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Windows 7: Windows 7 OEM Key work with both 32 and 64 bit?


06 Apr 2010   #1

Main system i use is Linux Fedora. I also use Windows 7 Home Premium.
 
 
Windows 7 OEM Key work with both 32 and 64 bit?

Hi there. Does a Windows 7 Home Premium OEM key work with the 64-bit version as well?

If I activate the key with the 32-bit version of Home Premium OEM and later install the 64-bit version of Home Premium OEM will it still activate on that hardware?

The reason i ask is I want to buy the 64-bit version so i have the disc at hand if i need it in the future.

The key will be activated on the 32-bit version.

EDIT:
I bought Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit OEM and activated the key on a Home Premium x86 OEM installation.

Jonathon


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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06 Apr 2010   #2

Win7 HP (x64)/Win7 Ultimate (x64)
 
 

Hi Jonathon

Following is from Microsoft site:

Does this require two different licenses, or can I use the same license and product key for both images/partitions, since they are both on a single system that can use only one operating system at a time?
A. A customer who wants Microsoft Windows installed onto two partitions of a computer system will need to obtain two OEM System Builder Windows software licenses. OEM software generally does not permit simultaneous usage of a PC by two end users.


Q. Can a PC with an OEM Windows operating system have its motherboard upgraded and keep the same license? What if it was replaced because it was defective?
A. Generally, an end user can upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on a computer—except the motherboard—and still retain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created. Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred to the new computer, and the license of new operating system software is required. If the motherboard is replaced because it is defective, you do not need to acquire a new operating system license for the PC as long as the replacement motherboard is the same make/model or the same manufacturer's replacement/equivalent, as defined by the manufacturer's warranty.
The reason for this licensing rule primarily relates to the End User Software License Terms and the support of the software covered by that End User Software License Terms. The End User Software License Terms is a set of usage rights granted to the end user by the PC manufacturer and relates only to rights for that software as installed on that particular PC. The system builder is required to support the software on the original PC. Understanding that end users, over time, upgrade their PCs with different components, Microsoft needed to have one base component "left standing" that would still define the original PC. Since the motherboard contains the CPU and is the "heart and soul" of the PC, when the motherboard is replaced (for reasons other than defect) a new PC is essentially created. The original system builder did not manufacture this new PC, and therefore cannot be expected to support it.



Hope this answers your question

Regards
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Apr 2010   #3

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1, clean install, upgrade disc
 
 

Welcome,

Yes one key will be good for both 32 and 64 bit versions. Just to make sure that you understand the OEM is different from other keys. You can use it on only one computer; not one at a time, only one

If you plan to buy another computer in the future or if you plan to buy a new MotherBoard, for other than repairs, you should get a regular license (as suggested above).

If you fill out the spec section (from your cp, (control panel), we can advise, if 64 bit would be a worthwhile investment>

Take care.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


06 Apr 2010   #4

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Wait so if I have an OEM license but by computer needs wiped in the future - im screwed??
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Apr 2010   #5

Main system i use is Linux Fedora. I also use Windows 7 Home Premium.
 
 

Hi Lomai. Thanks for the reply. "Does this require two different licenses, or can I use the same license and product key for both images/partitions, since they are both on a single system that can use only one operating system at a time?

A customer who wants Microsoft Windows installed onto two partitions of a computer system will need to obtain two OEM System Builder Windows software licenses. OEM software generally does not permit simultaneous usage of a PC by two end users."

It appears from reading the quote above that Microsoft regard an installation (partition image included) as a single user despite the fact that it is installed on the same hardware as is pointed out in the last part of the sentence. From this point of view the serial seems unlikely to be valid on a 64-bit OEM version if it has already been validated on the 32-bit OEM version on that hardware.

It's clear that Microsoft doesn't want the end user to have the privilege of migrating to the other version even though the difference between the two versions is relatively small. OEM means the end user can do nothing further with the installation other than what the original OEM installation disc provides.

My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Apr 2010   #6

Win7 HP (x64)/Win7 Ultimate (x64)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by jonathon View Post
Hi Lomai. Thanks for the reply. "Does this require two different licenses, or can I use the same license and product key for both images/partitions, since they are both on a single system that can use only one operating system at a time?


It appears from reading the quote above that Microsoft regard an installation (partition image included) as a single user despite the fact that it is installed on the same hardware as is pointed in the last part of the sentence. From this point of view the serial seems unlikely to be validated on a 64-bit OEM version if it has already been validated on the 32-bit OEM version on that hardware.

It's clear that Microsoft don't want the end user to have the privilege of migrating to the other version even though even the difference between the two versions is relative small. OEM means the end user can do nothing further with the installation than what is given with the original OEM installation disc.

Since this is the case the solution to my problem would be if somebody could send me a 'boot image' made with Ultraiso or geteltorito using linux so i can unlock the windows7 x86 disc and see if it will install 64-bit version as well using the boot image from a windows7 64 DVD.

Some other boot image extraction tools such as bbie provided a boot image that would not work for me when i created Windows 7 bootable disc under linux.

This is my how to that i wrote in fedoraforum
How to edit Windows 7 Install DVD - Extract boot image and create iso - FedoraForum.org

Hi Jonathon

What little I understand about the licensing scheme for retail media (as opposed to OEM-media), is that you can use either the 32-bit or 64-bit at any one time i.e. not both at the same time on separate partitions.

I'm not sure about subsequent re-activations, some of the more experienced users on this site will provide further information on that.


Hope I have been of some help and regards
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Apr 2010   #7

Win7 HP (x64)/Win7 Ultimate (x64)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by simpod View Post
Wait so if I have an OEM license but by computer needs wiped in the future - im screwed??
Hi simpod,

I believe that as long as the original motherboard has not been changed, you can continue to use the OEM media.

Regards
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Apr 2010   #8

Main system i use is Linux Fedora. I also use Windows 7 Home Premium.
 
 

I guess a single product key will be OK for both versions if it has not been activated. Only one way to find out for sure.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Apr 2010   #9

Win7 HP (x64)/Win7 Ultimate (x64)
 
 

My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Apr 2010   #10
Microsoft MVP

 

With any Windows 7 license, you can reinstall either 32bit or 64bit of the same version.

You can always reinstall Windows 7 as many times as you please. It should not even require the robocall to MS if it is on the same hardware signature.

Any retail copy of Windows 7 except OEM can migrate to the machine of your choice, requiring an activation robocall to MS to reset the hardware signature.

There are multiple reliable reports that MS is allowing exceptions for mobo and even computer change with Builder's OEM however this can not be relied upon as it is case-by-case basis.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Windows 7 OEM Key work with both 32 and 64 bit?




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