Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: What is RAID?

20 Dec 2010   #1
youllbelost

Dual Booting Windows 7 64-Bit Ultimate Edition and Fedora 16.
 
 
What is RAID?

Can i get a detailed article on RAID. What is it? What does it need? What are its advantages?

I think i have RAID enabled desktop(if there is anything like that !?!)

How to enable the thing.
I think i have asked this question before. But i didnt get what it was..

wanna learn
YBL


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
20 Dec 2010   #2
DeaconFrost

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

This is a huge question to answer, but to get you started, it stands for Redundant Array of Individual (or Independent) Disks. There are different levels, denoted by a number, on how it uses the drives. My fave, and the only one with any real benefit in my opinion is RAID5. You need at least three disks, and you get the total capacity of the total number of disks minus one. The data is written across the drives, so if one drive fails, you don't lose anything. For example, if you had 4 500GB drives in a RAID5 array, you'd see a single, solid drive of 1.5 GB. If one drive failed, you could replace it, and it would rebuild...losing nothing, with zero downtime.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Dec 2010   #3
youllbelost

Dual Booting Windows 7 64-Bit Ultimate Edition and Fedora 16.
 
 

Oh its a whole different thing. I thought it is a connection through which you get godlike speed. But what i get is that it is primarily for Data Security. and it needs more than one drive for enabling RAID. ?
Am i right?

YBL
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

20 Dec 2010   #4
DeaconFrost

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

Yes, you need multiple drives to set up an array, but some can be configured with as little as two drives.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Dec 2010   #5
pbcopter

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1, Windows 8.1 Pro x64, Windows 10 Pro x64
 
 

My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Dec 2010   #6
pparks1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DeaconFrost View Post
This is a huge question to answer, but to get you started, it stands for Redundant Array of Individual (or Independent) Disks.
You are right, it is a huge question to answer. With most things, wikipedia is often a very good starting point for information on a new subject;
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DeaconFrost View Post
My fave, and the only one with any real benefit in my opinion is RAID5.
Perhaps that's the only on that you use, but they all offer benefits. For example, for pure speed RAID 0 is great. It stripes across 2 disks and doubles your speed. But there is 0 redundancy. RAID 1 is great, as it mirrors one drive on the second one. However, you do lose 50% of your total disk capacity and you get no speed gains..in fact you get a very tiny speed hit as 2 drives have to write the data. RAID 10 is very useful if you run something like a database. First it stripes the data across 2 drives (to give speed), but then mirrors them (to add redundancy). RAID 50's are cool as they stripe (with parity for redundancy), but then also stripe across 2 volumes to add back speed.


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DeaconFrost View Post
If one drive failed, you could replace it, and it would rebuild...losing nothing, with zero downtime.
Of course, with most home machines, you have to take downtime to actually remove the drive and replace it. With servers and such, they are usually hot swappable...so you don't have to turn it off at all.

With RAID 5, there is a performance penalty on writes, as it has to calculate parity bits on each and every write. So, with something like your OS drive and such that has high I/O...you don't want to use RAID 5 at all. RAID 5 is great for data drives...where you need data protection and you are doing much more infrequent writes.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Dec 2010   #7
jfar

Vista Ult64, Win7600
 
 

My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Dec 2010   #8
DeaconFrost

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
For example, for pure speed RAID 0 is great. It stripes across 2 disks and doubles your speed.
That's one of the largest myths ever debunked in the world of computing. Anandtech did the most definitive, and final report on the subject, and your real world performance is not what you'd expect. On top of that, seek times actually increase, slowing down certain operations. Only in rare, large file operations will you see any improvement, and even then, it is hardly double...it's more like 5-10%. That's why you don't see it anymore, unless it is with someone who's still buying into the hype and ignoring the facts. Anandtech's article is still online for any doubters. I participated in [H]ardOCP's large scale test back in the day with my two 36 GB Raptors. I used to think RAID0 was great, until I tested for myself. I ended up selling one of the drives for a larger storage drive...and lost nothing in the way of performance.

