Random BSOD in WIndows 7 Kernel-Power Event ID 41

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  1. Posts : 26,824
    Windows 11 Pro
       #81

    I've never used the Macrium for cloning, I use it for imaging. But, I know others who have cloned with it and have been very successful. I use Paragon Migrate ($19.95) and it never fails. But none of them will put your data at risk. Cloning is basically just copying. The sector by sector does sound like it may be cloning. You'll have to read the instructions and make sure it is talking about an OS drive. There is a difference in cloning an OS and a data drive. But, I would assume a sector by sector copy would be a OS drive. Cloning is not risky to the data by any program I've ever seen. it is simply a copy, but in an exact manner as the program has to be aware of boot sectors and several other things.

    As for your first question, yes that's exactly what I meant. You can either do that, do a clean install of both OS's or you could gamble and try to change it and see. If it won't boot. it will BSOD. You can then go back and into bios and change it back, and usually no harm done. I think Windows 7 would be fine trying it, but I don't know how XP will deal with it. Windows 7 is much more forgiving than XP.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 54
    Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit (retail) and Windows XP SP3 dual boot config
    Thread Starter
       #82

    Perfect. I'll submit my RMA and await my new drive.

    One last question for now: Since some of my studio apps use files on my smaller 250GB drive would there be any harm in removing it so I have the bay to clone the other drive and then putting it back after the the image is done?

    I ask because I figure I'll have to change drive letters around to clone and then change them back after swapping out the drives. That shouldn't cause any issues should it?
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 26,824
    Windows 11 Pro
       #83

    That should work.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 54
    Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit (retail) and Windows XP SP3 dual boot config
    Thread Starter
       #84

    Hi Again. Just received my replacement drive from Seagate. I should have expected this... they sent me a "repaired" drive. I find that a little bit odd since the drive I'm replacing has also been "repaired" even though it was purchased brand new.

    My thoughts are that I would be just as well off keeping my existing drive and moving forward by purchasing a new drive and just imaging the old one as a back up plan. I can by a brand new drive of the exact same specs for around 50-60 bucks. If I keep the one they sent me and the existing drive I'm out 80 buck plus tax. What are your thoughts on that?

    Additionally how large drive do I actually need to image 1TB drive that currently has less than 500GB of used space?

    Thank you in advance.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 26,824
    Windows 11 Pro
       #85

    A good imaging program, will only image the used portion of the drive, no matter what size it is. But you wouldn't want to buy a new drive that would instantly be full. My personal opinion, the larger drives fail more often than smaller drives. I don't really like over 1 TB drive size. Over that you are gambling. I have 4 or 5 2 TB drives, but I use them as external backups. So, they usually last longer because they are actually running only when you do a backup and I do backups to 2 or 3 drives. That seems to make them last longer. If I were you, I would get a 750 GB drive at least. That should give you 250GB of free space. If I were doing it, I would get a 1 TB drive. The Seagate Barracuda and Western Digital drives are pretty good and pretty fast for 1 TB drives and pretty reasonable. Also remember, if you get a drive more than 80-85% full, it tends to slow it down.

    Whatever you do, make sure you back everything up externally. I don't like the ready made external drives. I have 3 or 4 external docks, which are great. You use a regular internal drive and can swap drives in 30 seconds, if you are very slow. 15 is more like it. This is what I like. If you have it, eSATA is much faster than USB 3.0. Just trust me on that. If you don't have eSATA, I'll show you how to get it for about $10. I hope that answered your questions. If not, ask again, I'll try harder.


    By the way, Macrium is about as good an imaging program there is, and the price is better. Free is hard to beat.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 54
    Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit (retail) and Windows XP SP3 dual boot config
    Thread Starter
       #86

    Any thoughts on whether or not to keep the replacement drive even though it has been repaired by Seagate? The label says "Certified Repaired HDD".

    I have had no crashes since "repairing" the bad sector on my existing drive. Just wondering if you think it's worth the trouble to clone and wipe the ld drive since I will be getting another drive for imaging anyways?
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 26,824
    Windows 11 Pro
       #87

    Tht's a decision you will have to make. But, If it were me and it was going to cost me $50-$60, I would buy a new drive instead of a repaired drive. You can get a new 1 TB hard drive for somewhere in that price range. Western Digital Blue drives and Seagate Barracuda drives are in that price range for 1 TB drives. Strange thing is, 500Gb are about the same price, at least close enough where you are within $10 to double the size. That is what I would do. The final decision is yours. Having said that, I have used factory recertified drives before and they lasted for years. but, If I'm going to pay the equivalent of a new drive, I would opt for new.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 54
    Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit (retail) and Windows XP SP3 dual boot config
    Thread Starter
       #88

    Hi essenbe (hope your still around).

    I managed to get back to this. I had disconnected my XP drive until I got my new drives. I tried using Marcium under windows 7 to clone my XP drive to my new hard drive. I've tried twice with Marcium and the clone failed both times this is the log file.

    I re-ran chkdsk /r to make sure the drive was error free but the clone still failed with the same "Clone failed - Read failed - 22 - Broken pipe" message..
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 54
    Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit (retail) and Windows XP SP3 dual boot config
    Thread Starter
       #89

    Here's a screen of the log
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 54
    Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit (retail) and Windows XP SP3 dual boot config
    Thread Starter
       #90

    Thought I would try imaging the drive and then restoring through the Marcium/Win PE rescue disc but I am a little concerned about how to do this. Can I image the XP drive while in Windows 7 and then restore it to the new drive from Win PE and make the new drive boot just like my old XP drive? All of the tutorials I have read and videos make the process look simple but then they also made the cloning process look simple... and that failed.

    I also tried to use "HDD copy tool" to copy the drive (and ignore any bad sectors) but that got part way through and just stopped responding all together. It created the 2 partitions from my XP drive on the new drive but it hung up and ended up having to cancel the action and the new drive wouldn't boot when I tried it. Maybe I'm not understanding something right?

    Would appreciate some help. Thank you!

    Any ideas as to why this is failing?
      My Computer


 
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