How to do shortcut bat files to choose next login OS - dual boot 7 - 8


  1. Posts : 106
    Dual boot - Win 7 Pro 64-bit and Win 10 Pro 64-bit
       #1

    How to do shortcut bat files to choose next login OS - dual boot 7 - 8


    I have dual boot Win 7 Pro 64-bit and Win 8 Pro 64-bit on a Dell Optiplex 7010 MT.

    How can I write two batch files on the desktop of EACH OS to tell it to reboot either into Win 7 or into Win 8? (Four batch files total, two on each desktop.)

    Need it because I frequently remote into this machine and have no way of rebooting efficiently into the desired OS.

    I now can do the following manually in each OS:
    ***System Properties - Startup and Recovery - Settings - System Startup - Default Operating System - select which one - OK - manual Restart***
    but it takes too long.

    I'd like some batch files that do all of that for me.

    Thanks!!
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 5,092
    Windows 7 32 bit
       #2

    It sounds like a mouse macro record/playback freeware would be the easiest way. There are quite a few for download. Start recording then do the mouse clicks and save, for each OS boot. It may be easier to get the mouse clicks right than trying to run batch commands.

    Check the free download sites for mouse macro record/playback utilities.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 106
    Dual boot - Win 7 Pro 64-bit and Win 10 Pro 64-bit
    Thread Starter
       #3

    Miles - Thanks for the suggestion, and I like your photo of Mr. D.

    But to start I'd like to hold out for true .bat files that do the same thing as the steps I outlined above. and since I posted the above, I learned there's yet another set of steps that almost does the same thing:
    *** Run - msconfig - Boot - [select the OS] - Apply* - OK - manual Restart***
    * "Apply" is dicey - it's greyed out unless I toggle something else on and off. But I imagine if I practiced I'd figure that one out.

    However, Mr. Miles, if you know of a mouse-following recorder that WRITES THE BAT FILE AS AN EDITABLE FILE and does NOT focus on where the mouse moved on the screen, please let me know - that might be the best start and very useful for the future. Reminder that I have both Win 7 Pro 64-bit and Win 8 Pro 64-bit.

    Again, many thanks.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 5,092
    Windows 7 32 bit
       #4

    Even better you can post a request to have the program written for you on DonationCoder.com. See the Coding Snacks section. Here's the Link to the Post New Requests Here subforum, but please read the guidelines before posting.

    I have been on that site for years. Sometimes I write the requested program but most are done by the moderator, skwire. Usually it's done in AutoHotkey, which is a free Windows scripting language designed for hotkey and macro stuff.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 106
    Dual boot - Win 7 Pro 64-bit and Win 10 Pro 64-bit
    Thread Starter
       #5

    Miles - did as you suggested. Shall post back here if those good folks come up with the answer.

    But other folks reading this thread should chime in - what do you think?
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 5,092
    Windows 7 32 bit
       #6

    glnz said:
    Miles - did as you suggested. Shall post back here if those good folks come up with the answer.

    But other folks reading this thread should chime in - what do you think?
    That's multitasking. :)
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 721
    Windows 10, Windows 8.1 Pro, Windows 7 Professional, OS X El Capitan
       #7

    Hey guys,

    Booting into another OS through batch files, I'd think it would not be possible with commands -- that's before I did a bit of Google-ing. The BCDedit command is likely able to help with your intention, Glnz.

    Did you ever try STTR's suggestion to your cloned question at Superuser?
    Code:
    bcdedit /default {GUID}
    Where GUID (which stands for Globally Unique Identifier, in case you wonder) must be substituted for the unique hexadecimal string that is assigned to the relevant boot entry in favour. This string can be found by running 'Bcdedit /v' on an elevated command prompt. The GUID will be the first sequence of hex-characters under each boot entry and to the right of 'identifier'.
    Last edited by Pyprohly; 01 Dec 2014 at 07:06.
      My Computer


 

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