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Windows 7: Windows Mail


17 Mar 2009   #499
Slartybart

x64 (6.3.9600) Win8.1 Pro & soon dual boot x64 (6.1.7601) Win7_SP1 HomePrem
 
 
Windows Mail

How to Reinstate Windows Mail in Windows 7



My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

19 May 2010   #500
bjproc

Win 7 Pro 32bit
 
 

to be honest, i do like the simplicity of windows mail, it does all i want it to do, i don't use it for any type of business, just for emails to folk i know, parents, brother, partner etc.

i've blocked the offending update on my 7 H/P HTPC, but i installed it on my main 7 Pro PC before i knew what it did

i've installed outlook on my main PC and it'll take a bit of time to get used to it and if theres more of these updates from M$, it looks like i'll install outlook on my HTPC as i really can't be bothered about having to search through all the updates that M$ put out which could screw this up again.

one thought is though, if M$ aren't supporting WM as an email client, whay have the windows mail folder in program files in the first place?, does windows live mail use any of it?

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

19 May 2010   #501
poppa bear

Win7 Ultimate 64bit Retail
 
 

To alientrader,

roncerr has pretty well answered your queries, but here are a few pointers. Re:
Quote:
First, in step 2, you have a space between Windows and Mail. Is this right?
The safest and easiest way is to copy and paste the code in the box shown as is suggested in Step 2. This way there can be no mistakes. To do this:

- Highlight the code shown in the box in step 2 --> Right click the highlighted code --> Click: Copy in the drop down menu.

- Open the Run command by going to: Start Orb --> All Programs --> Accessories --> Run

- Past the code into the Run command box by placing your mouse pointer in the empty box --> Right click --> click: Paste --> Click: OK.

Re:
Quote:
2nd in step 3, note 1, WinMail file is there, WinMailEdit folder is there, but the WinMail.exe is missing. This is probably why I can't get it to work, but I followed your instructions explicitly, all the way through.
There seems to be some misunderstanding. WinMailEdit is not an operating system folder. It is a zipped folder containing a registry edit file that is downloaded from the download link in Step 1. It works by simply extracting the WinMailEdit file and clicking it, and following the prompts. Once this is done, you don't need it again.

In Program files you have a folder called Windows Mail. Inside that folder is a hidden file called WinMail.exe.

Quote:
Footnote 4 >WINDOWS MAIL> TOP TASK BAR>TOOLS> ETC. There is no tools button on the top task bar, or anywhere else in this window.
You are correct in so far as the tutorial assumes you know how to make the Menu bar visible. This is done by opening any folder and going to:

Top Task Bar --> Organize --> Layout --> Tick: Menu Bar. The menu bar will now be visible above the original task bar, and contains the Tools option.


Re roncerr's statement:
Quote:
Although they may not have spelled it out, you must also "show file extensions" to see the ".exe" in "WinMail.exe".
Part of Footnote 4 specifically says:
Quote:
Untick: Hide empty drives... Hide extensions... Hide protected operating...
If the 'Hide extensions' option had been unticked you would have seen the .exe on the end of WinMail.exe.

Re:
Quote:
2nd in step 3, note 1, WinMail file is there... but the WinMail.exe is missing
WinMail file is the WinMail.exe file with the .exe file extension hidden.

What I don't understand is how you got the WinMail file to show up at all in the Windows Mail folder?

One the one hand, if you had successfully run Step 2, it would show WinMail.exe with the .exe file extension on the end, or not show up at all. Step 2 either totally works or not at all.

On the other hand, if Step 2 didn't work, and you didn't know how to run Footnote 4, how did you get it to show up? It could only show up as WinMail without the .exe extension by using footnote 4 but leaving "Hide file extensions..." ticked.

Re:
Quote:
Also, where do you go to restore Default View Settings, if you ever do get this to work?
When you ran Footnote 4 and opened the View tab, at the bottom of that window it has a button that reads: "Restore Defaults". Simply click this button.

To roncerr re:
Quote:
So that to restore our Windows Mail functionality with the needed security we have to replace the .dll again with an updated copy when it's added to the tutorial.
You're quite right. The msoe.dll does have to be replaced with an updated one, and this is available from the download buttons in Step 4 of the main tutorial on page 1 of the thread. However, I would be very surprised if this is further updated, as hopefully there is only the single security vulnerability, which is fixed by the updated msoe.dll. At least that's what Microsoft said in their post on it.

