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Windows 7: difference between windows and mac??

11 Apr 2010   #1
bonecrusher

windows 7 enterprise (or so i want it to be)
 
 
difference between windows and mac??

hey,

thinking to myself (how dangerous) about what the difference is about how the two OS's run, i no that windows is DOS but what is mac?

DOS is disk operating system, right?

which runs off the disk, or hard drive more likely..

so wats the deal with mac, where does it run off?
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11 Apr 2010   #2
Brink

64-bit Windows 10 Pro
 
 

warning   Warning
Remember to keep the discussion in this thread friendly, and not let it turn into a Windows vs Mac bashing.

Thank you,
Shawn

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11 Apr 2010   #3
loaba

Windows 7 Home x64
 
 

They aren't really that different, when you get right down to it. I think it's more of a philosophical mindset.

About DOS: I'm sure I'll be corrected if I'm wrong, but Windows left DOS when XP was released.
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.

11 Apr 2010   #4
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by loaba View Post
They aren't really that different, when you get right down to it. I think it's more of a philosophical mindset.

About DOS: I'm sure I'll be corrected if I'm wrong, but Windows left DOS when XP was released.
I thought it was Win2000 which was the first NT based system - full 32bit versus 16bit DOS where the Win9X were both.

There is an intersting difference in price between Mac and Windows. Whilst OSX is generally cheaper than Windows, the Mac hardware is more expensive than PCs.
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11 Apr 2010   #5
pparks1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Windows and OSX are both operating systems. They are both typically installed directly on the internal hard drive and run from there. Obviously Windows is produced and developed by Microsoft and OSX is produced and developed by Apple.

Windows has evolved from the days of MS DOS. OSX is built upon Darwin which has quite a number of Unix style facilities. Both systems have their pros and cons. I suggest hitting wikipedia and reading up on each of them.
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11 Apr 2010   #6
not so gray matter

W7 Ult. x64 | OS X
 
 

As you mentioned, Windows is based on DOS technology. Mac on the other hand is based off Unix. This is one of the reasons it is so stable, it runs off the same build blocks as Linux and other *nix systems.

Until recently, there was a marked difference between the functions of the two operating systems. For example, take Windows XP and Mac OS X. Windows XP and previous builds were built for productivity. Plain and simple they are workhorses. You can churn out documents all day long. You can hold masses of data and databases, and it all runs very well. However, while XP could run multimedia, it doesn't come close to what OS X can do.

OS X is built to showcase multimedia. This makes it very good at graphics intensive operations. That's why professional image and video workers use OS X. It's just better at creating multimedia. Not only that, but if set up correctly, it shows true colors better. Granted, you need a thousand dollar monitor to do things properly, but OS X is built to create videos, pictures and all kinds of multimedia.

Nowadays the lines have started to blur a bit. While the two operating systems are still very good at what they were intended for, they have started to move into each others territory a bit more. Windows is becoming better and better at multimedia and OS X is becoming better and better at handling productivity tasks that Windows excels at.

There are other differences as well, other than the core architecture and function. Macs are extremely aestically pleasing. They're built to be beautiful. It works well with the graphics functionality. PCs might be a bit less appealing to eyes, however they're much more appealing in terms of customization. You can customize so much more of Windows and PCs than you can Macs. Not only can the hardware be stripped apart and put back together with cannabilized parts, but the operating system can function much the same as well. Macs on the other hand can be customized to a certain extent, but in order to build a mac from the ground up you need a lot more knowhow and access to specific parts and codes. It's exceedingly hard to customize macs because installing drivers is harder to do than it is with PCs. While a graphics company can come up with a new graphics card and just throw it in a Windows machine, it doesn't work so well on mac. If the drivers aren't there, the operating system may not even start.

Macs are extremely expensive. Prohibitively expensive. Why? I don't really know to tell you the truth. You could say that the hardware itself is expensive, which it is, but the same hardware on the PC market can sometimes be half as expensive as the Mac side. Then again, everything on the mac side is refined down to the smallest level. Look at the computers, they look less like computers than artwork.

So to answer your main question about how they run, Windows is based on the DOS architecture and Mac on Unix. That means that they are suited to specific things. One thing I find a bit funny is that everyone says Macs are unique and PCs are mass produced. If you think about it, the core architecture of a PC is only used by PCs. Meanwhile the core architecture of a Mac is used by anything with a *nix.

I have a Macbook Pro and have used Macs for about 8 years now. I love them to death and they work wonderfully. However, I have to say that I love PCs just as much. All for different reasons. If I was going to use a computer just to watch movies and leisurely surf the web I would prefer a Mac all the way. However, if attempting to have fun customizing and getting work done, I'll go with a PC. Thank god that Apple switched to Intel processors and I can dual boot between OS X and W7
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11 Apr 2010   #7
loaba

Windows 7 Home x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by whs View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by loaba View Post
They aren't really that different, when you get right down to it. I think it's more of a philosophical mindset.

About DOS: I'm sure I'll be corrected if I'm wrong, but Windows left DOS when XP was released.
I thought it was Win2000 which was the first NT based system - full 32bit versus 16bit DOS where the Win9X were both.
I stand corrected.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Apr 2010   #8
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

notsogreymatter, too bad we are in the chillout room. Your summary is excellent and would merit some reps. Thank you.
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11 Apr 2010   #9
zzz2496

Windows7 Ultimate 64bit
 
 

Both are operating systems, both are software that will make your hardware "work", both have similar features in terms of what hardware it supports, basically, it's one same type of software... Don't really know if there's a "difference" as "Operating System" term...

If we go a bit deeper, then we can see the difference. Windows is using Microsoft's developed "kernel", Apple forked BSD's Mach kernel for MacOS X, and developed kernel for OS 9.x and below. DOS is no where near the current OS... DOS is a legacy, was partially used in bootup process for Win 9x generation (including WinME), especially after BIOS init, one step before switching to 32bit protected mode. DOS is left by Microsoft when they created NT kernel, the kernel that is used in NT based systems, Windows NT 1 to 4 (be it server or workstation), Windows 2000 (NT 5), Windows XP (NT 5.1), Windows Vista (NT 6). Windows 7 (NT 6.1).

On the other side of the pond, there's UNIX/Linux... MacOS X's kernel is a fork off Mach, BSD UNIX's kernel. Mach kernel have a very long history to tell, starting as a mainframe OS... As time goes by, Micro computer (PC in our modern language) have enough processing power, people ran UNIX on PC hardware, and then the story continues on the next post... that is if I want to continue (feel free to continue the history ramblings if you know the story)

zzz2496
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11 Apr 2010   #10
Product FRED

Windows 7 Enterprise 64-bit
 
 

OS X is based on Unix, Windows is built (originally) from DOS. That's why iPhones/iTouches/iPads/Macs have a Unix/Linux-like folder structure.
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