can hide it deep within the interface options (if its there, we will find it).

However, if that is not possible without making us use all the services (for sync, sharing, remote desktop, etc.) that decrease our performance and needlessly increases our exposure to security vectors, then provide a standalone Windows Mail to download. If an analogy would help, as:

Windows Live Mail is to Windows 7 : Windows Mail is to XP Mode in Windows 7.

PB, if you or any other members, have points to add or subtract, maybe someone could compile a bit more cogent post, and have someone with Microsoft contacts get it to a decision maker, and stop some zealot from killing all the work that went into this Windows Mail tutorial.
Best regards, 2CR LZW
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Apr 2010   #406
poppa bear

Win7 Ultimate 64bit Retail
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by 2CR LZW View Post

PB, if you or any other members, have points to add or subtract, maybe someone could compile a bit more cogent post, and have someone with Microsoft contacts get it to a decision maker, and stop some zealot from killing all the work that went into this Windows Mail tutorial.
Best regards, 2CR LZW
Hi 2CR LZW,

I haven't had time to fully digest your post, but in the main totally agree with the line of reasoning presented. There are a few points I would like to make.

1. I originally became involved in this issue in November 2009, when I did a post for Techspot Forums using information from this forum. I later joined this forum and you know the rest of the story from there. The point is, my Techspot Forum has had close to 6,000 views in just over 4 months, in addition to the 151,000 views on this forum. Considering the original tutorial here started about a year ago, and the back of the problem had been broken, while 6,000 views is comparatively small, it is still relatively significant considering the fact that it only occured late in the day.

2. The broader issue is the swing away from stand alone programs to Windows Live programs which also includes Windows Calendar, and Windows Movie Maker.

Windows Live Movie Maker for example, does not edit MP3 songs which the old Movie Maker did. And the list goes on.

3. The question is, what is the best way to get this across to Microsoft? And in this respect I have corresponded with Microsoft Australia re this issue.

I referred them via links to this tutorial thread, and the Techspot one. And apart from highlighting the general discontent by consumers at the loss of Windows Mail, I also pointed out a few of the more salient posts, including one by a system builder, here, who became so fed up with client's saying they would not buy Windows 7 unless they could get Windows Mail installed, that he developed his own program to import WinMail from Vista.

The person from Microsoft with whom I have been been in contact is:

Jeff Putt, and his email address is: jeffputt@microsoft.com

He advised me that Microsoft are bringing out a Wave 4 version of Windows Live Mail later this month, and asked if I would check it out, which I intend to do.

However, it's not really what I think that matters, but the general ground swell of public consumer opinion. In my humble opinion, the best possible way to get the message across is for as many consumers as possible to voice their disapproval direct to Microsoft. How to enlist them to do this is another matter altogether, of course. Perhaps you would be kind enough to offer any thoughts you might have towards achieving this goal?

As a general aside, I do know Microsoft take notice of consumer feed-back. A few years ago I had a row with MS Australia re activation of WinXP when experimenting with multiple partitions and OSs. I also criticised the fact that the auto options for optical drives had not worked properly in all versions from Win98 to XP, and asked how to turn it off completely. They wanted to charge me $50 for a techo to tell me how to do this, to which I strongly objected. And finally, I pointed out that it was not possible to make a partition active using the Repair utility on boot up from the XP installation CD.

In response, as a gesture of good will, at no cost to me, they upgraded my XP Home Upgrade from Win98, to a retail version of XP Pro with SP2 pre-loaded; and also included in Vista, a single switch to turn off all optical drive auto functions; and also a partition manager in Vista which allowed different partitions to be set as active, as well as an option to re-size partitons. Finally they gave me two free sessions with one of their techos, valued at $50/session. I was quite impressed with this response. And for this reason exhort consumers to make direct contact.

I'd appreciate hearing your, or any other members' thoughts on this issue.

