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Windows 7: windows 7 and dual Cpu's

14 Nov 2009   #11
ignatzatsonic

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1, 64-bit
 
 

Ancient 11:

You do NOT need to buy the "full" version. Save some coin and go with the retail upgrade version, probably Home Premium Retail Upgrade.

You will have to do a "clean" install and re-install all of your programs.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
14 Nov 2009   #12
CSSteve

Windows 7 64 bit Professional
 
 

I would recommend that anyone with XP buy a full version.
The upgrade version is designed not to allow a full install on any system with a new hard drive or no qualifying operating system currently installed.
This means if you replace your hard drive at any point, Microsoft would like you to install your old operating system first, then use the Windows 7 upgrade disk to upgrade after that.

To me, this is an insane waste of time. The old system of prompting you to pop in your old OS disk during the install was just fine. MS went backwards on this procedure. In fact, there are work arounds published on the net so you don't even need to own an older OS disk now to do a clean install. So, this was a failed idea for them too.

If you look at some of the better online stores, you can find Windows 7 Pro for system builders for about 150. This is definitely the way to go if you don't use or need MS support.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Nov 2009   #13
ancient11

Windows 7
 
 

I am sorry for the confusion, I have one processor with a duel core. Please accept my apology
thank you
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

14 Nov 2009   #14
gregrocker

 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by CSSteve View Post
I would recommend that anyone with XP buy a full version.
The upgrade version is designed not to allow a full install on any system with a new hard drive or no qualifying operating system currently installed.
This means if you replace your hard drive at any point, Microsoft would like you to install your old operating system first, then use the Windows 7 upgrade disk to upgrade after that.

To me, this is an insane waste of time. The old system of prompting you to pop in your old OS disk during the install was just fine. MS went backwards on this procedure. In fact, there are work arounds published on the net so you don't even need to own an older OS disk now to do a clean install. So, this was a failed idea for them too.

If you look at some of the better online stores, you can find Windows 7 Pro for system builders for about 150. This is definitely the way to go if you don't use or need MS support.
Incorrect. As has been tracked here starting within an hour after Win7 Upgrade release, the Upgrade can be installed to a new or formatted HDD.
Clean Install with a Upgrade Windows 7 Version

Furthermore the Upgrade is migratable to another machine with qualifying OS, while an builder's OEM is locked to the hardware of the one machine.

The Upgrade can be reinstalled using the same method without ever reinstalling XP. Just keep your XP key readable and paired with the Upgrade in case reactivation should ever be elevated to a MS person, which almost never happens.

Reinstalls will never again be necessary since Win7 brings Backup Imaging to the masses. Create a Backup Image to store externally or in a primary partition and you can reimage your HDD or a replacement in 15 minutes flawlessly.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Nov 2009   #15
CSSteve

Windows 7 64 bit Professional
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by gregrocker View Post

Incorrect. As has been tracked here starting within an hour after Win7 Upgrade release, the Upgrade can be installed to a new or formatted HDD.
Clean Install with a Upgrade Windows 7 Version

Furthermore the Upgrade is migratable to another machine with qualifying OS, while an builder's OEM is locked to the hardware of the one machine.

The Upgrade can be reinstalled using the same method without ever reinstalling XP. Just keep your XP key readable and paired with the Upgrade in case reactivation should ever be elevated to a MS person, which almost never happens.

Reinstalls will never again be necessary since Win7 brings Backup Imaging to the masses. Create a Backup Image to store externally or in a primary partition and you can reimage your HDD or a replacement in 15 minutes flawlessly.
I am not sure why you say "Incorrect". The link that you refer to merely explains exactly what I was saying.
If you try to activate an upgrade edition and a full install on a new hard drive, you will get and activation error. Thus, eliminating option 1 and 2 on this tutorial.
Option 3 depicts the work around that I was referring to in my post that is published in several places on the web by some very helpful, knowledgeable folks.
Option 3 directs the user to make registry modifications to work around this security feature. This is not something included with the Microsoft instructions. In fact, they officially recommend that you install your old OS first, then upgrade (hence my post). The work around is certainly doable but it is not the type of procedure that the average user would find "comfortable" or convenient.