Note that once the Microsoft update is loaded on your PC, and you've replaced the current msoe.dll with the upgraded one, you don't have to remove/block this update; and your mail is now safe from the potential security breach. In fact on my 32bit installation of Windows 7, the update didn't even bork Windows Mail.

To bjproc re:
Quote:
one thought is though, if M$ aren't supporting WM as an email client, why have the windows mail folder in program files in the first place?, does windows live mail use any of it?
Yes, the purpose of the Windows Mail folder is to allow Windows Live Mail to operate. The whole problem came about through problems M$ was having with the European market fair trading laws. M$ couldn't decide between having two versions of Windows 7; one for the Western Market, and one for the European market... or one version without Windows Mail, which is what we've got now.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 May 2010   #502
alientrader1

Windows 7 Ultimate
 
 
Still no Windows Mail

Hey Poppa Bear,

Thanks for the tips, but still can't get WinMail working. The tip about finding the

toolbar under Organize was great! Typical M$ though, what a misnomer for finding

the toolbar. Why is the toolbar not always visible?

Do I need to uninstall Windows Live Mail for this to work?

Also, somewhere the tutorial said to Start>Control Panel>Folder Options, but you

have to Start>Control Panel>Appearance first to see the Folder Options. The only

reason I mention this, is that it took me quite awhile to find it.

When you say Start Orb, is the Orb significant, as I have never seen this before.

Lastly, I have a folder in WinMail called msoe_64, and a file called MSOERES.dll,

along with the standard msoe.dll file. Could one of these be causing my problem?

Thanks for any help,

Barry
My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 May 2010   #503
poppa bear

Win7 Ultimate 64bit Retail
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by alientrader1 View Post
Hey Poppa Bear,

Thanks for the tips, but still can't get WinMail working. The tip about finding the

toolbar under Organize was great! Typical M$ though, what a misnomer for finding

the toolbar. Why is the toolbar not always visible?

Do I need to uninstall Windows Live Mail for this to work?

Also, somewhere the tutorial said to Start>Control Panel>Folder Options, but you

have to Start>Control Panel>Appearance first to see the Folder Options. The only

reason I mention this, is that it took me quite awhile to find it.

When you say Start Orb, is the Orb significant, as I have never seen this before.

Lastly, I have a folder in WinMail called msoe_64, and a file called MSOERES.dll,

along with the standard msoe.dll file. Could one of these be causing my problem?

Thanks for any help,

Barry
Hi Barry,

First off I've got to correct wrong information I gave you in my earlier post... sorry about that. Set out below is picture of a 64bit Windows Mail folder. As you can see, WinMail file is visible without the .exe file extension. This means you ran Step 2 correctly, which is a better way than manually changing folder view options which is only temporary. Using Step 2 the WinMail folder is permanently visible.

Click on the picture to enlarge it.

Windows Mail-capture.png

Just to make sure we're on the same page, I assume your copy of Windows 7 is the 64bit version? If this is correct, there are two Windows Mail folders; one in the normal 64bit Program files and one in the 32bit Program files(x86). Ignore the one in the 32bit Program files(x86) ,and only work on the one in normal 64bit Program files - See Footnote 3 of main tutorial. The following pic shows where the two sets of Program files are stored.

Windows Mail-program-files-x86-.png


1. As you can see in the first pic both the MSOERES.dll & msoe.dll files are present in the Windows Mail folder, but not msoe_64. As a first step you could try deleting this file, but before doing so, make a back-up copy for safety and save it in a storage folder. You will probably have to Take Ownership of it before you will able to remove it.

2. It is necessary to install the Microsoft update KB978542 before installing the msoe.dll file downloaded in step 4 of main tutorial. If you install the update after installing the msoe.dll, the update will modify it and hence bork it. So I'm assuming you've already downloaded the update.

3. I'm also assuming you have successfully run the WinMailEdit registry editor in Step 1. If not, download it and run it.