Cheers PB
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Apr 2010   #407
Greg S

Windows 7 Professional 32-bit (6.1, Build 7600)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by 2CR LZW View Post
As you so ingeniously discovered re: using all Vista Windows Mail files vs. using all Windows 7 Windows Mail files except the Windows 7 msoe.dll, the ideal would be to use the Windows 7 mail.h1s file. In addition to the Vista mail.h1s being a foreign help file, it may not have the same links within all of Windows 7 help as Windows 7 mail.h1s..
You are correct, it does not have the same links.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by 2CR LZW View Post
The question is, whether Windows 7 mail.h1s was disabled itself? (in which case Vista mail.h1s may be the only option), or if it was just disabled through the registry and/or a help file permissions problem.
It appears that it is not disabled but it does not contain the proper info, as best I can tell. more on this further down

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by 2CR LZW View Post
Windows 7 mail.h1s may require permissions to be reinstated, for which:
In my simple testing, security was not an issue for Win 7 or Vista help files. Ownership was taken with full privileges added/checked for me as an Admin User.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by 2CR LZW View Post
If you have Process Monitor, you should be able to track the real-time file system, Registry and process/thread activity
I am aware of Process Monitor but used Malware Defender HIPs which logged all activities.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by 2CR LZW View Post
It seems that the decision to not use Windows Calendar in Windows 7 was made early on, while the decision to not have Windows Mail as an option, was more of a "last minute" one, if the Local Group Policy Editor (GPedit.ms) is any indication in: Computer Configuration\
Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Calendar => Supported on: Windows Vista only
Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Mail => Supported on: At least Windows Vista
Likewise in: User Configuration\
Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Calendar=> Supported on: Windows Vista only
Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Mail => Supported on: At least Windows Vista
 
There may be hope that the Windows 7 mail.h1s file was fully linked within all of Windows 7 help; and all that is required is Registry key changes and/or the granting of help file permissions. Maybe you can compare the Windows Mail help Registry files on Vista vs. Windows 7. Registry files I found (may be others) related to C:\Windows\Help\Windows\en-US\mail.h1s [H1S File (.h1s); Attributes: A] on Windows 7 Ult.x64:
 
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FileExts\.h1s\OpenWithList
(Default) REG_SZ (value not set)
a REG_SZ (WinMail.exe)
MRUList REG_SZ (a)
 
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FileExts\.h1s\OpenWithProgids
(Default) REG_SZ (value not set)
h1sfile REG_NON (zero length binary value)
 
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FileExts\.h1s\UserChoice
(Default) REG_SZ (value not set)
Progid REG_SZ (Applications\WinMail.exe)
 
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.H1S
(Default) REG_SZ h1sfile
 
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\.H1S
(Default) REG_SZ h1sfile
 
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\h1sfile
(Default) REG_SZ Compiled Windows Help file
FriendlyTypeName REG_EXPAND_SZ %SystemRoot%\System32\apds.dll,-152
NoOpen REG_SZ
 
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\h1sfile\DefaultIcon
(Default) REG_EXPAND_SZ %SystemRoot%\System32\apds.dll,-210
 
I'm not asking you to do anything, only if you still wanted to get the Windows Mail help file (mail.h1s) to work, then perhaps the above may be of some help.
Best regards, 2CR LZW
Here's where you may have me,lol. I can't remember for sure about comparing the registry for the help files or not. I think that I did but it's been some time back and can't remember for sure. Either way, I don't think the registry in this case would make a difference since the Win 7 help file is incomplete. Granted, one could try as I did to make the Vista help file work but the problem is not security related as mentioned above but the Vista Help file for Win Mail would have to replace the Win 7 Win Mail help file due to the names being the same. Replacing Win 7 Mail help file can not be an option since, although it is incomplete, it carries info for other Windows apps/UI within it. My best guess at how to make it work would have been to merge the two files or edit Win 7 help file with Vista Help file info. If that could be done and it worked, then we would also have to delete the registry reference of the modded help file. The registry ref for this is just like the msoe.dll and it points to winsxs. If it's not removed, the original would be replaced after running SFC/MRT/Some Win updates.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Apr 2010   #408
Greg S

Windows 7 Professional 32-bit (6.1, Build 7600)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by 2CR LZW View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by poppa bear;670081Hi 2CR LZW. Thanks for your input and kind remarks. [...
Also, Microsoft informed me that the Windows Mail folder in program files in Windows 7 was put there solely for the purpose of enabling Windows Live Mail to operate. I don't think many people realise this, or the fact that this whole business came about because of problems with fair trading rules in the European market. [...] Cheers PB.
Hi PB,
As applications on portable devices (esp. mobile phones) are increasingly being used to access data, that not long ago was the sole domain of the computer, and as technology changes (e.g. if Sprint's 4G network delivers a 10x increase in speed over 3G) at a fast pace, a shift in consumer preferences may occur sooner than anticipated.