As for the system builders limitations tying it to the system, that is an excellent point and one that should certainly be considered when assessing the value of that choice.

I also LOVE the imaging feature. I was going to purchase software to do just that but, like so many things with Windows 7, I don't have to purchase aftermarket software. It is included.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Nov 2009   #16
bobkn

Windows 7 Pro X64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ancient11 View Post
I am sorry for the confusion, I have one processor with a duel core. Please accept my apology
thank you
Just to be clear:

Windows 7 Home premium supports a single processor socket. That processor could have a large number of cores. (I forget the number, but it may be 256, much more than any current CPU.)

For example: I'm running Win7 Home Premium with an Intel Core I7 CPU. It has 4 physical cores, plus hyperthreading. Win7 Home Pr. shows 8 processors. (4 of them are virtual.)

Win7 Professional and Ultimate both support 2 sockets, I've read.

As for buying an upgrade or full version: the full version has fewer restrictions, but only you can decide whether it's worth the extra money. I suggest that you read this:

Clean install with Windows 7 upgrade media? Get the facts! | Ed Bott’s Microsoft Report | ZDNet.com


Either way, going from XP to Win7 would require a clean install, which means that you'd have to re-install all of your applications (programs).

You should probably download and run the Upgrade Advisor before you do anything else. It's not a perfect tool, but it may point out some of the problems you migh have in the upgrade. (Software that would need to be updated, hardware that may lack Win7 drivers, etc.)

Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor - Download - Microsoft Windows
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Nov 2009   #17
gregrocker

 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by CSSteve View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by gregrocker View Post
Incorrect. As has been tracked here starting within an hour after Win7 Upgrade release, the Upgrade can be installed to a new or formatted HDD.
https://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/31402-clean-install-upgrade-windows-7-version.html

Furthermore the Upgrade is migratable to another machine with qualifying OS, while an builder's OEM is locked to the hardware of the one machine.

The Upgrade can be reinstalled using the same method without ever reinstalling XP. Just keep your XP key readable and paired with the Upgrade in case reactivation should ever be elevated to a MS person, which almost never happens.

Reinstalls will never again be necessary since Win7 brings Backup Imaging to the masses. Create a Backup Image to store externally or in a primary partition and you can reimage your HDD or a replacement in 15 minutes flawlessly.
I am not sure why you say "Incorrect". The link that you refer to merely explains exactly what I was saying.
If you try to activate an upgrade edition and a full install on a new hard drive, you will get and activation error. Thus, eliminating option 1 and 2 on this tutorial.
Option 3 depicts the work around that I was referring to in my post that is published in several places on the web by some very helpful, knowledgeable folks.
Option 3 directs the user to make registry modifications to work around this security feature. This is not something included with the Microsoft instructions. In fact, they officially recommend that you install your old OS first, then upgrade (hence my post). The work around is certainly doable but it is not the type of procedure that the average user would find "comfortable" or convenient.

As for the system builders limitations tying it to the system, that is an excellent point and one that should certainly be considered when assessing the value of that choice.

I also LOVE the imaging feature. I was going to purchase software to do just that but, like so many things with Windows 7, I don't have to purchase aftermarket software. It is included.

What I referred to as "incorrect" in your original post is your recommendation to buy a full retail Win7 version to upgrade XP. That is a waste of money when MS specifically allows XP to be upgraded to Win7, and even is giving out the registry workaround to callers to their Tech Support who don't want to reinstall XP to Upgrade using the necessary clean install.

If the registry workaround is too technical, they upgraders only need to run a repair install (upgrade over itself) to get the Upgrade to accept their key.

