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Windows 7: Backup strategy and solution

01 Mar 2018   #1
scripttron75

Windows 7 pro 64 bit
 
 
Backup strategy and solution

Hello, I have Novastor for desktop PC and i am trying to figure out best way to backup C drive OS and Data drive D where i install games, large apps etc. since a restore of C would still require a installation of everything that was on D what can be done to execute this issue.

windows 7 pro 64bit,

C drive - OS

D drive - Data

I have plenty of space on external drives for storage backup.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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01 Mar 2018   #2
RolandJS

Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
 
 

If I understand your question set, yes, what you want can be done:
Make routine backups of your OS and Data partitions roughly at the same time, meaning, immediately after backing up C, you back up D; both of those full images onto external media.
Then, if/when you must restore C, the OS, you restore first C, then D, one after the other.
Also, you can make a full image of both C and D together, then that one full image is all you need to restore.
** However, the partitions' sizes must not have been altered in between backup routines if you desire effortless restores. **
That's the only way I know of -- maybe others here can chime in with better ideas :)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Mar 2018   #3
scripttron75

Windows 7 pro 64 bit
 
 

Also to note C and D are on different drives not same drive with split partitions.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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01 Mar 2018   #4
RolandJS

Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by scripttron75 View Post
Also to note C and D are on different drives not same drive with split partitions.
Ok, simply make a full image of C and a full image of D onto external media during the same backup session. Then, if/when a restore is needed, restore both C and D during the same restore session.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Mar 2018   #5
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

I'm not sure why you have to back up D whenever you back up C. One of the key benefits of putting your data on a different drive than the OS is that you can back up the two drives independently of each other.

You don't need to back up Windows very often, because it doesn't change very often, unless you install or uninstall a program, rearrange your Windows desktop, or create or delete users. Those things don't happen very often, so you don't need to do a Windows backup very often. (You may install Windows updates regularly, but you don't have to back those things up, because if you lose them, all you need to do is run updates again.)

On the other hand, your data regularly changes; so you do need to back up your data regularly, either by saving two copies in separate locations, or by doing an actual backup of your data drive.

Another thing to consider is, how often can you get yourself to actually do a backup? I can get myself to do it about once every other month. Therefore, I backup my data about once every other month. But I rarely back up my OS, because it doesn't change much.

Also, how many backups will you keep? Unless you keep buying drives, there is only so much room for backups, so you will have to delete some to make room for others.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Mar 2018   #6
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
...(You may install Windows updates regularly, but you don't have to back those things up, because if you lose them, all you need to do is run updates again.)...But I rarely back up my OS, because it doesn't change much...
Actually, you should make an image of your OS and programs before downloading and applying any updates. Not all updates to software are better than the previous version. Bad updates have been known to brick computers and a recent image would be necessary to resuscitate the computer without having to reinstall the OS and years of updates. Some MS updates cannot be removed once installed.

It takes very little time to start the imaging process, then you can just walk away and forget it until finished or you can continue to use the computer.

As far as how long and how many images to keep goes, that will vary from individual to individual. I keep all images for two months, then keep only the first image of the month after that for the rest of the year, then I cull that down to one image every six months.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Mar 2018   #7
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post
Actually, you should make an image of your OS and programs before downloading and applying any updates. Not all updates to software are better than the previous version. Bad updates have been known to brick computers and a recent image would be necessary to resuscitate the computer without having to reinstall the OS and years of updates. Some MS updates cannot be removed once installed.

It takes very little time to start the imaging process, then you can just walk away and forget it until finished or you can continue to use the computer.

As far as how long and how many images to keep goes, that will vary from individual to individual. I keep all images for two months, then keep only the first image of the month after that for the rest of the year, then I cull that down to one image every six months.
I agree with you, with the following modification: you need to have a good backup available whenever you do updates. If the newest one you currently have isn't close enough to your current Windows setup, then you need to do another one before you do updates. However, if you have a good Windows backup that is, say, three months old, and you haven't installed anything or made any other changes to Windows, then that backup will suffice. In other words, if you have a backup which will get you close enough to where you are now, then that will suffice, even if it is several months old.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Mar 2018   #8
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
I agree with you, with the following modification: you need to have a good backup available whenever you do updates. If the newest one you currently have isn't close enough to your current Windows setup, then you need to do another one before you do updates. However, if you have a good Windows backup that is, say, three months old, and you haven't installed anything or made any other changes to Windows, then that backup will suffice. In other words, if you have a backup which will get you close enough to where you are now, then that will suffice, even if it is several months old.
That's pretty much what I said in just the first sentence. I don't do System Backups on a schedule—that would be pointless. I only make an image just before I download and install updates to the OS or programs. Win 7 has at least one batch of updates every month and my programs altogether have several in a month. I don't see how you, or anyone else, can go several months between updates of any kind.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Mar 2018   #9
dg1261

Windows 7/8.1/10/XP multiboot
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post
I don't see how you, or anyone else, can go several months between updates of any kind.
For the past half-decade I've been updating no more frequently than every 6 months, if that. I update my VMs about once a year.

OTOH, I also seem to be avoiding all the anguish and constant problems from buggy Microsoft updates.

I guess it all depends on where you perceive the risks to be.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Mar 2018   #10
RolandJS

Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
I'm not sure why you have to back up D whenever you back up C. One of the key benefits of putting your data on a different drive than the OS is that you can back up the two drives independently of each other.
Because of this: "Hello, I have Novastor for desktop PC and I am trying to figure out best way to backup C drive OS and Data drive D where I install games, large apps etc. since a restore of C would still require an installation of everything that was on D what can be done to execute this issue..."

OP was having an OS on C and many 3rd party programs on D -- hence the need in my mind to do a full image backup each of C and D because if/when a restore is needed for the OS, the stuff on D will also have to be restored.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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