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Windows 7: How to Never See a BSOD Again

05 Jun 2010   #11
profdlp

Main - Windows 7 Pro SP1 64-Bit; 2nd - Windows Server 2008 R2
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by severedsolo View Post
8. Dont buy a computer
That's a little harsh.

I have a computer which has not BSOD'd on me since last summer. Of course, it's been sitting out in my garage since then...
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05 Jun 2010   #12
kucing13

 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by stormy13 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by kucing13 View Post
Does MAC and linux have BSOD too?
Sad Mac - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mac use sfunny way and image to warn their users about pc failure. LOL
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05 Jun 2010   #13
smarteyeball

 
 

Quote:
1. Replace all your hardware once a month. Buy new RAM, hard drive, video card, CPU, and motherboard, and optical drives. Bad hardware is one of the biggest causes of BSODs, so it is important to make sure it is in good working order.
It almost feels as if I do this now...

Quote:
2. Do not install any third-party applications. Use only what comes with a retail copy of Windows, or is provided directly from Microsoft. Microsoft knows best how their OS works, and third-party developers may write code that causes BSODs.
Ha, if only

Quote:
3. If possible, remain disconnected from the internet. That way, your system has no chance of getting malware, which is another cause of BSODs.
Fair point. No chances of those BSOD causing Updates either

Quote:
4. If you must go online, be sure to use an anti-virus. Microsoft Security Essentials is the only one you should use, see #2. Use the built-in Windows Firewall, and stay away from everything else like the plague.
How dare you insult my favourite <insert user choice A/V>

Quote:
5. Do not connect any devices to the computer, other than monitors, keyboards, mice, etc. Use basic Microsoft peripherals, so that means no fancy gaming mice, etc that use third-party drivers. Thumb drives are okay, because they use generic drivers, but webcams are not.
By basic - that means PS/2 people. None of this fancy USB stuff.

Quote:
6. Stay far away from registry cleaners, no matter how reputable they may seem.
Quite logical actually

Quote:
7. Make sure your temperatures stay in control. Overheating system components will bring down a system.
So too will gravity.
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.

05 Jun 2010   #14
Jonathan_King

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by smarteyeball View Post
Quote:
1. Replace all your hardware once a month. Buy new RAM, hard drive, video card, CPU, and motherboard, and optical drives. Bad hardware is one of the biggest causes of BSODs, so it is important to make sure it is in good working order.
It almost feels as if I do this now...

Quote:
2. Do not install any third-party applications. Use only what comes with a retail copy of Windows, or is provided directly from Microsoft. Microsoft knows best how their OS works, and third-party developers may write code that causes BSODs.
Ha, if only



Fair point. No chances of those BSOD causing Updates either



How dare you insult my favourite <insert user choice A/V>



By basic - that means PS/2 people. None of this fancy USB stuff.

Quote:
6. Stay far away from registry cleaners, no matter how reputable they may seem.
Quite logical actually

Quote:
7. Make sure your temperatures stay in control. Overheating system components will bring down a system.
So too will gravity.
LOL Patrick!
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05 Jun 2010   #15
JMH

Win 7 Ultimate 64-bit. SP1.
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Jonathan_King View Post
After I read this article, I figured I'd write my own guide.

1. Replace all your hardware once a month. Buy new RAM, hard drive, video card, CPU, and motherboard, and optical drives. Bad hardware is one of the biggest causes of BSODs, so it is important to make sure it is in good working order.

2. Do not install any third-party applications. Use only what comes with a retail copy of Windows, or is provided directly from Microsoft. Microsoft knows best how their OS works, and third-party developers may write code that causes BSODs.

3. If possible, remain disconnected from the internet. That way, your system has no chance of getting malware, which is another cause of BSODs.

4. If you must go online, be sure to use an anti-virus. Microsoft Security Essentials is the only one you should use, see #2. Use the built-in Windows Firewall, and stay away from everything else like the plague.

5. Do not connect any devices to the computer, other than monitors, keyboards, mice, etc. Use basic Microsoft peripherals, so that means no fancy gaming mice, etc that use third-party drivers. Thumb drives are okay, because they use generic drivers, but webcams are not.

6. Stay far away from registry cleaners, no matter how reputable they may seem.

7. Make sure your temperatures stay in control. Overheating system components will bring down a system.
Jonathan,
Perhaps hardware should be changed daily - like your underwear!
I hope your tongue in cheek comments are not taken seriously by the uninformed!
Never underestimate the stupidity of the masses.
There is a sucker born every minute
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05 Jun 2010   #16
A Guy

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium x64 SP1
 
 

Use a monchrome monitor, no blue screens ever again! A Guy
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06 Jun 2010   #17
Prisoner

Windows 8 Pro 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by A Guy View Post
Use a monchrome monitor, no blue screens ever again! A Guy
I've gotta save that. That's just... genius. In more ways than one.


Anyway, I've had a Dell Dimension 4500 (one of the first computers in the XP era) that has not had a blue-screen in around 3 years now. I've only replaced the RAM. My system is flooded with third-party software for obvious reasons..

I'm probably due for one here soon. Better go find a monochrome monitor. XD
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07 Jun 2010   #18
gladson1976

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 (XP, 98SE, 95, 3.11, DOS 7.10 on VM) + Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Lucid Lynx
 
 

Quote:
2. Do not install any third-party applications. Use only what comes with a retail copy of Windows, or is provided directly from Microsoft. Microsoft knows best how their OS works, and third-party developers may write code that causes BSODs.
I wouldn't agree with this. Even Microsoft doesn't know how their OS works.

Quote:
Use a monchrome monitor, no blue screens ever again! A Guy
And get a GSOD
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07 Jun 2010   #19
MattRainier

7 Ultimate x64, Vista Ultimate x64, 7 Pro x64, XP Pro x86, Linux Mint Nadia Cinnamon
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by kucing13 View Post
Does MAC and linux have BSOD too?
Mac has CWOD.

Color wheel of death.

I kid you not.
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07 Jun 2010   #20
Carl Lawrence

Dual-boot: Windows 7 HP 32-bit SP1 & Windows XP Pro 32-bit SP2.
 
 

I think you might need a lot of money.
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