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Windows 7: 64 bit or x84

17 Sep 2010   #11
Bare Foot Kid
Microsoft MVP

W 7 64-bit Ultimate
 
 

Someone mentioned the correct way it should be written ...




x86-(32-bit)
x86-(64-bit)



There's actually no such thing as x64 though even MS refers to/writes it incorrectly.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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17 Sep 2010   #12
Lemur

Systems 1 and 2: Windows 7 Enterprise x64, Win 8 Developer
 
 

I don't remember the 80186, but do remember the 286, 386, 486. Then we changed to Pentium because hey, that mean five. LOL. I would have preferred 586. Now we have Nano, Atom and Sandy Bridge. Too bad!

X86-64 is a good term for 64-bit architecture. But the industry I guess prefers X64. What's in a name... and a number? Other than accuracy...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Sep 2010   #13
DeaconFrost

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Bare Foot Kid View Post
x86-(32-bit)
x86-(64-bit)

There's actually no such thing as x64 though even MS refers to/writes it incorrectly.
You are correct, but the x64 naming convention was created by Microsoft as a shorter, simple way of differentiating between the two. IA64 isn't really all that common anymore (dying a slow death, it seems) and was never known or common the general, non IT audience.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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17 Sep 2010   #14
alphanumeric

Windows 10 Education 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lemur View Post
You have a 64-bit processor running a 32-bit operating system. No harm. You always can purchase a 64-bit operating system later on. Note - you cannot upgrade from 32-bit to 64-bit operating system. It has to be a new full install.
If its windows 7 you can use the same product code to install the 32 bit or 64 bit version, so all you need to switch is the install media. If you buy retail you get both DVDs. If you go OEM you only get one, 32 bit or 64 bit. You can still switch from 32 to 64 or vice versa you just need to hunt up the other DVD some where. Assuming you have a 64 bit processor.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Sep 2010   #15
derekimo

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Win 10 Pro x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by nithig View Post
Thanks Miked ... you did understand the question
It's just me (and no doubt lots of others like me) who are slow with
the jargon. It's just a fact of modern, electronic life that new things
are rarely explained ...one has to find out for oneself.
Now there's one more bit that I do understand.

No Tews, Win 7 is istalled as 64-bit
I think it's 64 bit guys.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Sep 2010   #16
bobtran

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by alphanumeric View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lemur View Post
You have a 64-bit processor running a 32-bit operating system. No harm. You always can purchase a 64-bit operating system later on. Note - you cannot upgrade from 32-bit to 64-bit operating system. It has to be a new full install.
If its windows 7 you can use the same product code to install the 32 bit or 64 bit version, so all you need to switch is the install media. If you buy retail you get both DVDs. If you go OEM you only get one, 32 bit or 64 bit. You can still switch from 32 to 64 or vice versa you just need to hunt up the other DVD some where. Assuming you have a 64 bit processor.
You also get both disks x86/x64(x86-64) easier to type x64, a lazy typist I am - Care I do not.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Sep 2010   #17
nithig

Windows 7 Pro 64bit SP1
 
 

Quote:
It has to be a new full install.
It was a total,new install and 64 bit ws selected.
Programs like IE have x64 and the updates are x64
so I guess it's a 64 bit system
___________________

Thanks barefootkid for the tutorial - really enjoying the tutorial herein.

Also thanks to Keiichi25 and Deacon Frost 7 alphanumeric ...
DF you are clearly a technical minded person so I kindly point out to you
that to us bogons it is jargon and it is rarely explained untill we ask and
get help from friends as has happened in this case.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Sep 2010   #18
derekimo

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Win 10 Pro x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by nithig View Post
Quote:
It has to be a new full install.
It was a total,new install and 64 bit ws selected.
Programs like IE have x64 and the updates are x64
so I guess it's a 64 bit system
___________________

Thanks barefootkid for the tutorial - really enjoying the tutorial herein.

Also thanks to Keiichi25 and Deacon Frost 7 alphanumeric ...
DF you are clearly a technical minded person so I kindly point out to you
that to us bogons it is jargon and it is rarely explained untill we ask and
get help from friends as has happened in this case.
Best way to find out is to ask, now you know.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
18 Sep 2010   #19
smarteyeball

 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by nithig View Post
Quote:
It has to be a new full install.
It was a total,new install and 64 bit ws selected.
Programs like IE have x64 and the updates are x64
so I guess it's a 64 bit system
___________________
There are two very quick and simple ways to determine if you have either x86 (32) or x64 installed:

A) WIN+Pause/Break to open the system properties.

If the system type: shows 64-bit Operating System - you have x64 installed. If it shows 32-bit Operating system - you have x86 (32) installed.

x86 (32-bit)
64 bit or x84-x86.png
x64
64 bit or x84-x64.jpg

B) If you have a C:\Program Files (x86) folder, you have x64 installed.

If you don't have that folder, you only have the 32-bit version installed.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
18 Sep 2010   #20
rvbfan

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by alphanumeric View Post
I believe the x86 came from the fact that Intel numbered thier line of processors 8086, 80186, 80286, 386, 486, 586 (pentium) etc, so it ended up being referred to as the x86 instruction set. The early chips are 16 bit and the 386 and up are 32 bit. At some point people just dropped the 80 and would say I have a 386 or 486 etc.
Bingo you get a cookie! Mmmm Cookie arrrggammdihfg.
It was more than a numbering system though. The term x86 refers to a family of instruction sets.
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 64 bit or x84




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