Will creating folders in Win 7, using Linux, cause CHKDSK to run?

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  1. Posts : 176
    Dual boot Win7 Pro 64 & Linux Mint 18.3
       #1

    Will creating folders in Win 7, using Linux, cause CHKDSK to run?


    My dual boot system has Win 7 and Linux Mint, plus I have a storage drive that both OS's can access. The other day I made some folders on the storage drive while I was in Linux. Then I went to Win 7 and CHKDSK decided to run, the last time it did this it hosed the system and it wouldn't boot. I had to restore an Acronis image to repair it. This time mercifully the check went Ok and I could boot to 7 again.

    Question is, since I didn't make any changes to the SSD boot drive where both OS's reside I thought I could work on the storage drive with no problems and not incur a run of CHKDSK. It all runs so fast there was no way to tell what it found, so I can't offer anything that might have been related to it..shouldn't I be able to edit files etc on the storage drive from either OS with no trouble?

    Fwiw the folders I made and the contents, on the storage drive, are readable just fine in 7, so it's not as if I lost any data. Just puzzled as to what set off CHKDSK in the first place, maybe just and odd coincidence? I thought the disc check only applied to the boot drive.

    Regards,

    J T
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 20,583
    Win-7-Pro64bit 7-H-Prem-64bit
       #2

    Hi,
    Probably would yes.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 5,092
    Windows 7 32 bit
       #3

    Samba is a Linux method of sharing Windows partitions/folders. This page seems to have good info for creating Windows folders from Linux:
    https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2018285

    I assume your drives are MBR based and not GPT? That's the only thing I would check before using the info on the page I referenced.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 176
    Dual boot Win7 Pro 64 & Linux Mint 18.3
    Thread Starter
       #4

    MilesAhead said:
    Samba is a Linux method of sharing Windows partitions/folders. This page seems to have good info for creating Windows folders from Linux:
    https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2018285

    I assume your drives are MBR based and not GPT? That's the only thing I would check before using the info on the page I referenced.

    Hi Miles,

    Yes they are MBR. I will check out the link you provided, thanks a lot. I don't intend to do this as a daily practice, I actually did it without thinking, then went to 7 and chaos ensued! Luckily I got away with it this time.

    Cheers,

    "ES"
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 20,583
    Win-7-Pro64bit 7-H-Prem-64bit
       #5

    Hi,
    Yea just because Linux can access Windows doesn't mean you should :)
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 2,499
    Windows 7 Pro 64 bit
       #6

    ThrashZone said:
    Hi,
    Yea just because Linux can access Windows doesn't mean you should :)
    Yes.

    NTFS is a proprietary file system that has not been fully documented and it's support on non Windows systems is generally incomplete. Some versions of Linux take the easy way out and support only reading from an NTFS volume. This is safe. Other Linux developers use their incomplete knowledge and support writing to NTFS. And most of the time it works. But if the volume uses some the more advanced features of NTFS or does something a bit unusual the results become unpredictable.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 5,092
    Windows 7 32 bit
       #7

    Tinsby said:
    MilesAhead said:
    Samba is a Linux method of sharing Windows partitions/folders. This page seems to have good info for creating Windows folders from Linux:
    https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2018285

    I assume your drives are MBR based and not GPT? That's the only thing I would check before using the info on the page I referenced.

    Hi Miles,

    Yes they are MBR. I will check out the link you provided, thanks a lot. I don't intend to do this as a daily practice, I actually did it without thinking, then went to 7 and chaos ensued! Luckily I got away with it this time.

    Cheers,

    "ES"
    You are welcome. As others noted it is generally safer to create a partition using the native system and access it on the foreign OS but I suspect if you get all the numbers right you will be OK. Just have all backed up. NTFS is a bit strange because there is XP and earlier then Vista and later. Exactly what they "added" in Vista is somewhat mysterious. I had a partition backup program that hosed my partitions a few times because it did not get Vista NTFS details correct even though it was "updated" for Vista several times.

    It's always a bit of a risk writing from the foreign OS. Most of the time mounting as read/only is pretty fool proof.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 20,583
    Win-7-Pro64bit 7-H-Prem-64bit
       #8

    Hi,
    Yea I'm not all that sure it's a good idea to share partitions either or the same disk for that matter with Linux :)
    You have to remember corruption/ malware.... that doesn't affect Linux does affect Windows and Linux will not care what is transferred :)
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 176
    Dual boot Win7 Pro 64 & Linux Mint 18.3
    Thread Starter
       #9

    Next time I decide to add or remove folders from 7 I'll do it from 7 and everything else that pertains to Windows I'll do in that OS.

    " Thrash " is right when he says " just because you can doesn't mean you should" lol

    Point taken! But it IS very reassuring that in case the MS OS won't boot or is hosed entirely I can get the files using Linux.
    Plus I have many Acronis image backups that have saved my bacon on both 7 and Mint a few times. Only way to see if a backup system works is to try it!

    My system is configured so booting of windows is done by it's native boot-loader, Linux is booted by the GRUB boot-loader. Normally installing Linux you give up the MS bootloader and GRUB boots BOTH OS's. Only thing is if you lose GRUB you can't boot either system. In my case should I lose one, I can always access the other. Most folks rely on GRUB and that's fine, but I like my way better....

    Thanks all
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 1,167
    W10 32 bit, XUbuntu 18.xx 64 bit
       #10

    That is kind of strange. I am able to remove and add folders files to a windows 7 partition from Linux partition without CHKDSK running. I am also able to add folder & files to a removable drive from both windows & Linux without issue.

    There is a command to disable chkdsk for certain drives in windows but I can't seem to find that info right now, maybe someone else can help you on that. I am using both Windows 7 sp1 & Linux mint xfce right now.

    One tip. Make sure you unmount the removable drive or any ntfs partition before you restart or shutdown Linux, that could cause windows chkdsk to run.

    Note, after ejecting or unmounting removable drive(s) from Linux, unplug them from the usb ports before exiting out of Linux and rebooting into windows.
      My Computer


 
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