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Windows 7: Student fined $675,000 for sharing 30 songs

05 Aug 2009   #21
windows7user

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by garbanzo View Post
and have you ever been to a library that didn't have a room full of photocopiers? i have a few copied books myself - rare and out of print titles that would cost me $500 online, but instead just cost me $20 and half an hour of work.
I'm assuming that by going to the library, you are doing research. In that case, you're perfectly allowed to make copies of text as long as it's for research or private study. The costs, I'm assuming are to cover the costs of paper and toner, which is acceptable. It's stated in the Copyright Act (well, at least here in the USA, but other countries also have similar Acts).
Quote:
In addition, the copying for the patron must be done for purposes of private study, scholarship or research.
Here's a page that explains it clearly: Stanford Copyright & Fair Use - Library Photocopying
Here's the link to the complete US Copyright Act (go to section 108): http://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html#108

I also strongly suggest you read about the First-sale doctrine (aka First sale rule), which is also part of the Copyright Act, and states that selling used goods are perfectly legal as long as no copies are made. You do know that there are limitations to copyrights?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Aug 2009   #22
Lordbob75

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Mint 9
 
 

There is an easy way to solve a majority of music and movie piracy.

LOWER THE COST!

I know plenty (know, not befriended) of people that have a 10,000 song library. (Yes, its f****ng ridiculous, I also hate them as people.) At about a $1 a song (average cost, iTunes and so on), that is $10,000.
Holy S***! That is a LOT!

So for one song, ok its fine.
Why not offer a bulk package? Say, 100 songs for about $60? 1000 for $500?
Why don't the bands just skip the greedy f***ing b*****ds knows as Record Companies, and publish their songs online to buy for a lower or no cost? Their popularity would SOAR, especially if their music was good.

From a band standpoint, it is a great idea. They would see more of the money, and their fans would be happier. I know I would.