4. Delete the msoe.dll you have in Windows Mail using Take Ownership if necessary.

5. Download the modified 64bit Vista msoe.dll file from the 2nd download button in Step 4 of the main tutorial.

6. Install this downloaded msoe.dll file into the Windows Mail folder.

6. Right click the WinMail file and send to desktop as a shortcut.

7. Shut everything and re-boot your PC.

Now try opening Windows Mail by clicking on the WinMail shortcut. Note: It usually takes 8 -12 seconds to open, and when it does, it should prompt you to set Windows Mail as default mail client. Choose "yes" for default; and "no" for the option to show this selection window every time WinMail starts.

In some environments Windows Live Mail can stop Windows Mail working. Therefore, if it is still not working, save all your emails, and uninstall Windows Live Mail. Warning: Be sure to do this through: Control Panel --> Programs & Features --> Uninstall - by clicking Windows Live Mail. Also uninstall any other related Windows Live Mail programs.

Reboot once again, and see if this fixes it.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 May 2010   #504
Moonlight

Windows 7 Ultimate
 
 

I want to add my thank you, Mark. I lost my ability to open WinMail when I allowed KB978542 to install today. I knew right where to come for a fix.

Thanks, again. ~ Gail
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 May 2010   #505
MaximusCommodus

Windows 7 - 64 bit Home Premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Moonlight View Post
I want to add my thank you, Mark. I lost my ability to open WinMail when I allowed KB978542 to install today. I knew right where to come for a fix.

Thanks, again. ~ Gail
Unfortunately Microsoft file KB 97842 blocked WinMail forever unless you like Mail Live I hate personally or you can use Microsoft Outlook
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 May 2010   #506
MaximusCommodus

Windows 7 - 64 bit Home Premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by alientrader1 View Post
Hey Poppa Bear,

Thanks for the tips, but still can't get WinMail working. The tip about finding the

toolbar under Organize was great! Typical M$ though, what a misnomer for finding

the toolbar. Why is the toolbar not always visible?

Do I need to uninstall Windows Live Mail for this to work?

Also, somewhere the tutorial said to Start>Control Panel>Folder Options, but you

have to Start>Control Panel>Appearance first to see the Folder Options. The only

reason I mention this, is that it took me quite awhile to find it.

When you say Start Orb, is the Orb significant, as I have never seen this before.

Lastly, I have a folder in WinMail called msoe_64, and a file called MSOERES.dll,

along with the standard msoe.dll file. Could one of these be causing my problem?

Thanks for any help,

Barry
Microsoft Security file KB 978542 blocked Win Mail forever because they want you to use Mail Live personally I hate ( very stupid designed by Microsoft people ) or you can use Microsoft Outlook or some of free email software out there but some of them doesn't work on Windows 7 at all
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 May 2010   #507
MaximusCommodus

Windows 7 - 64 bit Home Premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by poppa bear View Post
To alientrader,

roncerr has pretty well answered your queries, but here are a few pointers. Re:
Quote:
First, in step 2, you have a space between Windows and Mail. Is this right?
The safest and easiest way is to copy and paste the code in the box shown as is suggested in Step 2. This way there can be no mistakes. To do this:

- Highlight the code shown in the box in step 2 --> Right click the highlighted code --> Click: Copy in the drop down menu.

- Open the Run command by going to: Start Orb --> All Programs --> Accessories --> Run

- Past the code into the Run command box by placing your mouse pointer in the empty box --> Right click --> click: Paste --> Click: OK.

Re:
Quote:
2nd in step 3, note 1, WinMail file is there, WinMailEdit folder is there, but the WinMail.exe is missing. This is probably why I can't get it to work, but I followed your instructions explicitly, all the way through.
There seems to be some misunderstanding. WinMailEdit is not an operating system folder. It is a zipped folder containing a registry edit file that is downloaded from the download link in Step 1. It works by simply extracting the WinMailEdit file and clicking it, and following the prompts. Once this is done, you don't need it again.

In Program files you have a folder called Windows Mail. Inside that folder is a hidden file called WinMail.exe.

You are correct in so far as the tutorial assumes you know how to make the Menu bar visible. This is done by opening any folder and going to:

Top Task Bar --> Organize --> Layout --> Tick: Menu Bar. The menu bar will now be visible above the original task bar, and contains the Tools option.


Re roncerr's statement:Part of Footnote 4 specifically says:If the 'Hide extensions' option had been unticked you would have seen the .exe on the end of WinMail.exe.

Re:WinMail file is the WinMail.exe file with the .exe file extension hidden.