*Keep in mind my comments are only valid for mechanical drives...not SSDs. They are a whole new ballgame.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Dec 2010   #9
pparks1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DeaconFrost View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
For example, for pure speed RAID 0 is great. It stripes across 2 disks and doubles your speed.
That's one of the largest myths ever debunked in the world of computing.
Huh....not sure what you are talking about. A proper RAID 0 with fast hard drives and a solid RAID card when used for storage can provide fantastic results. I would not use it for running my operating system on.....as the small amounts of read/writes wouldn't benefit any. But for straight up file manipulation with large files and data sets, it makes a huge improvement.

But for somebody who frequently copies 50GB databases, and hundreds of GB's of virtual machines from 1 folder to a backup folder...a RAID 0 stripe makes a huge improvement.

And I'm talking about RAID 0 stripes usually with 2-4 drives, and mostly 15,000 RPM enterprise class SCSI/SAS drives. I'm not talking about home use with 2 commodity hard drives in a gaming rig thinking that I am l33t.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Dec 2010   #10
DeaconFrost

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
And I'm talking about RAID 0 stripes usually with 2-4 drives, and mostly 15,000 RPM enterprise class SCSI/SAS drives. I'm not talking about home use with 2 commodity hard drives in a gaming rig thinking that I am l33t.
Those drives are going to be fast anyway you use them. My gripe is with people who take two off-the-shelf consumer SATA drives, and run them in RAID0, suddenly talking about how great their performance is. That's the "myth" of RAID0 that was debunked.

My comments above shouldn't draw any surprises at this point in time. If you'd like, I'll dig up the article for you. it was pretty much the defacto word on desktop RAID0, but to your other point...it was only discussing consumer level drives.

Found a link:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/1371/11
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 What is RAID?




Thread Tools




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
RAID - deleted RAID array, Windows 7 ok but I have questions
Hi all, My RAID 1 (I think? I have two equal drives that are mirrored) array was causing me a lot of pain. It kept freezing up my system and having me to had to rebuild the RAID too often. After a number of tests and browsing info online, I've decided that the RAID was the culprit of the freezing...
Hardware & Devices
Converting to Raid 0 Windows 7, NOT Hardware Raid 0
I have tried to find the way to do this, but without success as I cannot see the wood for the trees. Any help or URL would be welcome. I have a mature W7 system, with so many applications loaded that rebuilding from scratch is just not an option. I have a 300MB Velociraptor wholly given over to...
Installation & Setup
Win 7 raid 0 setup / missing raid controller driver
Installed a new M4 ssd today and loaded windows on it. Previously i was using 2 raptors in raid 0 for the os and programs. I re raided the 2 raptors and connected them to the jmicron ports and set them up for raid in bios, then created the raid 0 array no prob. Windows doesnt see the array when...
Drivers
RAID 5 switched from single storage to raid 5, lost drive letter
I am running 7 pro 64bit on a ASUS p8p67 deluxe mobo and I copied all data from my 1tb storage D: drive to a backup external and proceded to install raid 5 with 3 single 1tb drives and the raid is up an running. However using Intel Rapid Storage Technology to setup the raid inside windows I had to...
General Discussion
Cannot boot from non-RAID image restored to RAID SSD
OK, I was using one Vertex 120 as my Windows 7 C: drive and bought another to take advantage of RAID0 performance. Did a system image backup of the C: drive to my 1TB D: drive, installed the 2nd Vertex 120 (both are FW 1.5), enabled RAID in BIOS and created a RAID0 in the Intel RAID launch...
Backup and Restore
Windows 7 System Image - Restore Non-RAID to RAID 0+1
I created a windows system image with the backup and restore utility built into win7. This windows install is on a single hard drive. I built and onboard RAID 0+1 array and used the windows 7 install disk to restore the image on to the new RAID volume. Windows starts to boot up but the screen goes...
Backup and Restore


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:32.
Twitter Facebook Google+ Seven Forums iOS App Seven Forums Android App