What do you think of that?

~~~~
As for that lawsuit.....
Damn.

There is just nothing happy about that.

~Lordbob
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Aug 2009   #23
Antman

 

Microsoft Corp v. Zamos

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Microsoft Corp v. Zamos was litigation between Microsoft and David Zamos, a student at Kent State and the University of Akron in the United States. Microsoft accused Zamos of illegally reselling his student-discounted copies of Windows XP Pro and Microsoft Office on eBay. Zamos countersued Microsoft for making false claims. When Zamos sent a press release to his local newspaper, the case received international press coverage.

At issue was the fact that Zamos acquired Microsoft software at a discount for academic use, then re-sold it to the general public on eBay for a profit. Zamos contends, and can document, that he found the software unsuitable when he realized it required him to format his computer's hard drive. He attempted to return the software, first at the University of Akron's bookstore, then directly to Microsoft.

When both of these attempted returns were denied, Zamos put the software up for sale on eBay in two auctions, the second of which was cancelled at Microsoft's request. When he successfully re-instated the auction and completed the sale, he was sued under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. His profit was $143.50 USD.
On January 3, 2005 Zamos filed a countersuit. In it he pointed out that Microsoft's claim did not represent the facts of his case, and appeared to be a boilerplate suit like thousands of others the company has filed. He exhibited a page from the claim that was identical to a page in another, except that some plural words had been changed to singular ones. The respective verbs had not been changed to their singular forms, so the page contained grammatical errors.

These counterclaims seem to have failed, as Zamos was not a "qualified end user". So he filed more claims, contending among other things that the unopened software had never presented him with the End User License Agreement and thus the opportunity to become a qualified end user. This, he asserted, amounted to deceptive sales practice.

When Zamos requested a trial by jury, Microsoft offered to drop their case if he would drop his countersuit. But he insisted on reimbursement for the software, and an apology for Microsoft's behavior. Microsoft refused this, and Zamos wrote a brief press release to the Akron Beacon Journal, which published the item on March 7, 2005.
Over the course of a single day, this item attracted so much interest that Zamos immediately received requests for interviews from all over the United States and the United Kingdom. Microsoft quickly proposed a different settlement, and Zamos agreed. As part of this settlement, Zamos has agreed not to discuss the case further.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

07 Aug 2009   #24
Lordbob75

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Mint 9
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Antman View Post
Microsoft Corp v. Zamos

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Microsoft Corp v. Zamos was litigation between Microsoft and David Zamos, a student at Kent State and the University of Akron in the United States. Microsoft accused Zamos of illegally reselling his student-discounted copies of Windows XP Pro and Microsoft Office on eBay. Zamos countersued Microsoft for making false claims. When Zamos sent a press release to his local newspaper, the case received international press coverage.

At issue was the fact that Zamos acquired Microsoft software at a discount for academic use, then re-sold it to the general public on eBay for a profit. Zamos contends, and can document, that he found the software unsuitable when he realized it required him to format his computer's hard drive. He attempted to return the software, first at the University of Akron's bookstore, then directly to Microsoft.

When both of these attempted returns were denied, Zamos put the software up for sale on eBay in two auctions, the second of which was cancelled at Microsoft's request. When he successfully re-instated the auction and completed the sale, he was sued under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. His profit was $143.50 USD.
On January 3, 2005 Zamos filed a countersuit. In it he pointed out that Microsoft's claim did not represent the facts of his case, and appeared to be a boilerplate suit like thousands of others the company has filed. He exhibited a page from the claim that was identical to a page in another, except that some plural words had been changed to singular ones. The respective verbs had not been changed to their singular forms, so the page contained grammatical errors.

These counterclaims seem to have failed, as Zamos was not a "qualified end user". So he filed more claims, contending among other things that the unopened software had never presented him with the End User License Agreement and thus the opportunity to become a qualified end user. This, he asserted, amounted to deceptive sales practice.

When Zamos requested a trial by jury, Microsoft offered to drop their case if he would drop his countersuit. But he insisted on reimbursement for the software, and an apology for Microsoft's behavior. Microsoft refused this, and Zamos wrote a brief press release to the Akron Beacon Journal, which published the item on March 7, 2005.
Over the course of a single day, this item attracted so much interest that Zamos immediately received requests for interviews from all over the United States and the United Kingdom. Microsoft quickly proposed a different settlement, and Zamos agreed. As part of this settlement, Zamos has agreed not to discuss the case further.


~Lordbob
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Aug 2009   #25
ShazaM

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64-Bit (Build 7600)
 
 

Haha that was a fun read.

To give you my own personal opinion, I think the system that controls and regulates the whole idealogy of copyright, intellectual property, etc. needs an overhaul. Piracy is a big subject in today's world of open communication and digital distribution and the fact that its uncontrollable, makes corporations and business, etc. mad. So in return they go and ask for more money and the best way to do that is to sue whoever's responsible.

There are so many things wrong in that process. First of all, Jury is never going to be fair. It can't be fair because if person x living in location a infringed on a certain scale and got sued, while person y living the location a who has downloaded 200x more than person x did doesn't. Therefore, you are spending all this time and attention on one person while there are millions of others doing the same if not worse. I understand this falls under the law of probability but if we were to continue with this process, we're gonna go nowhere.

If you think about it. All of that money that's going to the RIAA is going to their pockets and their lawyers'. Artists don't get a penny from these lumps of cash.

The problem is, the RIAA has started to use this method as a way to make extra cash. Using the loopholes in the system, they can sue anybody they want as long as that person had 1 or more cases of sharing 1 or more files "illegally". This method seems to be overseen by the law and that's what needs to change.

There needs to be a way to regulate and ammend the copyright law, maybe introduce regulatory laws that deal with the problem of filesharing rather than the overkill lawsuits. Obviously, in theory, the RIAA can sue everybody until everyone runs out of money and it will eventually have to stop. Or the government, corporations, even the RIAA itself would have to find an alternative to limit piracy.

My own personal belief is you can't stop anything by force, you can definitely not erase the idea of piracy. But you can change the way things work especially when you are the center of the problem. I believe that the solution is how to get people to support the Artist rather than stealing from them. And in a place where giant corporations control the market. It will never happen that way.

There are alternatives to the RIAA such as independent Indie labels, Creative Commons policies, and there's always supporters for that scene. I myself am one of them. Never paid for a track on iTunes or bought a CD. Yet I own over 200gb of music. I support the artists by seeing them live because I know a lot of musicians out there and my girlfriend tours with 3 very well known bands. I've had endless conversations with them about this matter and every one of them said that the RIAA needs to go down.

The world is leaning more and more towards materialism rather than innovation. Greed is an overgrowing problem and the only way to stop it is if us individuals start changing our lifestyle. Instead of paying the RIAA for their CD's and having the actual artists receive only 10% of that money, go to a concert and buy merch and support the Artists directly. All this money you're throwing on Apple, Amazon and Napster, goes to the corporations. The artists see a tiny fraction off of that.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Aug 2009   #26
Dark Nova Gamer

Windows 7 Ultimate, OS X 10.7, Ubuntu 11.04
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lordbob75 View Post
There is an easy way to solve a majority of music and movie piracy.

LOWER THE COST!

I know plenty (know, not befriended) of people that have a 10,000 song library. (Yes, its f****ng ridiculous, I also hate them as people.) At about a $1 a song (average cost, iTunes and so on), that is $10,000.
Holy S***! That is a LOT!

So for one song, ok its fine.
Why not offer a bulk package? Say, 100 songs for about $60? 1000 for $500?
Why don't the bands just skip the greedy f***ing b*****ds knows as Record Companies, and publish their songs online to buy for a lower or no cost? Their popularity would SOAR, especially if their music was good.

From a band standpoint, it is a great idea. They would see more of the money, and their fans would be happier. I know I would.

What do you think of that?