Also the builder's OEM you recommend would be tied to the hardware and not migratable to another machine as the Upgrade is.

Perhaps I should have used "wasteful" rather than "incorrect". I hate to waste money.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Nov 2009   #18
CSSteve

Windows 7 64 bit Professional
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by gregrocker View Post
What I referred to as "incorrect" in your original post is your recommendation to buy a full retail Win7 version to upgrade XP. That is a waste of money when MS specifically allows XP to be upgraded to Win7, and even is giving out the registry workaround to callers to their Tech Support who don't want to reinstall XP to Upgrade using the necessary clean install.

If the registry workaround is too technical, they upgraders only need to run a repair install (upgrade over itself) to get the Upgrade to accept their key.

Also the builder's OEM you recommend would be tied to the hardware and not migratable to another machine as the Upgrade is.

Perhaps I should have used "wasteful" rather than "incorrect". I hate to waste money.
Ah, good to know Windows is now changing it's tune. All of the early reports that I heard was Microsoft was saying they did not recommend "tampering" with the registry.

The registry entry was certainly not a big deal for me and I would rather do that than have an OS tied to a computer permanently. So, from that standpoint, I agree.

That is also a great tip on the set up / repair work around. I will make note of that.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Nov 2009   #19
Uzi

 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ancient11 View Post
I knew it showed 2 processors in the trial edition. I have no need for the Pro for I am just an old man that can barely find his way around.
The one remaining question---Will they let you upgrade from XP or do you have to buy the full version.
thank you.
I recently upgraded my XP pro machine to Win 7 64 bit.

I suggest snagging
Windows Easy Transfer for transferring from Windows XP (32 bit) to Windows 7

Download details: Windows Easy Transfer for transferring from Windows XP (32 bit) to Windows 7

I used that and magically most of my settings that related to email and many other programs , where there in Win 7 after I installed said programs, also I easily migrated all the junk I had in my old XP 'my documents' section.

I suggest zipping up your old documents folder tree separately though in case something goes wrong and be sure to save that to a external drive. Zip files anyone can understand so it's a great backup.

I can still dual boot to Xp here but I've had no need to go back to it since. I'll keep my old XP boot sector around in case I do but so far, no need.
I will say I had a heck of a time getting my system working for dual boot but I managed to solve it after a day of work. Google is my best advisor.

One tip. If you run two monitors I suggest unplugging the secondary during install or be ready for windows to find the 'wrong monitor' during installation. (long story I wont' go into). Plug the 2nd monitor in later.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Nov 2009   #20
bobtran

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by bobkn View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ancient11 View Post
I am sorry for the confusion, I have one processor with a duel core. Please accept my apology
thank you
Just to be clear:

Windows 7 Home premium supports a single processor socket. That processor could have a large number of cores. (I forget the number, but it may be 256, much more than any current CPU.)

For example: I'm running Win7 Home Premium with an Intel Core I7 CPU. It has 4 physical cores, plus hyperthreading. Win7 Home Pr. shows 8 processors. (4 of them are virtual.)

Win7 Professional and Ultimate both support 2 sockets, I've read.

As for buying an upgrade or full version: the full version has fewer restrictions, but only you can decide whether it's worth the extra money. I suggest that you read this:

Clean install with Windows 7 upgrade media? Get the facts! | Ed Bott’s Microsoft Report | ZDNet.com


Either way, going from XP to Win7 would require a clean install, which means that you'd have to re-install all of your applications (programs).

You should probably download and run the Upgrade Advisor before you do anything else. It's not a perfect tool, but it may point out some of the problems you migh have in the upgrade. (Software that would need to be updated, hardware that may lack Win7 drivers, etc.)

Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor - Download - Microsoft Windows
Not quite correct...Home Premium with support TWO (2) physical sockets with as many cores as they have (2, 3, 4, more when available). Home BASIC will only support ONE (1) physical socket.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 windows 7 and dual Cpu's




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