What I don't understand is how you got the WinMail file to show up at all in the Windows Mail folder?

One the one hand, if you had successfully run Step 2, it would show WinMail.exe with the .exe file extension on the end, or not show up at all. Step 2 either totally works or not at all.

On the other hand, if Step 2 didn't work, and you didn't know how to run Footnote 4, how did you get it to show up? It could only show up as WinMail without the .exe extension by using footnote 4 but leaving "Hide file extensions..." ticked.

Re:When you ran Footnote 4 and opened the View tab, at the bottom of that window it has a button that reads: "Restore Defaults". Simply click this button.

To roncerr re:
Quote:
So that to restore our Windows Mail functionality with the needed security we have to replace the .dll again with an updated copy when it's added to the tutorial.
You're quite right. The msoe.dll does have to be replaced with an updated one, and this is available from the download buttons in Step 4 of the main tutorial on page 1 of the thread. However, I would be very surprised if this is further updated, as hopefully there is only the single security vulnerability, which is fixed by the updated msoe.dll. At least that's what Microsoft said in their post on it.

Note that once the Microsoft update is loaded on your PC, and you've replaced the current msoe.dll with the upgraded one, you don't have to remove/block this update; and your mail is now safe from the potential security breach. In fact on my 32bit installation of Windows 7, the update didn't even bork Windows Mail.

To bjproc re:
Quote:
one thought is though, if M$ aren't supporting WM as an email client, why have the windows mail folder in program files in the first place?, does windows live mail use any of it?
Yes, the purpose of the Windows Mail folder is to allow Windows Live Mail to operate. The whole problem came about through problems M$ was having with the European market fair trading laws. M$ couldn't decide between having two versions of Windows 7; one for the Western Market, and one for the European market... or one version without Windows Mail, which is what we've got now.
Microsoft Security file KB 978542 blocked Win Mail forever so good bye Win Mail and they want you to use Mail Live ( personally I hate this stupid Microsoft program ) unless you use Microsoft Outlook or some free email software out there but some of them doesn't work on Windows 7
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 May 2010   #508
Moonlight

Windows 7 Ultimate
 
 

Hi Maximus ~ I uninstalled KB978542, and hid it in Updates so I won't mistakenly install it again. After following Mark's tutorial carefully, WinMail works fine for me in my 64-bit Windows 7, just as it did before.

From now on, I will be sure to READ what each Update affects, AND check this forum, before I blithely allow any of them to install. I've learned my lesson. ~ Gail
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 May 2010   #509
poppa bear

Win7 Ultimate 64bit Retail
 
 

To MaximusCommodus re:
Quote:
Unfortunately Microsoft file KB 97842 blocked WinMail forever unless you like Mail Live I hate personally or you can use Microsoft Outlook
To Moonlight re:
Quote:
I uninstalled KB978542, and hid it in Updates so I won't mistakenly install it again. After following Mark's tutorial carefully, WinMail works fine for me in my 64-bit Windows 7, just as it did before.

From now on, I will be sure to READ what each Update affects, AND check this forum, before I blithely allow any of them to install. I've learned my lesson. ~ Gail
With all due respect, you're both missing the point.

Update KB978542 was created to protect users from a security breach issue detected in the msoe.dll file in the Windows Mail folder, so it's basically a good thing. If it hadn't come out, the msoe.dll in your Windows Mail would have been vulnerable to breaches of security. The problem is it modifies the hacked msoe.dll file used in the tutorial, and hence stops Windows Mail working.

So you now need a new Vista msoe.dll which has been modified by update KB978542 in order to get the security protection. The msoe.dll available in the download button in Step 4 of the tutorial on page 1 of this thread contains this modified security protected Vista msoe.dll file.

All you need to do to restore Windows Mail is replace the existing msoe.dll file in Windows Mail with the msoe.dll available from the download button in Step 4 on Page 1 of this thread, after you have downloaded update KB978542.

It is best NOT to remove update KB978542 for two reasons.

1. By leaving it there it will not be downloaded again in any future updates, because it's already there. If it is downloaded after the repairs are done, it will bork Windows Mail again, and you will have to repair it again.

2. It ensures that any security protection it gives to any other related ancillary files in Windows Mail folder will be preserved.

In your case Moonlight it means if you want to get this update back, you will then have to replace the msoe.dll file again.

Cheers PB
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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