~~~~
As for that lawsuit.....
Damn.

There is just nothing happy about that.

~Lordbob
Calm yourself! I agree that the charges are way out of line, but still.


You know what they are doing right? (the RIAA) They are trying to screw one person out a crap ton of cash, to hopefully scare the pants off other piraters. It doesn't work. Everyone usually thinks 'oh what are the chances I'll be caught'.

=|
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Aug 2009   #27
Lordbob75

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Mint 9
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DarkNovaGundam View Post
Calm yourself! I agree that the charges are way out of line, but still.


You know what they are doing right? (the RIAA) They are trying to screw one person out a crap ton of cash, to hopefully scare the pants off other piraters. It doesn't work. Everyone usually thinks 'oh what are the chances I'll be caught'.

=|
Yeah, I know. Sorry.

But yes, that would be the point. I am saying instead of trying to scare Pirates (because it won't happen), why not try to make pirating less powerful, make it look unnecessary.

~Lordbob
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Aug 2009   #28
holo88

Windows 7 Ultimate x32
 
 

....bump.

Student fined 5,000 for sharing 30 songs-roflmo.jpg

poor guy
(soure, TPB)


My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Aug 2009   #29
ShazaM

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64-Bit (Build 7600)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by holo88 View Post
....bump.

Attachment 22945

poor guy
(soure, TPB)
That just made me smile
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Aug 2009   #30
masterB

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DarkNovaGundam View Post
Calm yourself! I agree that the charges are way out of line, but still.


You know what they are doing right? (the RIAA) They are trying to screw one person out a crap ton of cash, to hopefully scare the pants off other piraters. It doesn't work.

=|
That's all they can do!

I enjoy free music. You have to know where to download it from.
I don't do torrents though.

Let's be real guys.
I download an album and if I like it that much I'll buy it for my collection. I buy real music and I download BS music just for fun.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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