Avoidance of the EU assumed bundling = antitrust violations notwithstanding, the wisdom of having the mail client independent of an OS's product cycle, allows Microsoft the ability to adapt to the marketplace in a timely manner instead of once every three years or so.

While the decision not to have Windows Mail as an official option for Windows 7, was a disappointment to the vast majority of users represented by the over 151,000 views of this tutorial, I understand the reasoning. If not, a good number of people may have downloaded Windows Mail w/o realizing all of the advantages of Windows Live Mail, and the other Live applications. In a competitive marketplace, Microsoft wants the consumer to use the best they have to offer, lest the Windows Mail user, switches to the competitors best w/o giving Windows Live Mail its due.

However, what is deemed best for the majority, may not be for a considerable number of users, pace the number of people and business's that tried Vista and opted for XP. One can read the previous 468 posts in this tutorial for the numerous reasons why, that after trying Windows Live Mail, so many opted to go to extra ordinary means to continue using Windows Mail. For me, it was a business decision.

It seems Windows Live Mail is geared towards families, as when it encounters multiple email accounts, it assumes they represent different family members and each one gets their own set of folders. I use three email accounts for various aspects of the business and 28 subfolders to keep track of all business expenses. No matter what email account the mail is received in, they can easily be sorted into the appropriate expense folder in Windows Mail. In contrast, Windows Live Mail produces 84 folders to keep track of business expenses, which is an additional expense of time (= 3x money), for which the benefits of WLM fail to overcome both the increase in cost; and the decrease in performance due to the additional services required to run WLM. In addition, the benefits of WLM do not justify the increased exposure to security vectors (sync, sharing, remote desktop, etc.) in a business setting. In short, great for families does not = good for business.

Does Microsoft have a vested interest in allowing Windows Mail on Windows 7?
While their steadfast customers wonder if the next month's patch Tuesday for Windows Updates will disable Windows Mail in Windows 7, I hope Microsoft considers the following from a legal point of view:

One could hardly claim you were tying the consumers' hands.

Microsoft would be showing great respect for the decisions of individuals.

Far from inhibiting fair competition, rather than downloading Windows Live Mail, or any of your competitors software, consumer choice went to extraordinary measures to use Windows Mail by Microsoft.

In the global marketplace, Microsoft ensured fair competition, and in contrast to claims our decision was "because it was jammed down our throats" we demonstrate, beyond a shadow of doubt (considering all of the easily obtainable offerings from your competitor's), that we choose Windows Mail based solely on its merits.

From a business perspective your not losing any revenue, both Windows Live Mail & Windows Mail are free.

And more importantly, you won't be losing us to your competitors', but you will be gaining customer loyalty.

Beyond us sevenforums members, who already have Windows 7, killing Windows Mail with an "update," will lose Microsoft revenue, as those who don't upgrade to Windows 7, because they prefer Windows XP/Outlook Express or Vista/Windows Mail to the Windows 7/Windows Live Mail option.

On the 1 year anniversary of Windows 7, graft us back in as an option within WLM (you can hide it deep within the interface options (if its there, we will find it).

However, if that is not possible without making us use all the services (for sync, sharing, remote desktop, etc.) that decrease our performance and needlessly increases our exposure to security vectors, then provide a standalone Windows Mail to download. If an analogy would help, as:

Windows Live Mail is to Windows 7 : Windows Mail is to XP Mode in Windows 7.

PB, if you or any other members, have points to add or subtract, maybe someone could compile a bit more cogent post, and have someone with Microsoft contacts get it to a decision maker, and stop some zealot from killing all the work that went into this Windows Mail tutorial.
Best regards, 2CR LZW
Yea, I quoted it all! I think it's worth reading again because I like what you wrote. I will be one of the ones who fall into the category of using something else other than Windows Live anything other than their Live System Cleaner. It seems to do an excellent job although I use it as reference only when it comes to the reg cleaning part. I gather the info and clean it myself.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Apr 2010   #409
licensecart

Windows 7
 
 

thankss, i am interested in this
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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